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West Virginia University 

B u 1 1 . -&. t 




Graduate Catalog 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 
CHARLES C. WISE, JR., LIBRARY 
ACQUISITIONS DEPT., PO F \ 
MORGANTQWN, W.V 26536 



Produced by Publications Services, Office of Institutional Advancement, 

West Virginia University. All material herein is copyright © West Virginia University, 1998. 

Editor: Laura Spitznogle 

Compositor: Karyn Cummings 

Cover Design: Tammy Wymer 

Cover Photography: WVU Photographic Services 



West Virginia 
University 



1998-2000 

Graduate Catalog 



^ 



West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 • www.wvu.edu 

West Virginia University is a land grant, research institution founded in 1867. 

WVU is meeting the changing needs of our state and nation through 

teaching, research, service, and technology. 



West Virginia University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. The University does 
not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, age, handicap, veteran status, religion, sexual orienta- 
tion, color, or national origin in the administration of any of its educational programs or activities or 
with respect to admission and employment. The University neither affiliates with nor grants recogni- 
tion to any individual, group, or organization having policies that discriminate on the basis of race, 
sex, age, handicap, veteran status, religion, sexual orientation, color, or national origin, as defined 
by the applicable laws and regulations. Further, faculty, staff, students, and applicants are protected 
from retaliation for filing complaints or assisting in an investigation under the University's Equal 
Opportunity/Affirmative Action Plan. Inquiries regarding the University's nondiscrimination policy 
may be directed to the Director of Affirmative Action/EEO Programs, West Virginia University. 

-Office of the President 



West Virginia University (ISSN 0362-3009) Series 98, No. 4, March, 1998. 

Issued in March, April, September, and October. Second-class postage paid at 

Morgantown, WV 26505 and at additional mailing offices. 

POSTMASTER: Send Form 3579 to West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6568. 



Table of Contents 



Part 1 Government and Organization of WVU 5 

Board of Trustees, Board of Advisors, Cabinet 7 

Assistant Vice Presidents, Deans, Directors 8 

Chaired and Distinguished Professors 9 

Degree Programs 10 

Part 2 Graduate Education at WVU 12 

Organization 13 

Graduate Faculty 14 

Application 16 

International Students 18 

Transfer Procedures 20 

Admission 21 

Enrollment and Registration 23 

Scholarship 26 

Withdrawals 29 

Degree Completion 30 

Doctoral Degree 31 

Summary of Doctoral Requirements 34 

Summary of Master's Requirements 35 

Part 3 Facilities, Fees, and Financial Aid 36 

Facilities, Housing, Library Services 36 

Residency Policy 38 

Fees and Expenses 40 

Student Refund Policy 41 

Financial Aid 42 

Academic Honesty/Integrity 45 

Fee Charts 48 

Part 4 Programs and Courses 51 

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences 53 

Agricultural Education (M.S.) 59 

Agricultural and Resource Economics (M.S.) 61 

Agricultural Sciences (Ph.D.) 65 

Animal and Veterinary Sciences (M.S.) 67 

Family and Consumer Sciences (M.S.) 70 

Forestry (M.S.R.P.M., M.S.W.F.M., M.S.F., Ph.D.) 73 

Genetics and Developmental Biology (M.S., Ph.D.) 79 

Natural Resource Economics (Ph.D.) 81 

Plant and Soil Sciences (M.S.) 85 

Reproductive Physiology (M.S., Ph.D.) 90 

Eberly College of Arts and Sciences 91 

Biology (M.S., Ph.D.) 101 

Chemistry (M.S., Ph.D.) 106 

Communication Studies (M.A.) 111 

English (M.A., Ph.D.) 114 

Foreign Languages (M.A.) 121 

Geography (M.A.) 131 

Geology (M.S., Ph.D.) 136 

History (M.A. , Ph.D.) 143 

Liberal Studies (M.A.L.S.) 151 

Mathematics (M.S., Ph.D.) 153 

Philosophy (no graduate degree) 159 

Physics (M.S., Ph.D.) 160 

Political Science (M.A., Ph.D.) 165 



WVU Graduate Catalog 



Psychology (M.A., Ph.D.) 171 

Public Administration (M.P.A.) 177 

Sociology and Anthropology (M.A.) 181 

Statistics (M.S.) 184 

Women's Studies (no graduate degree) 188 

College of Business and Economics 190 

Professional Accountancy (M.P.A.) 193 

Business Administration (M.B.A.) 197 

Economics (M.A., Ph.D.) 210 

Industrial Relations (M.S.) 216 

College of Creative Arts 223 

Art(M.A., M.F.A.) 226 

Music (M.M., D.M.A., Ph.D.) 234 

Theatre (M.F.A.) 245 

School of Dentistry 252 

Dental Hygiene (M.S.) 254 

Endodontics (M.S.) 255 

Orthodontics (M.S.) 258 

College of Engineering and Mineral Resources 260 

Chemical Engineering (M.S.C.E., M.S.E., Ph.D. ) 270 

Civil and Environmental Engineering (M.S.C.E., M.S.E., Ph.D.) ....276 
Computer Science and Electrical Engineering 

(M.S.Cp.E., M.S.E.E., Ph.D.) 284 

Industrial and Management Systems Engineering 

(M.S.I. E., M.S.O.H.O.S., M.S.E., Ph.D.) 302 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

(M.S.M.E., M.S.A.E., M.S.E., Ph.D.) 310 

Mining Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.) 320 

Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering (M.S.P.N.G.E.) 325 

Safety and Environmental Management (M.S.) 328 

College of Human Resources and Education 330 

Counseling (M.A.) 338 

Education Leadership Studies (M.A.) 345 

Educational Psychology (M.A.) 349 

Elementary Education (M.A.) 353 

Reading (M.A.) 359 

Rehabilitation Counseling (M.S.) 362 

Secondary Education (M.A.) 365 

Social and Cultural Foundations 371 

Special Education (M.A.) 372 

Speech Pathology and Audiology (M.S.) 379 

Technology Education (M.A.) 384 

Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism 390 

Journalism (M.S.J) 390 

School of Medicine 400 

Anatomy (M.S., Ph.D.) 406 

Biochemistry (M.S., Ph.D.) 410 

Center on Aging 412 

Community Health Promotion (M.S.) 413 

Exercise Physiology (M.S., Ed.D.) 417 

Human Performance and Applied Exercise Science 417 

Medical Technology (M.S.) 427 

Microbiology and Immunology (M.S., Ph.D.) 431 

Occupational Therapy 420 

Pharmacology and Toxicology (M.S., Ph.D.) 435 

Physical Therapy 424 



Table of Contents 



Physiology (M.S., Ph.D.) 437 

Public Health (M. P. H.) 440 

School of Nursing 443 

Nursing (M.S.N.) 446 

School of Pharmacy 451 

Pharmaceutical Sciences (M.S., Ph.D.) 452 

School of Physical Education 455 

Physical Education (M.S., Ed.D.) 456 

School of Social Work 464 

Social Work (M.S.W.) 465 

Part 5 Special Opportunities 474 

Part 6 Index 481 

Academic Calendar 1998-99 488 

Campus Maps 490 



Correspondence 



Academic Programs 

Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs 

and Research 

West Virginia University 

P.O. Box 6203 

Morgantown, WV 26506-6203 

Phone: (304)293-5701 FAX: (304)293-7554 

Admissions, Catalogs, Records 

Office of Admissions and Records 

West Virginia University 

P.O. Box 6009 

Morgantown, WV 26506-6009 

Phone: (304)293-2121 1 -800-344- WVU1 

FAX: (304)293-3080 

www.wvu.edu 

Graduate Programs 

Office of Graduate Education 

West Virginia University 

P.O. Box 6203 

Morgantown, WV 26506-6203 

Phone: (304)293-7173 FAX: (304)293-7554 



Housing and Residence Life 

Director, Housing and Residence Life 

West Virginia University 

P.O. Box 6430 

Morgantown, WV 26506-6430 

Phone: (304)293-4491 FAX: (304)293-3369 

Scholarships, Work-Study and 
Veterans Educational Assistance 

Student Financial Aid Office 

West Virginia University 

P.O. Box 6004 

Morgantown, WV 26506-6004 

Phone: (304)293-5242 FAX: (304)293-4890 

Student Life 

Dean, Student Life 

West Virginia University 

P.O. Box 6411 

Morgantown, WV 26506-6411 

Phone: (304)293-5611 FAX: (304)293-7028 



WVU Graduate Catalog 



Part 1 Governance and Organization of WVU 

University of West Virginia System Board of Trustees 

The Board of Trustees consists of seventeen persons, including a representative for 
staff, faculty and students of the university system. Twelve trustees are appointed by the 
governor to overlapping terms of six years. Other members include the Chancellor and 
the state superintendent of school who are not entitled to vote. The campus representa- 
tives are elected by their respective constituents. The term of the classified representa- 
tive is two years and are eligible to succeed themselves. 

The Advisory Council of Classified Employees to the University System of West 
Virginia is created to provide classified employees of the University System a means of 
conveying their concerns and recommendations on employee-employer relations to the 
Board of Trustees. 

The University System includes Marshall University, Marshall University Graduate Col- 
lege, Potomac State of West Virginia University, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Charles- 
ton Division of West Virginia University, West Virginia Network for Educational 
Telecomputing, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, West Virginia University, 
West Virginia University at Parkersburg and West Virginia University Institute of Technol- 
ogy. Authority of and for the Advisory Council of Classified Employees (ACCE) is granted 
bytheWVCode18B-6-4. 

WVU Board of Advisors 

The Board of Advisors reviews and provides advice upon all University proposals in- 
volving the University's "mission, academic programs, budget, capital facilities, and such 
other matters as requested by the president of the institution or the Board of Trustees or 
otherwise assigned by law." The board also may review "all proposals regarding institu- 
tion-wide personnel policies." 

The board ordinarily has 11 members, including seven lay citizens of West Virginia, a 
University administrative officer appointed by the president, a full-time faculty member 
with at least the rank of instructor elected by the University faculty, a student in good 
academic standing chosen by the student body, and a member of the classified staff 
elected by the classified staff. When serving as the search and screening committee for 
a new University president, the Board of Advisors is expanded to seventeen members. 

Faculty Senate 

The Faculty Senate is an elected, representative body chosen by the members of the 
Faculty Assembly. The Senate exercises the legislative power of the faculty and has the 
authority to recommend general policies to the President and the Board of Trustees with 
regard to objectives and academic standards for the University. The Senate (1) consid- 
ers issues related to the organizational structure of the University with reference to aca- 
demic matters; (2) approves programs and courses, the academic calendar, and class 
scheduling; (3) examines elements of student life; (4) recommends general policies for 
convocations, lectures, entertainment, publications, radio/television, and libraries, physi- 
cal plant, and equipment; (5) recommends honorary degree candidates; and (6) regu- 
lates educational policies, programs, and functions under its purview. Decisions are sub- 
ject to review by the Faculty Assembly and approval by the President and Board of 
Trustees. 

Senators are elected by members of the University faculty. For continuity, approxi- 
mately one third of the Senate is elected each year. Senators normally serve for a term of 
three years. They are eligible to serve two consecutive full terms but then are ineligible 
for reelection until one year has elapsed. 

Governance and Organization 5 



Faculty Assembly 

The University Faculty Assembly includes the University president as presiding officer, 
vice presidents, academic deans, associate deans, professors, associate professors, 
assistant professors, and instructors holding appointments on a full-time basis. The as- 
sembly meets once a year in September. 

Student Administration 

West Virginia University also has a tradition of strong student administration that touches 
all aspects of student life and represents student opinion to the administration and fac- 
ulty. Student administration has three main units: the executive branch, the 11 -member 
board of governors, and the judicial board. Students also serve on University-wide com- 
mittees and on the Mountainlair Advisory Council. 

Staff Council 

The Staff Council is an advisory council to the president of the University and a means 
for all classified employees to express their opinions about job conditions, fringe ben- 
efits, employee-employer relations, or other areas that affect their jobs. The council is 
composed of 24 elected members. Council meetings are on the third Wednesday of 
each month. All meetings are open to the public. 

Local 814 

Local 81 4, of the Laborers' International Union of North America, AFL-CIO, represents 
employees throughout the University and it's affiliates. These employees are in craft/ 
maintenance, service, clerical and technical job categories, with a wide variety of job 
classification. Laborers' Local 81 4 is the only recognized union at the University by agree- 
ment through the Memorandum of Accord. 



West Virginia University is a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Schools. The University's educational programs are accredited by the North Central 
Association and by the appropriate accreditation agencies for professional programs. 



The 1998-2000 West Virginia University Graduate Catalog, produced by WVU Publications 
Services, is a general source of information about course offerings, academic programs and 
requirements, expenses, rules, and policies. The courses, requirements, and regulations contained 
herein are subject to continuing review and change by the University of West Virginia Board of 
Trustees, University administrators, the Faculty Senate, and the faculties of the colleges and schools 
to meet the goals and objectives of the University. The University, therefore, reserves the right to 
change, delete, supplement, or otherwise amend at any time the information, course offerings, 
requirements, rules, and policies contained herein without prior notice. 



WVU Graduate Catalog 



University of West Virginia System 
Board of Trustees 

Charles W. Manning, Chancellor 

David G. Todd, Chairman 

Cathy M. Armstrong, Vice Chairman 

Ron D. Stollings, Secretary 

Richard M. Adams 

Phyllis H. Arnold 

Cara M. Esposito 

Bertram W. Gross 

John R. Hoblitzell 

Lucia B. James 

J. Thomas Jones 

Sharon B. Lord 

Paul R. Martinelli 

A. Michael Perry 

Joseph W. Powell 

Bruce M. Van Wyk 

Clifford M. Trump, Ex-Officio 

Henry R. Marockie, Ex-Officio 

WVU Board of Advisors 

Irene Keeley, Chair 

Thomas A. Winner, Vice Chair 

Vaughn Kiger, Secretary 

Willie Akers 

Dennis M. Bone 

Kay Goodwin 

Sharon A. Nicol 

Richard Beto 

Rosemary Haggett 

Carl Roter 

Rachel Welsh 

David C. Hardesty, Jr. 

Kathryn A. Brailer, President, Potomac 

State College 
Eldon Miller, President, WVU- 

Parkersburg 
John Carrier, President, WVU Institute of 

Technology 

West Virginia University Cabinet 

Robert Biddington, Associate Vice 
President, Health Sciences 

Fred Butcher, Director, Mary Babb 
Randolph Cancer Center; Senior 
Associate Vice President, HSC 

Lawrence S. Cote, Associate Provost for 
Extension and Public Service; Direc- 
tor, Cooperative Extension Service 



Carolyn Curry, Special Assistant to the 

President for Communication 
Robert D'Alessandri, Vice President, 

Health Sciences; Dean, School of 

Medicine 
Russell Dean, Associate Provost 

for Curriculum and Instruction 
Peggy Douglas, Executive Officer for 

Social Justice 
Stephen L. Douglas, Executive Vice 

President, WVU Alumni Association 
Kenneth Gray, Vice President for 

Student Affairs 
James K. Hackett, Associate Vice 

President for Finance 
Hilda Heady, Associate Vice President 

for Rural Health 
David C. Hardesty, Jr., President 
Hayward Helmick, Staff Council 

President 
Scott Kelley, Vice President, Administra- 
tion, Finance and Human Resources 
Gerald Lang, Provost and Vice President 

for Academic Affairs 
Michael J. Lewis, Associate Vice 

President for Health Sciences, 

Charleston Division 
Nancy L. Lohmann, Senior Associate 

Provost for Academic Affairs 
Bruce McClymonds, President of WVU 

Hospitals 
William Reeves, Provost for Research 

and Economic Development 
Herman L. Moses, Dean of Student 

Affairs 
Terry Ondreyka, Associate Vice Presi- 
dent, Finance 
Kenneth Orgill, Associate Provost for 

Information Technology 
Virginia Petersen, Special Assistant to 

the President and Provost 
Jon A. Reed, Executive Officer and 

General Counsel 
James A. Robinson, President, WVU 

Foundation, Inc. 
James Shumway, Faculty Senate Chair 
David Satterfield, Chief of Staff 
George R. Spratto, Dean, School of 

Pharmacy 
Rachel Welsh, Student Body President 
Nancy Wood, Executive Assistant to the 

President 



Trustees, Advisors, Cabinet 



Assistant Vice Presidents 
Johnnie Byrd. Computer and Information 

Resources 
Ann Chester. Health Sciences 
Drayton Justus. Human Resources 
Amir Mohammadi. Student Affairs 
Stephen Showers. Facilities and Services 
Wesley Williams. Jr.. Faculty Development 
C.B. Wilson. Faculty Development 

Deans 

Aerospace Studies. Col. Richard Evans 

Carruth Center for Counseling and 

Psychological Services. Catherine Yura 
College of Agnculture and Forestry. 

Rosemary Haggett 
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences. 

M. Duane Nellis 
College of Business and Economics. 

Sydney V. Stem 
Cortege of Creative Arts. Philip Faini 
School of Dentistry. Robert Hornbrook 
College of Engineering and Mineral 

Resources. Allen Cogley 
College of Human Resources and 

Education. William Deaton 
Periey Isaac Reed School of Journalism. 

William T. Slater 
College of Law. (Intenm) John Fisher 
Library Services. Ruth M. Jackson 
School of Medicine. Robert D'Alessandri 
School of Nursing. E. Jane Martin 
School of Pharmacy. George R. Spratto 
School of Physical Education. Dana Brooks 
School of Social Work. Karen V. Harper 
Student Affairs. Herman L. Moses 

Directors 

- - T EET r : :' = ~ . e~~ 'f V: -:r 
Academic Computing. Donald McLaughlin 
ADA Compliance. Barbara T. Judy 
Administrative Information Systems. 

Robert Paulson 
Administrative Services. Jen Ireland 
Admissions and Records. Evie Brantmayer 
Athletics. Edward M. Pastilong 
Budget Planning. Narvel G. Weese. Jr. 
Bureau of Business and Economic 

Research. Tom. S. Witt 
Career Services Center. Robert L. Kent 
Carruth Center for Counseling and 
Psychological Services. Cathenne Yura 



Center for Aging/Education Unit, Hana 

Hermanova 
Center for Black Culture and Research. 

Katherine Bankhole 
Center for Women's Studies. Helen M. 

Bannan 
Concurrent Engineering Research Center 

(CERC). Ramana Reddy 
Environmental Health and Safety. 

Roger L. Pugh 
Extended Learning, Sue Day-Perroots 
Financial Aid Office. Brenda Thompson 
Graduate Education. (Interim) Bob Stitzel 
Health Sciences. Robert Biddington 
Housing and Residence Life. Carole Henry 
Human Resources. Myrtho Blanchard 
Humanities and Social Sciences. Esther 

Gottlieb 
Information Technology and Customer 

Service. Lewis McDaniel 
Institute of the History of Technology and 
Industrial Archaeology. Emory L. Kemp 
Institute of Occupational Environmental 

Health. Alan M. Ducatman 
Institute for Public Affairs. Robert Dilger 
Institutional Analysis and Planning. 

Kathleen K. Bissonnette 
Internal Auditing. William R. Quigley 
International Programs. Daniel Weiner 
Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center. 

Fred Butcher 
Military Science. LTC Margaret M. Bahnsen 
Mountainlair. Michael Ellington 
National Research Center for Coal and 

Energy. Richard A. Bajura 
Network Services. Virgil Boerio 
News and Information Services. 

Rebecca Lofstead 
Physical Plant. Robert Cremer 
Potomac State College. Kathryn Brailer 
Printing Services. Paul H. Stevenson 
Program Development for Science and 

Engineering. Richard Kouzes 
Procurement Services. Ed Ames 
Publications Services. Angela Caudill 
Public Safety and Transportation Services. 

Bobby Roberts 
Radio and Television Services. 

(Interim) John Duwall 
Regional Research Institute. (Interim) 

Luc Ansel in 



WVU Graduate Catalog 



Research Facilities Office. James R. Shaub 
Sponsored Programs. William W. Reeves 
Student Activities and Educational 

Programming. David H. Taylor 
Telecommunications and IT Business 

Services. Timothy Williams 
Trademark Licensing. Rob Cleveland 
Undergraduate Academic Services Center. 

Nicholas Evans 
UACDD. Ashok Dey 
University Honors Program and Governor's 

School for Science and Math. 

William E. Collins 
WV Network. Henry Blosser 



Chaired and Distinguished 
Professors 

Daniel Banks. M.D.. N. LeRoy Lapp 

Professor of Pulmonary and Critical Care 

Medicine 
Shawn Chillag. M.D.. Warren Point Chair 

of Internal Medicine 
Franklin D. Cleckley. Arthur B. Hodges 

Professor of Law 
Patrick Conner. Eberly College of Arts and 

Sciences Centennial Professor of English 
Echol "Bud" E. Cook. George Berry Chair 

of Engineering 
Bernard R. Cooper. C.W. Benedum 

Professor of Physics 
Naresh Dalai. Eberly College of Arts and 

Sciences Centennial Professor of 

Chemistry 
Charles R. DiSalvo. Woodrow A. Potesta 

Professor of Law 
Georg Eifert. Eberly Professor of Clinical 

Psychology 
William W. Fleming. Mylan Chair of 

Pharmacology and Toxicology 
Gabor B. Fodor. Centennial Professor of 

Chemistry. Emeritus 
Ruel E. Foster. C.W. Benedum Professor 

of English. Emeritus 
Mathis Frick. Orlando Gabriele Chair of 

Radiology 
Frank Gagliano. C.W. Benedum 

Professor of Theatre 
Mark Gibson. M.D.. OB GYN. Margaret 

Sanger Chair of Family Planning and 

Reproductive Physiology 



Rakesh K. Gupta. GE Plastics Professor 

of Materials Engineering 
Robert Hoeldtke. Charles E. Compton 

Chair of Nutrition 
Ronald L. Klein. Power Professor of 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Davied Kreulen. Edward J. Van Liere 

Professor of Physiology 
Ks-^on Lattal. Eberly College of Arts and 

Sciences Centennial Professor of 

Psychology 
Ronald Lewis. Eberly Professor of 

American History 
Donald E. Lively. William J. Maier. Jr.. 

Visiting Chair of Law 
Robert Moss Markley. Jackson Chair of 

English 
Robert S. Maust. Louis F. Tanner 

Professor of Public Accounting 
Brian McHale. Eberly Professor of 

American Literature 
Thomas P. Meloy. C.W. Benedum 

Professor of Mineral Processing 
William H. Miernyk. C.W. Benedum 

Professor of Economics. Emeritus 
Syd S. Peng. Charles T. Holland Professor 

of Mining Engineering 
Hayne W. Reese. Centennial Professor of 

Psychology 
Mohindar Seehra. Eberly Professor of 

Physics (Materials Science) 
Kenneth Showalter. Eberly Professor of 

Chemistry 



Chaired and Distinguished Professors 9 



WVU Degree Programs 

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences 

Agricultural and Resource Economics M.S. 

Agricultural and Environmental Education B.S.Agr M.S. 

Agricultural Sciences Ph.D. 

Agriculture M.Agr. 

Animal and Veterinary Sciences B.S., B.S.Agr M.S. 

Family Resources B.S.Fam.Res M.S. 

Forest Resources Management B.S.F. 

Forest and Consumer Sciences B.S.F. & C.S. .. M.S.F & C.S. 

Forestry M.S.F. 

Landscape Architecture B.S.L.A. 

Natural Resource Economics Ph.D. 

Plant and Soil Sciences B.S./B.S.Agr M.S. 

Recreation and Parks Management B.S.R M.S. 

Resource Management B.S., B.S.Agr. 

Wildlife and Fisheries Resources B.S M.S. 

Wood Industries B.S.F. 

Eberly College of Arts and Sciences 

Biology B.A 

Chemistry B.A., B.S 

Communication Studies B.A 

Economics B.A. 

English B.A 

Foreign Languages B.A 

Geography B.A 

Geology B.A., B.S 

History B.A 

Interdepartmental Studies B.A. 

Liberal Studies M 

Mathematics B.A 

Philosophy B.A. 

Physics B.A., B.S 

Political Science B.A 

Psychology B.A 

Public Administration M.P.A. 

Sociology and Anthropology B.A M.A. 

Statistics B.A M.S. 

Board of Regents Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Regents Bachelor of Arts B.A. 

College of Business and Economics 

Accounting B.S.B.Ad. 

Business Administration M.B.A. 

Business Management B.S.B.Ad. 

Economics B.S M.A Ph.D. 

Finance B.S.B.Ad. 

Industrial Relations M.S. 

Marketing B.S.B.Ad. 

Professional Accountancy M.P.A. 



M.S 

M.S 


Ph.D. 

Ph.D. 


M.A. 
M.A 


Ph.D 


M.A. 
M.A. 
M.S 


Ph.D 


M.A 


Ph.D 


,LS. 
M.S 

M.S 


Ph.D 

Ph.D 


M.A 


Ph.D 


M.A 


Ph.D 



1 WVU Graduate Catalog 



College of Creative Arts 

Art M.A. 

Music B.M M.M D.M.A., 

Ph.D. 

Theatre B.F.A M.F.A. 

Visual Art B.F.A M.F.A. 

School of Dentistry 

Dental Hygiene B.S M.S. 

Dentistry D.D.S. 

Dental Specialties M.S. 

College of Engineering and Mineral Resources 

Engineering M.S.E Ph.D. 

Aerospace Engineering B.S.A.E M.S.A.E. 

Chemical Engineering B.S.Ch.E M.S.Ch.E. 

Civil Engineering B.S.C.E M.S.C.E. 

Computer Engineering B.S.Cp.E. 

Electrical Engineering B.S.E.E M.S.E.E. 

Engineering of Mines B.S.E.M M.S.E.M. 

Industrial Engineering B.S.I.E M.S. I.E. 

Mechanical Engineering B.S.M.E M.S.M.E. 

Mineral Engineering Ph.D. 

Occupational Hygiene and Occupational Safety M.S. 

Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering B.S.PNGE M.S PNGE. 

Safety and Environmental Management M.S. 

College of Human Resources and Education 

Education Ed.D. 

Counseling M.A. 

Counseling Psychology Ph.D. 

Education Leadership M.A. 

Educational Psychology M.A. 

Elementary Education B.S. E.Ed M.A. 

Reading M.A. 

Rehabilitation Counseling M.S. 

Secondary Education B.S. S.Ed M.A. 

Special Education M.A. 

Speech Pathology and Audiology B.S M.S. 

Technology Education M.A. 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

Genetics and Developmental Biology M.S Ph.D. 

Liberal Studies M.A.L.S. 

Multidisciplinary Studies B.A. 

Reproductive Physiology M.S Ph.D. 

Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism 

Journalism B.S.J M.S.J. 

College of Law 

Law J.D. 



Degree Programs 1 1 



School of Medicine 

Anatomy M.S Ph.D. 

Biochemistry (Medical) M.S Ph.D. 

Community Health Promotion M.S. 

Exercise Physiology B.S M.S. 

Medical Technology B.S M.S. 

Medicine M.D. 

Microbiology and Immunology M.S Ph.D. 

Occupational Therapy M.O.T. 

Pharmacology and Toxicology M.S Ph.D. 

Physical Therapy M.P.T. 

Physiology (Medical) M.S Ph.D. 

Public Health M.P.H. 

School of Nursing 

Nursing B.S.N M.S.N. 

School of Pharmacy 

Pharmaceutical Sciences M.S Ph.D. 

Pharmacy Pharm. D. 

School of Physical Education 

Physical Education B.S. P. Ed M.S Ed.D. 

Sport Studies B.S. P. Ed. 

School of Social Work 

Social Work B.S.W M.S.W. 



Part 2 Graduate Education at West Virginia University 

The origin of graduate education can be traced to the medieval universities of Europe; 
the goal for graduate study has remained unchanged over the intervening centuries. A 
student undertakes such study in order to gain a deeper knowledge in a particular aca- 
demic discipline and to become able to demonstrate to the faculty and practitioners in 
the field the attained mastery of knowledge. Consequently, graduate study cannot be 
defined primarily in terms of semester hours of course work beyond the baccalaureate, 
even though minimum course work requirements are commonly specified for graduate 
degrees. Minimum requirements set the lower limit for an integrated plan of study. 

Graduate students are expected to become participating members of the University 
community and are encouraged to attend the lectures presented by visiting scholars, to 
listen to academic discussions of their faculty, to serve on departmental committees, and 
to study with their fellow graduate students. The purpose of residency requirements 
is to promote such participation in the academic affairs of the University. 

Seminars 

Graduate students enrolled in a graduate program within West Virginia University are 
expected to participate in a seminar course throughout their graduate career. Depending 
on the objectives set by a particular graduate program, seminars may: 

• Provide an opportunity for the student to be exposed to a variety of topics. 

• Give the student insight into the methods by which to communicate the significance 
of their research. 

• Allow the student to hear outside speakers, or 



1 2 WVU Graduate Catalog 



• Engender discussion with faculty concerning research and the development of re- 
search methodology. 

Minimum Admission Standards 

At WVU, the minimum standards for admission to graduate study are set by the 
University Graduate Council. Beyond this point, however, faculty members in a given 
graduate program have complete control over who is to be admitted to undertake gradu- 
ate study under their supervision; and ultimately it is they who certify which students 
have demonstrated sufficient mastery of the discipline to qualify for a graduate degree. 
While a student may be admitted for the purpose of enrolling in advanced course work, 
only the program faculty may grant permission for the pursuit of a degree. Likewise, a 
student will not be recommended for a degree until the graduate faculty of a program has 
indicated in writing that the student has gained the desired knowledge. 

Policies 

The graduate catalog sets forth the policies and rules for graduate education. It is 
essential that all students beginning study at the graduate level become familiar with 
regulations for graduate study in general as well as with the requirements of their own 
programs — both of which are detailed in this catalog. Each student should request a 
graduate catalog when beginning graduate study and become conversant with its 
contents. 

Academic Common Market 

West Virginia provides its residents the opportunity, through the Academic Common 
Market (ACM) and through contract programs, to pursue numerous academic programs 
not available within the state. Both programs permit West Virginians to enter out-of-state 
institutions at reduced tuition rates. Contract programs have been established for study 
in optometry, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. ACM programs are restricted to West 
Virginia residents who have been accepted for admission to one of the specific programs 
at designated out-of-state institutions. Through reciprocal agreement, WVU allows resi- 
dents of states within the ACM to enroll in graduate and undergraduate programs on a 
resident tuition basis. 

Further information may be obtained through the Associate Provost for Curriculum 
and Instruction, Stewart Hall, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6203, Morgantown, WV 
26506-6203; or by calling (304) 293-2661 . Application must be made through the higher 
education authority of the state of residence. For West Virginia residents, this authority is 
the University of West Virginia Board of Trustees, 950 Kanawha Boulevard East, 
Charleston, WV 25301. 

Organization of Graduate Education 

West Virginia University, which is both the comprehensive and land-grant university in 
the West Virginia system of higher education, offers graduate work leading to 78 master's 
degrees and 32 doctoral degrees. The graduate programs are administered by 1 4 schools 
and colleges of the University and by some inter-unit committees. 

Office of Graduate Education 

The director of the Office of Graduate Education oversees the policies governing gradu- 
ate education, monitors the quality of graduate programs, and sets goals for enhancing 
graduate education at West Virginia University. The director of graduate education re- 
ports to the associate provost for curriculum and instruction. The associate provost for 
curriculum and instruction derives his authority from the provost and vice president for 
academic affairs and works closely with the vice president for Health Sciences. 

Graduate Education 13 



Graduate Council 

The University Graduate Council consists of twelve elected faculty representatives from 
the schools and colleges offering graduate programs and five ex-officio nonvoting mem- 
bers representing the provost, the director of graduate education, the vice president for 
health sciences, the senate executive committee, and the graduate and professional stu- 
dent association. The council derives its authority from the faculty and from the pro- 
vost and vice president for academic affairs and research. This body formulates, 
reviews, and recommends University-wide graduate education policies. The council re- 
views proposals for new graduate programs, evaluates major revisions in graduate 
curricula, coordinates periodic program reviews, establishes the University criteria for gradu- 
ate faculty membership, and considers such other matters affecting graduate education as 
are brought to the council by an administrative officer of the University, a graduate faculty 
member, or a graduate student. The duties of the University Graduate Council include 
responsibility for graduate programs both on- and off-campus. 

Schools and Colleges 

Schools and colleges manage most of the day-to-day operation of graduate educa- 
tion. They determine the level of participation by individual faculty members, specify 
requirements for programs under their jurisdiction, and certify students for graduation. 

Graduate Faculty 

Members of the graduate faculty continue to play the most important role in 
graduate education. They are responsible for program content, they serve on 
graduate student committees, and they assure the quality of preparation of the 
University's graduates. 

Regular Membership 

• Regular members may chair students' committees or direct master's and doctoral 
research, theses, and dissertations. 

• Regular members must hold appointments in tenure track positions. 

• Regular members must hold either a terminal degree or have demonstrated equiva- 
lent scholarly or creative achievement as defined by their school or college. The 
definition of equivalent credentials must include, as a minimum, the attainment of 
the rank of associate professor. 

• Regular members must present evidence of continuing scholarly research, or cre- 
ative activity. 

Schools and colleges set and publish quantitative and qualitative criteria regarding 
scholarly activity. These criteria are to be applied for the appointment as well as continu- 
ation of graduate faculty membership. These initial criteria and any subsequent amend- 
ments or changes are subject to approval of the University Graduate Council and 
usually include many of the following: publication in major peer review journals, publica- 
tion of books and book chapters, invited and/or competitively-selected presentations of 
scholarly work at national and international meetings, and/or presentations and perfor- 
mance of artistic work at professionally-recognized affairs. 

Associate Membership 

Associate members may perform the same function as regular members with the ex- 
ception of chairing students' committees or directing master's theses and doctoral dis- 
sertations (or equivalent). It is the prerogative of the schools and colleges to establish 
and publish their own criteria for associate membership. These initial criteria and any 
subsequent amendments or changes are subject to approval of the University Graduate 

1 4 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Council and should include one or more of the following requirements: research activity, 
scholarly publications, artistic performances or presentations, teaching experience par- 
ticularly on a graduate level, and service on previous graduate committees. 

Exceptions 

The following individuals also must meet the same criteria (regular or associate) for 
review, approval, and continuation as do tenure track graduate faculty: 

• Visiting professors may be appointed as members of the graduate faculty for the 
term of their appointments but cannot chair committees. 

• Faculty holding non-tenure track appointments may be considered for graduate fac- 
ulty membership. 

• Emeritus faculty members may remain on the graduate faculty, subject to school of 
college review. 

• Off-campus professionals willing to participate in graduate education may be ac- 
ceptable as graduate faculty but may not chair student committees (exceptions may 
be approved by the director of graduate education). 

• Individuals holding faculty appointments in institutions participating in cooperative 
doctoral programs may be considered graduate faculty, subject to school or college 
review. 

Degree Candidates 

Normally, no candidate for a degree at WVU may be a regular or associate member of 
the graduate faculty. Individuals seeking exceptions to this policy must submit a petition 
to the director of graduate education. 

Evaluation of Graduate Faculty 

Individuals interested in appointment to the graduate faculty must request their evalu- 
ation for initial membership. Associate members interested in reclassification as regular 
members must request evaluation. Faculty seeking graduate faculty status must first be 
evaluated by the school or college in which they hold their primary faculty appointment. 
If a faculty member holds a secondary appointment in another school or college or wishes 
to have graduate faculty status in a second school or college, this is permissible; how- 
ever, faculty may not be designated a regular graduate faculty member in any school or 
college if such a status is not held in the primary school or college. 

Time Schedule 

Schools and colleges should establish an appropriate time schedule for evaluating 
faculty for initial appointment to the graduate faculty and for upgrading graduate faculty 
status. All graduate faculty are reviewed annually. The annual review is intended to as- 
sist graduate faculty members in gauging their continued progress in scholarship, re- 
search, or creative activity. The review process for graduate faculty membership 
should coincide with the annual review process of all faculty. Schools and colleges 
determine the appropriate mechanisms by which faculty are reviewed (School or 
College Graduate Council, Promotion and Tenure Committee, etc.). The results are placed 
in the individual's personnel file. 

Continuance 

Once every three years, the graduate faculty review of individuals must be ac- 
companied by a decision to continue or discontinue their current level of member- 
ship. A faculty member whose graduate faculty membership is discontinued or changed 
from regular to associate status will be permitted to complete current responsibilities but 
may only assume additional responsibilities which are consistent with the new status. 

Graduate Education 1 5 



Appeals 

Appeals regarding graduate faculty membership classification shall be handled through 
grievance procedures identified in Policy Bulletin 36. Exception to any of the above must 
be approved by the University Graduate Council. 

Faculty Pursuing Advanced Degrees 

No faculty member holding instructor or professorial rank in a program unit (depart- 
ment, division, interdisciplinary committee, etc.) may be admitted to a graduate degree 
program offered through that unit. Only those people with a rank of teaching fellow, 
lecturer, etc. can simultaneously pursue a degree in their own unit. Faculty holding 
instructor or professorial rank may be admitted to a graduate degree program in another 
program unit. 

Application 

Graduate study at WVU can be compared to a contractual arrangement between the 
student and the graduate faculty of the University. The student's rights, privileges, 
obligations, and responsibilities are contained in the graduate catalog, the plan of 
study, and, if research is one of the degree program requirements, the prospectus. 
Although not contracts in the formal legal sense, they are agreements between the Uni- 
versity and a student for the accomplishment of planned educational goals. 

The WVU Graduate Catalog, in effect when a student begins work toward an 
advanced degree, constitutes the agreement between the student and West 
Virginia University. If there are major changes in the catalog during the course of a 
student's studies, a student, with the approval of his/her advisor, may agree to meet the 
conditions of the graduate catalog of a later year. An agreement to change to a later 
catalog is an agreement to meet all the conditions of the later edition. Students 
must abide by catalog changes if the changes were promulgated by the Board of 
Trustees or local, state, or federal law. 

GRE/GMAT 

Many programs at WVU require graduate record examination (GRE or GMAT) scores 
from all applicants, but in no program is an examination score the sole criterion for ad- 
mission. Some programs require both the general and the appropriate advanced tests 
before considering an applicant for admission. Other programs require different tests, 
such as the Miller Analogies. Specific admission requirements are found in the pro- 
gram sections of this catalog. Students should take the tests required for their pro- 
spective graduate majors before enrollment in graduate studies. If GRE or GMAT tests 
are required, the applicant should request the Educational Testing Service to forward 
scores to the WVU Office of Admissions and Records. (The code identifying WVU to the 
GRF is 5904). In addition, students are encouraged to send a machine reproduced copy 
of their GRE or GMAT scores, if available, along with their initial application to the Office 
of Admissions and Records in order to facilitate the WVU evaluation process. 

Applications to take the GRE or GMAT must be mailed to the Educational Testing 
Service, Princeton, NJ 08540. Information about the Miller Analogies Test may be ob- 
tained from the psychology department or the counseling service of the applicant's un- 
dergraduate institution. At WVU, call the Student Counseling Service at (304) 293-4431 . 

Initial Inquiry 

Prospective graduate students are urged to apply for admission as early as possible. 
The first inquiry from a person interested in a degree program should request information 
from the department, division, school, or college offering the program. The reply to such 
an inquiry will include instructions for applying to the particular program. 

1 6 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Forms/Fees 

In all cases, application for admission to graduate study must be made on standard 
forms provided by the Office of Admissions and Records. The completed form may be 
returned to the Office of Admissions and Records and must be accompanied by payment 
of a nonrefundable special service fee. 

Transcripts 

Applicants must at the same time arrange for an official transcript to be sent directly to 
the Office of Admissions and Records by the registrar or records office of the previous 
colleges and universities attended by the applicant. Transcripts should be requested 
from all institutions attended in the course of undergraduate or graduate study. Tran- 
scripts received by the Office of Admissions and Records become the property of WVU. 
No one is admitted to graduate study who does not hold a baccalaureate degree. 

Admission 

If an applicant meets the minimum admission requirements of WVU, a copy of the 
application is forwarded to the faculty of the program of interest by the Office of Admis- 
sions and Records. Any graduate degree program is permitted to set admission require- 
ments beyond the minimum admission standards of the University. No one can pursue 
an advanced degree at WVU unless admitted to the appropriate degree program. A 
student who wishes to take courses after completing a degree must submit a new appli- 
cation and pay the nonrefundable service fee. 

Admission Denial 

If an application for admission into a graduate program is denied, the applicant may 
request the reasons for refusal of admission by writing to the program coordinator. It 
should be noted that meeting the minimum requirements for admission into a graduate 
program does not ensure admission. Many programs, due to resource limitations, re- 
strict the number of admissions by selecting the top candidates among the qualified 
applicants. An applicant can appeal to the program for reconsideration if he/she can 
document factual errors in processing the application or if the decision was deemed 
arbitrary and capricious or discriminatory in nature. 

If the matter is not resolved satisfactorily within 30 calendar days of the receipt of the 
appeal by the program, the applicant may appeal to the dean of the college/school. The 
decision of the dean, as the Provost's designee, shall be rendered within 20 calendar 
days of the receipt of the appeal and is final. 

Non-degree Applicants 

Students not wishing to pursue an advanced degree may apply for admission as non- 
degree graduate students. Applicants must complete the standard application form, pay 
the nonrefundable special service fee, state the area of intended study, and present 
evidence of a baccalaureate degree. 

Second Review 

Any applicant who is refused admission may have his or her application reviewed 
again within a year instead of submitting a new application form and fee. Any applicant 
who fails to enroll within a year after acceptance must reapply in the regular manner for 
consideration for a subsequent year. 



Application 1 7 



Reapplication 

When students graduate or complete the program for which they applied, they must 
reapply and be readmitted before taking further course work at WVU. This policy as- 
sures that the University is informed of students' objectives and assigns them an ap- 
propriate advisor. Students are assessed a service fee for each new application. 

Readmission 

Degree students who have been inactive two or more years must reapply for admis- 
sion by completing the graduate application process. 

Continuance 

Master's degree students are permitted to continue in a program for a maxi- 
mum of eight years under their original application. Students who have not been 
active students for two years must reapply and be readmitted. The application 
fee is assessed. 

Concurrent or Additional Master's Degree 

University policy permits students to obtain more than one master's degree. In these 
cases, a separate application is required for each program. Each application must be 
accompanied by payment of a nonrefundable special service fee. 

A student desiring to obtain more than one master's degree must successfully com- 
plete sufficient additional credit hours to constitute 75 percent of the credit hours 
required by the additional master's degree program. An individual graduate unit may 
require a higher percentage of credit to be earned under its direction. 

International Students 

West Virginia University is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant foreign 
nationals as students. International students wishing to enroll for graduate work at WVU 
must comply with the stated academic requirements for admission and with certain addi- 
tional academic and nonacademic requirements. 

Letter of Inquiry 

International applicants should forward a letter of inquiry one year before they 
intend to begin study in the United States. The University receives a large number 
of applications from international students. For this reason and because of the time 
required for the student to make visa and financial arrangements, April 1 has been 
established as a deadline after which applications cannot be guaranteed consideration 
for fall admission. International students applying for admission to West Virginia 
University must submit the following: 

• A completed international student admission application. 

• The mandatory application fee. 

• The official results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). TOEFL 
results must be sent directly to WVU by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). 

• Original or certified copies of the applicant's official academic record in the original 
language of issue. Applicants who have studied in the United States are required 
to have the institutions send an official transcript directly to WVU; 

• Original or certified copy of all Certificates or Diplomas in the original language of 
issue. 

• Official English translations of the applicant's academic record and Certificates/ 
Diplomas 



1 8 WVU Graduate Catalog 



All of the items listed above should be sent to the Office of Admissions and Records, 
West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6009, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6009. All 
material must be received by the application deadline. All application materials should 
be submitted at one time if possible; TOEFL scores and official transcripts from 
institutions within the United States should be requested so that these materials arrive 
at WVU at about the same date as the other application materials. Incomplete applica- 
tions can not be guaranteed consideration for the desired semester. Applicants are 
encouraged to contact the academic program of interest for information about require- 
ments other than those listed above. 

Financial Documents/Student Visa 

International students requiring a form 1-20 or IAP-66 for student or exchange visa 
must provide certification of adequate financial resources. Generally, the student must 
provide an official bank statement showing the availability of the appropriate funds. If a 
private sponsor will be the student's source of support, the sponsor must submit a letter 
showing intent to sponsor and an official bank statement showing the availability of the 
appropriate funds. Other forms of support could include sponsorship certifications from 
the student's government or other sponsoring agency. In all cases, original or certified 
copies of financial/sponsorship documents must be submitted before the 1-20 or IAP- 
66 can be issued. 

English Proficiency/TOEFL Scores 

All applicants whose first language is not English must provide proof of English lan- 
guage proficiency. West Virginia University uses the Test of English as a Foreign Lan- 
guage (TOEFL) as the measure of English language proficiency. A score of 550 on the 
TOEFL is the minimum required of all such applicants. Applicants must make arrange- 
ments to take the TOEFL well in advance of the desired date of enrollment at WVU. 
Information about registration for the TOEFL can be obtained by writing to the Educa- 
tional Testing Service, P.O. Box 6154, Princeton, NJ 08541-6154, USA, or by contact- 
ing the local office of the United States Information Service (USIS). 

Applicants who have received a high school diploma or a bachelor's degree in the 
United States need not submit TOEFL results. 

Intensive English Program 

In some cases, it may be possible to consider applications for students who lack ad- 
equate TOEFL scores and will enroll in the West Virginia University Intensive English Pro- 
gram. Such applicants must contact the Intensive English Program directly and notify the 
Office of Admissions and Records of their intentions. Applicants for graduate programs 
should also notify the academic department of interest of their intentions. Admission to the 
Intensive English Program does not guarantee admission to the University or to a 
specific program of study. Inquiries about the Intensive English Program should be 
directed to the Intensive English Program, Department of Foreign Languages, West 
Virginia University, P.O. Box 6298, Morgantown, WV 26506-6298. 

Official Documents 

West Virginia University requires the submission of original academic documents or 
certified copies of the original academic documents from institutions located outside of 
the United States. The required documents include the official academic record (show- 
ing course titles, dates courses were taken, and grades received) and diplomas or certifi- 
cates showing the degree awarded. These documents must be in the original language 



International Students 19 



of issue. Official English translations must be provided with the official academic creden- 
tials in the original language. Any translation of a document must be a literal, word-for- 
word translation and must indicate actual grades received, not an interpretation of the 
grades. 

Academic Records 

Applicants for graduate programs must submit academic records from all post-sec- 
ondary education. In some cases, it may be necessary for graduate applicants to submit 
records from secondary school. 

Documents received by West Virginia University cannot be returned to the applicant. It 
is therefore recommended that students who have only their original academic docu- 
ments submit certified copies of their credentials with their application. 

Applicants who are currently enrolled in an institution and who can not submit the final 
academic record and certification of degree may be granted admission if the incomplete 
record indicates that the applicant will unquestionably meet WVU admission standards. 
Final admission, however, can not be approved until the complete academic record and 
certification of degree have been received and evaluated by the Office of Admissions 
and Records. 

Transferring Within USA 

International students applying to transfer from schools within the United States are 
not permitted to register at WVU until they have complied with all transfer procedures as 
required by the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). 

Upon arrival on the campus, the student must be prepared to present the 1-20 or IAP 
66 to the international student advisor for formal processing. No student should move 
to Morgantown without having received an assurance of admission and immigra- 
tion documents from WVU. 

Transfer Procedures 

A student wishing to transfer to WVU from another institution should follow the same 
application procedures as those outlined for other new students. 

A student wishing to apply credit earned at another institution of higher education to a 
master's degree at WVU must obtain a transfer of graduate credit form from the Office of 
Admissions and Records. This form requires the signature of the student's unit chairper- 
son or designee. The student must also have an official transcript from the other institu- 
tion sent to the Office of Admissions and Records. Only credit earned at institutions 
accredited (e.g., North Central accreditation) at the graduate level may be transferred. 
Non-degree graduate students are not permitted to transfer credit to WVU from another 
institution. 

Credit Hours 

A maximum of 12 semester hours from other institutions may be transferred for 
credit at WVU in master's degree programs requiring 30 to 41 semester hours. 

Eighteen semester hours can be accepted for master's degree programs requiring 42 or 
more semester hours. Individual graduate programs may accept fewer credit hours. Per- 
mission forms to apply for transfer credit must be obtained from and returned to the 
Office of Admissions and Records. It is strongly recommended that students have trans- 
fer credit approved prior to enrolling in course work. 



20 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Transfer to Another Program 

A student may initiate a transfer to another program by contacting the dean's office of 
the school or college where enrolled. Following the student's request, the dean's office 
will send the student's record to the school or college that the student wishes to enter. 
The school or college receiving the record is required to acknowledge receipt of the 
record and notify the Office of Admissions and Records of the status of the student's 
application within 30 days. If a student is accepted by the new school or college, the 
school or college retains the student's record and notifies the student of acceptance. If a 
student is rejected, he or she is notified of such action, and the student's record is re- 
turned to the original school or college. The Office of Admissions and Records is respon- 
sible for updating students' records to reflect new majors and new advisors. 

Internal Credit Transfers 

When a student transfers from one unit or program to another unit or program within 
the University, the faculty of the new unit determines if any credit earned under the guid- 
ance of the prior unit may be applied to a degree, certificate, or other educational offering 
of the new unit. 

Programs may establish admission requirements in addition to those set by the 
University Graduate Council, such as a higher grade-point average, the submission of 
scores on standardized tests, and the receipt of letters of recommendation. 

Admission to Graduate Study 

Classifications 

Regular graduate students are degree-seeking students who meet all the crite- 
ria for regular admission to a program of their choice. The student must possess a 
baccalaureate degree from a college or university, must have at least a grade-point aver- 
age of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale, have met all the criteria established by the degree program, 
and be under no requirements to make up deficiencies. 

A student may be admitted as provisional by any unit when the student pos- 
sesses a baccalaureate degree but clearly does not meet the criteria for regular 
admission. The student may have incomplete credentials, deficiencies to make up, or 
may have an undergraduate scholastic record which shows promise, but less than the 
2.75 grade-point average required for regular admission. 

A non-degree student is a student not admitted to a program. Admission as a non- 
degree student does not guarantee admission to any course or program. The reasons 
for non-degree admission may be late application, incomplete credentials, scholarship 
deficiencies, or lack of a degree objective. Even though a non-degree student has not 
been admitted to a graduate program, a unit may allow a non-degree student to enroll in 
its courses. To be admitted as a non-degree student, a student must only present 
evidence of a baccalaureate degree and a 2.50 grade-point average, but the stu- 
dent must obtain a 2.50 grade-point average on the first 12 credit hours of course 
work and maintain this average as long as enrolled, (see p. 23 "Previous Graduate 
Study" for an exception to this rule.) To be eligible to enter a degree program, the student 
must maintain a minimum of a 2.75 grade-point average on all course work taken since 
admission as a graduate student. 

The standards cited are the minimum standards established by the University. Indi- 
vidual academic units or graduate programs may establish higher standards. 

Academic Standards 

The minimum academic standards for the different classifications are: To be in good 
standing, regular students must obtain a 2.75 grade-point average in the first 12 

Admission 21 



hours of graduate study and maintain this average throughout the time they are 
enrolled in graduate work. A student failing to achieve this standard will be placed on 
probation and must achieve a cumulative grade-point average of 2.75 by the end of the 
next enrollment at West Virginia University. In the case of a part-time graduate student, a 
2.75 cumulative grade-point average must be obtained in the next nine hours of gradu- 
ate study. A student who cannot attain the required average will be suspended. 

A provisional student has been admitted to the University with one or more deficien- 
cies. Consequently, by completion of the 18th credit hour, the student must meet 
the provisions stated by the department and attain a minimum grade-point aver- 
age of 2.75. A student who fails to meet the provisions of admission or who fails to 
achieve the required grade-point average will be suspended. Students who meet the 
provisions of admission and the required grade-point average will be reclassified as regular 
students, and the regulations governing good standing for regular students will apply. 

To be in good standing, a non-degree student must obtain a 2.50 grade-point 
average in the first 12 hours of graduate study and maintain this average through- 
out the time enrolled in graduate work. A student failing to achieve this standard will 
be placed on probation and must achieve a cumulative grade-point average of 2.50 by 
the end of the next enrollment (or nine credit hours for part-time students) at West 
Virginia University. Students who cannot attain the required average will be suspended. 
A non-degree student who later wishes to apply for admission to a degree program must 
have achieved a minimum grade-point average of 2.75 on all course work taken since 
admission as a graduate student in order to be considered. 

Enrollment Regulations of Non-degree Students 

Non-degree students may enroll in any course in the University for which they have 
the prerequisites and permission from the academic unit. Some departments that cannot 
accommodate non-degree students may restrict enrollments to majors only or require 
permits. These students are normally adults taking classes for enrichment purposes, 
public school teachers taking classes for certification renewal, or students taking classes 
as prerequisites for admission to degree programs. Since these students have not made 
a commitment to a degree program, are not subject to time limits, and may enroll on an 
irregular basis, the University policies concerning active/inactive status are more liberal 
than those for degree students. 

A non-degree graduate student may accumulate unlimited graduate credit hours, but if 
the student is later admitted to a degree program, the faculty of that program will decide 
whether or not any credit earned as a non-degree student may be applied to the degree. 
Under no circumstances may a non-degree student apply more than 12 hours of 
previously earned credit toward a degree. 

Advising of Non-degree Students 

Each dean establishes a mechanism to advise non-degree graduate students who 
intend to take the majority of their course work in the dean's school or college. The 
mechanism may be the designation of a faculty member to advise non-degree students 
or the assignment of non-degree students to an advising office or center. Non-degree 
students who express an interest in programs in two colleges may be assigned to either 
by the Office of Admissions and Records. It is expected that the assigned advisor will 
consult the other unit for information when it is needed to assist the student. Students 
who are truly undecided on a major or who plan to take courses in several schools or 
colleges for enrichment may be assigned to the Office of Graduate Education. The num- 
ber of students assigned in this manner will be quite small, and a program advisor will be 
assigned when a student designates a specific interest. 



22 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Previous Graduate Study 

The same three admission classifications (regular, provisional, non-degree) apply to 
those applicants who have undertaken previous graduate study. In general, the cumula- 
tive grade-point average regulations apply to any transfer student who has not com- 
pleted a graduate degree. However, an applicant who has received a master's degree 
from an accredited college or university may be admitted to whatever category is deemed 
most appropriate by the faculty of the program of interest. The calculation of this student's 
grade-point average may be based solely on the grades achieved during study for the 
previous master's degree. 

Reclassification of Provisional Students 

The provisions of a student's provisional status are specified by the graduate depart- 
ment or program. To be reclassified as a regular student, a student must meet the provi- 
sions stated by the department and achieve a minimum grade-point average of 2.75 on 
all course work taken during the provisional period. Individual degree programs may set 
higher grade-point average requirements. 

No later than the completion of the 18th credit hour, a unit must review the student's 
record and make a final decision on the student's admission. A student who has met the 
provisions of admission and achieved the required grade-point average will be reclassi- 
fied as a regular student. A student who fails to meet the provisions of admission or who 
fails to achieve the required grade-point average will be suspended, but may be rein- 
stated in order to transfer to another program or to non-degree status. The academic unit 
must notify the student and the Office of Admissions and Records of its decision. 

Upon notification by the appropriate academic unit, the Office of Admissions and Records 
will prohibit the registration of all provisional graduate students who have reached the 
maximum of 18 credit hours. Registration will not be permitted until the student is reclas- 
sified as a regular student, an exception is granted by an academic dean, or the student 
is transferred. A student may be admitted as a provisional graduate student more than 
one time, but not by the same graduate program. 

All credit hours taken since admission as a provisional graduate student or to be ap- 
plied to a degree count in the 18 credit-hour limit, i.e., undergraduate or graduate credit, 
P/F, S/U, graded courses, credit by senior petition, and transfer credit. 

Other Reclassifications 

Regular and provisional students may become non-degree students by choice. This 
includes students who fail to meet admission or academic standards or who withdraw 
voluntarily. To change a student to non-degree status, the advisor must process an Aca- 
demic Status Change form through the school or college dean's office. 

Non-degree students who later wish to become degree students must present all the 
credentials required by the degree program. This requires the processing of an Aca- 
demic Status Change form by the student's advisor through the Office of Admissions and 
Records. For admission to a degree program, a non-degree student must have achieved 
a minimum grade-point average of 2.75 on all course work taken since admission as a 
graduate student. 

Enrollment and Registration 

Credit Limitations 

Credit toward a graduate degree may be obtained only for courses listed in the 
graduate catalog and numbered 200-499. No more than 40 percent of course cred- 
its counted toward meeting requirements of any graduate degree may be at the 
200 level. No residence credit is allowed for special field assignments or other work 

Enrollment and Registration 23 



taken off the WVU campus without prior approval. Graduate credit is obtained only for 
courses in which the grade earned is A, B, C, or S. No course in which the grade earned 
is D, P, F, or U can be counted toward a graduate degree, nor can courses taken under 
the audit option. 

Credit Overloads 

Graduate students are strongly recommended to limit their credit loads if they are also 
involved in extensive outside work or service activities. In general, persons in full-time 
service to the University or other employer are advised to enroll for no more than six 
hours of work in any one term; those in halftime service are advised to enroll for no more 
than 12 hours. Recommended credit loads may be less for employed graduate students 
in some academic colleges, schools, and departments. 

It is recommended that a student enroll for no more than 1 5 hours of graduate courses 
in any one term and no more than 12 hours in the total of the two summer enrollment 
periods. Credit overloads may be approved for students by their advisors. Some school 
or college dean's offices may also choose to monitor overloads in their academic units. 

Degree Progress 

Students seeking master's or doctoral degrees (as determined by the student's 
application and letter of admission) are expected to enroll regularly and make steady 
progress toward their degree objectives. Master's degree students are permitted 
to continue in a program for a maximum of eight years under their original applica- 
tion. Students who have been inactive for two or more years must reapply and be read- 
mitted. The application fee is assessed. 

Current Information 

The University must have current information (name, address, telephone number, ma- 
jor, and advisor) about students enrolling for classes in order to communicate with stu- 
dents and maintain permanent records. In addition, when individuals do not enroll in 
classes for substantial periods of time, it is costly and time consuming to continue to 
maintain their records on active status. For these reasons, the Office of Admissions and 
Records periodically deletes degree and non-degree student records from active status. 
Students who return after this deletion must reactivate their records by reapplying. 

Advising 

Each academic unit through which graduate degree programs are administered has 
one or more graduate advisors, and every graduate student is assigned an advisor at the 
time of admission or shortly thereafter. The advisor and student should meet before the 
first enrollment to begin formulation of a plan of study. 

Plan of Study 

Shortly after entrance into a degree program and usually before nine to twelve 
hours of graduate course work have been completed, a meeting is held among 
student, advisor, and committee (if appointed) to draw up a plan of study. Depend- 
ing on the degree sought and the field of study, the plan may also contain an outline of 
the research problem to be undertaken. Some graduate programs have the student and 
committee meet at a later date to delineate the research project more formally as a 
prospectus for the report, thesis, or dissertation. The plan of study is subject to mutual 
approval and is made a part of the student's record. It then becomes a formal agree- 
ment between student and program faculty as to the conditions which must be met for 
completion of the degree requirements. Any subsequent changes in the plan of study 
(or prospectus) can be made only through mutual agreement. When the binding 

24 WVU Graduate Catalog 



nature of these documents is fully understood, there is less likelihood that later misun- 
derstanding will arise. Thus, anyone who contemplates application for graduate work at 
WVU is urged to read the graduate catalog carefully and request clarification where 
needed. A student must be very aware of the right to express personal views in the 
drafting of the plan of study and/or research prospectus. Should disagreement arise at 
any time, the responsibility for arbitration rests with the dean of the school or college. 

Records 

Deans' offices maintain all records for monitoring student progress and for certifying 
students for graduation. Among these records are plans of study (subject to the school/ 
college dean's approval); graduate committees (subject to the school/college dean's ap- 
proval); grades; grade modifications, etc. 

Required Minimum Enrollment 

If a graduate student is using University libraries, research facilities, or consulting with 
graduate committee members, it is necessary for the student to enroll for at least one 
hour of graduate credit. In no other way can the University receive credit for its contribu- 
tion to graduate study, attest to student status, and guarantee the protection to which the 
student is entitled. Students who take courses intermittently may be excused from such 
continuous enrollment if they are not using University facilities or consulting with faculty 
while they are not enrolled. However, students formally admitted to candidacy for 
graduate degrees are required to register for at least one credit hour each semes- 
ter as a condition of their continued candidacy. By pursuing a degree at this institu- 
tion, such persons by definition are utilizing University services, facilities, and other re- 
sources, including faculty expertise; this situation continues in cases where students 
have completed all required course work and are working on a thesis or dissertation. 
Candidates for graduate degrees who fail to maintain continuity of enrollment can be 
dropped from candidacy. 

Extended Learning/Off-Campus Study 

West Virginia operates six regional centers located at Charleston, Clarksburg, Park- 
ersburg, Keyser, Shepherdstown, and Wheeling. Approximately 250 graduate courses 
are offered each term at these centers. Students wishing to take off-campus courses 
for graduate credit must first be admitted as graduate students using the same 
procedures as for on-campus study. It is the student's responsibility to obtain from the 
appropriate college, school, and department the specific requirements for degree candi- 
dacy. A new graduate professional development category is available for professionals 
who are seeking graduate credits but do not plan on pursuing a degree. It is also avail- 
able for senior citizens taking a course for personal growth or community members inter- 
ested in a specific topic. Selected courses and degree programs are offered at the 
centers, including special education, communication studies, safety and environmental 
management, computer science, business administration, community health promotion, 
counseling, public health, and social work. Courses in these and other fields meet public 
education certification requirements as well as personal and professional development 
goals. A master of science in nursing is available at selected sites. A doctorate with 
emphasis in education administration is available in cooperation with Marshall 
University. Special courses may be offered at other locations in the state to meet specific 
needs. 

Graduate courses offered are approved by the appropriate department chairpersons, 
academic deans, director of ELO, and by the associate provost for curriculum and 
instruction. Advising and scholarship standards, applicable to both on- and off-campus 
courses, are governed by the individual academic unit. 

Extended Learning 25 



Information about off-campus courses is available from the program unit offering the 
courses, the regional centers, and the Extended Learning Office (ELO), West Everly 
Street, P.O. Box 6800 Morgantown, WV 26506-6800. 

Enrollment During Final Term 

All graduate students must enroll for at least one credit hour during the term (or sum- 
mer) of graduation. Graduate students who are on campus will be required to register by 
the normal registration deadlines. Graduate students who have left the campus will be 
allowed to register until the tenth week of classes in fall and spring terms and the third 
week of Summer-ll. [Note: Quota generally waivers are not to be used to meet this en- 
rollment requirement.] 

Full/Part Time 

A student is classified as full-time or part-time for any given enrollment period. A gradu- 
ate student is classified as full-time if enrolled for nine or more hours in the fall or 
spring terms or six or more hours altogether in the summer. Courses taken on an 
audit basis are not generally recognized as contributing to full-time status determina- 
tion. 

Auditors 

Students may enroll in courses without working for a grade or for credit by registering 
as auditors. Change in status from audit to credit or from credit to audit may be made 
during the registration period. Attendance requirements for auditors are determined by 
the instructor of the course being audited. It is the prerogative of the instructor to strike 
the name of any auditor from grade report forms and to instruct the Office of Admissions 
and Records to withdraw the auditor from the class, if attendance requirements are not 
met. Auditors are required to follow the same admission procedures as students taking 
the course for credit. Courses taken under the audit option are not counted toward a 
graduate degree or toward attaining full-time enrollment status. 

Academic Rights 

Students' academic rights and responsibilities are governed by Board of Trustees' 
policies and corresponding policies, rules, and regulations developed by each of the 
institutions in the University of West Virginia system of education. The rights and respon- 
sibilities of students at West Virginia University are published each year in the WVU 
Student Handbook. Copies of the WVU Student Handbook may be obtained from the 
Office of Student Life in Elizabeth Moore Hall. 

Scholarship 

Because of their familiarity to most students, letter grades are assigned in many graduate 
courses. However, better than "average" performance is expected of graduate stu- 
dents. They are enrolled for fewer credit hours than they were as undergraduates, 9 to 
12 hours being the norm for a full-time graduate student, and are expected to spend 
more time on each course and achieve above average mastery of the material. A few 
grades of C may be tolerated in graduate programs if there are higher grades in other 
courses to compensate for them. Although a grade of C is considered average per- 
formance for an undergraduate student, it is not acceptable as the norm for work 
produced by one who is studying for an advanced degree. 



26 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Grading Scale 

A — excellent (given only to students of superior ability and attainment) 

B — good (given only to students who are well above average, but not in the 
highest group) 

C — fair (average for undergraduate students, but substandard for graduate 
students) 

D — poor but passing (cannot be counted for graduate degree credit) 

F — failure 

I — incomplete 

W — withdrawal from a course before the date specified in the University Calen- 
dar. Students may not withdraw from a course after the specified date un- 
less they withdraw from the University 

WU — withdrawal from the University doing unsatisfactory work 

P — pass (cannot be counted for graduate degree credit— see below) 

X — auditor (no grade and no credit) 

S — satisfactory 

U — unsatisfactory (equivalent to D or F) 

Pass/Fail 
Pass/fail grading is not applicable to the course work for a graduate degree. A 

graduate student may register for any course (1-49S) on a pass/fail basis only if the 
course involved is not included in the student's plan of study and does not count toward 
a graduate degree. The selection of a course for pass/fail grading must be made at 
registration and may not be changed after the close of the registration period. A student 
who, having taken a course on a pass/fail basis, later decides to include the course as part 
of a degree program must reregister for the course on a graded (A, B, C, D, or F) basis. 

S/U 

Courses graded S/U are approved by the associate provost for curriculum and instruc- 
tion. Approved requests are forwarded to the Office of the Faculty Secretary and the 
Office of Admissions and Records for entry into the WVU Master Course Directory. 

GPA 

The grade-point average is computed on all work for which the student has registered 
while a graduate student, except for courses with grades of I, S, W, WU, P, and X, and is 
based on the following grade-point values: A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1 , F = 0, and U = 0. 
Faculty have the option of adding +/- scales to the letter grades but the +/- scales 
are not used in figuring the grade point average. 

Plus/Minus 

Beginning with courses taken in the fall semester of 1 983, pluses and minuses can be 
assigned to grades of A, B, C and D. Pulses and minuses will be recorded on the student's 
academic record but do not affect quality point (GPA) values. 

Incompletes 

When a student receives a grade of I and later removes the incomplete grade, the 
grade-point average is recalculated on the basis of the new grade. The grade of I is given 
when the instructor believes that the course work is unavoidably incomplete or that a 
supplementary examination is justifiable. Before any graduate degree can be awarded, 
the grade of I must be removed either by removal of the incomplete sometime before 



Scholarship 27 



program completion or by having it recorded as a permanent incomplete. Only the in- 
structor who recorded the I, or, if the instructor is no longer at WVU, the chairperson of 
the unit in which the course was given, may initiate either of these actions. In the case of 
withdrawal from the University, a student with a grade of I should discuss that grade with 
the appropriate instructor. An I grade eventually converts to F. Grade changes other than 
I to a letter grade must be accompanied by an explanatory memo. 

Grades Lower Than C 

Credit hours for courses in which the grade is lower than C will not be counted toward 
satisfying graduate degree requirements. These standards are the minimum standards 
for the University. A graduate program may set higher standards which the student must 
meet, but these must be presented in writing to all students upon admission or published 
in the catalog. 

Graduate Credit Via Senior Petition 

Undergraduate students wishing to obtain graduate credit by senior petition must ob- 
tain the standardized permission form from the Office of Admissions and Records. This 
form requires the signature of the student's undergraduate advisor and the dean of the 
college granting the undergraduate degree and the dean of the college of the intended 
graduate degree (if different). The policies regulating an undergraduate's enrollment in 
the graduate-level course for graduate credit are: 

• Enrollment is only permitted in courses numbered 200-399. 

• Undergraduates must be within 12 credit hours of their baccalaureate degrees and 
have a grade-point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

• The maximum amount of graduate credit permitted by senior petition is 12 credit 
hours. 

• The senior petition must be approved prior to or at the time of enrollment. 

• No more than 20% of the total enrollment in any 300-level course may consist of 
undergraduate students. 

Approved senior petitions are returned to the Office of Admissions and Records so 
that a notation of graduate credit may be placed on the student's transcript. Any excep- 
tions to the regulations must be approved by the dean of the school or college in which 
the student seeks graduate credit. Note: Students receiving graduate credit for a 
course do not receive credit toward their undergraduate degree with the same 
course. 

Transcripts 

Each copy of a transcript costs $5.00. Two to three weeks may be required to process 
an application for a transcript at the close of a term or summer term. At other times the 
service requires approximately two to three days from receipt of the request. A transcript 
request must have the date of last attendance at WVU, student identification number and 
all names under which you attended. All requests for transcripts must be sent, in writing, 
directly to the Office of Admissions and Records; no phone requests are accepted. 

Forfeited Transcripts 

Students who default in the payment of any University financial obligation forfeit their 
right to claim a transcript until such time that the obligation has been satisfied. 



28 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Withdrawals 

There are two types of withdrawals: withdrawal from some part of the work for which a 
student has registered, and a complete withdrawal from the University. Unless the for- 
mal withdrawal procedures are completed, failing grades are recorded. Withdraw- 
als from some part of the work must have the initial approval of the student's advisor. It is 
the student's responsibility to see that all forms are properly executed and delivered to 
the appropriate authorities for recording. 

Withdrawals From Classes 

Until the Friday of the tenth week of class (or Friday of the fourth week in a six-week 
summer term, or Friday of the second week of a three-week summer term), students 
may withdraw from individual courses. Deadlines are published in the WVU Schedule of 
Courses each semester. 

Students must obtain their advisor's approval before withdrawing from classes. Stu- 
dents, with the help of their academic advisors, are responsible for determining: 

• If their course load would be reduced below the minimum requirement set by their 
program; 

• If their course load would be reduced below the minimum hours required to qualify 
for a graduate assistantship or financial aid or international full-time student status; 

• If the course to be dropped is a corequisite to another course the student is taking or 
a prerequisite to a course required the following semester. If so, the student may be 
required to drop the corequisite course or asked to take a substitute course the 
following semester. 

Students who withdraw from courses before the published deadline and who follow all 
of the established University procedures receive a W on their transcript for the appropri- 
ate course(s). The grade-point average is not affected in any way by this mark. 

Withdrawals From the University 

Students who decide to leave WVU should withdraw from all classes and must do so 
in accordance with established University policy in order that the official transcript may 
reflect this action. Students are responsible for all financial obligations and for fol- 
lowing established procedures, including the completion of forms and delivery of 
the completed forms to appropriate officials. Students not fulfilling these require- 
ments may have difficulty withdrawing from the University. The withdrawal becomes offi- 
cial only after the forms have been recorded by the Office of Student Life. Students 
receive copies and are urged to keep them. 

Any student (full- or part-time) may withdraw from all classes for which he/she is regis- 
tered in the University any time before the last day on which regular classes are sched- 
uled to meet as established by the University calendar and published in the Schedule of 
Courses. 

Students who desire to withdraw from all remaining classes should report in person to 
the Office of Student Life at the main lobby information desk of Elizabeth Moore Hall. With- 
drawal procedures will be explained at that time. Mountaineer Identification cards must be 
presented. Students unable to withdraw in person because of illness, accident, or other 
valid reasons still must notify the Office of Student Life of their intention to do so. The 
notification should be in writing and student Mountaineer cards must be enclosed. Students 
are responsible, with the help of their academic advisors, for determining how withdrawal 
from the University may affect their future status at the University including such aspects as 
suspension for failure to make progress toward a degree, violation of established academic 
probation, and continued eligibility for scholarship, fellowship, or financial aid. 



Withdrawals 29 



Absences 

Students and faculty have together formulated the University's policy on absences 
from classes. The responsibilities of student and instructor are as follows: 

The student who is absent from class for any reason is responsible for work 
missed. Students should understand that absences may jeopardize their grades or con- 
tinuance in the course. Instructors who use absence records in the determination of 
grades must announce this fact to students (in writing) within the first five class 
meetings. It is the responsibility of the instructor to keep an accurate record of all stu- 
dents enrolled. Instructors may report excessive absences to the student's dean or advi- 
sor. Students who have been absent because of illness, authorized University activities, 
or for other valid reasons are to have the opportunity to make up regularly scheduled 
examinations. As a matter of good manners, a student should inform an instructor in 
advance if obliged to be absent from a class meeting. 

Degree Completion 

Time Limit for Master's Degrees 

Graduate work planned with the student's advisory committee must be satisfac- 
torily completed within a period of eight years immediately preceding the confer- 
ring of the degree. A course taken more than eight years previously must be revalidated 
if it is to be used towards meeting degree requirements. Revalidation can be accom- 
plished by submitting the following information for approval to the office of graduate edu- 
cation: 

• A letter from the course instructor listing the criteria used to revalidate the course 
material. 

• A copy of the student's performance on the student's revalidation examination. 

• A letter from the college/school graduate coordinator and/or dean supporting the 
revalidation. 

Course Work Requirements for Master's Degrees 

Graduate Council policy requires students in a master's program must complete a 
minimum of 24 hours of course work other than thesis credit. A minimum of 30 total hours 
is also considered standard. 

Research Guidelines 

Any graduate student who conducts research involving experiments that utilize 
animals must have a protocol approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee 
before starting the research. Information about procedures and protocol forms may be 
obtained from the Office of Sponsored Programs. 

Any graduate student who conducts research involving the use of human subjects 
must have the approval of the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human 
Subjects before starting the research. Information about procedures and approval forms 
may be obtained from the Office of Sponsored Programs; 886 Chestnut Ridge Road, 
Morgantown, WV 26505-6845. 

Request for Degree 

At the time of registration for the enrollment period in which all degree requirements 
are expected to be met, or at the latest within two weeks after such registration, each 
candidate is to submit a formal request for the conferring of the degree. This is done on 
an Application for Graduation and Diploma form obtainable from the school or college 
dean's office. The candidate must complete all requirements at least one week before 
the end of that enrollment period. If the degree is not actually earned during that term, 

30 WVU Graduate Catalog 



the student must submit a new Application for Graduation and Diploma when registering 
for the term in which completion is again anticipated. 

Colleges and schools are responsible for seeing that master's and doctoral students 
meet the minimum requirements of the University as well as any additional college or 
school requirements. Deans' offices are responsible for maintaining all student records 
necessary to certify students for graduation. Attendance at the spring commencement is 
voluntary. Anyone not planning to attend should leave a complete mailing address with 
the Office of Admissions and Records so that the diploma can be mailed. 

Graduate Committees 

The general requirements for all graduate committees are listed in this paragraph, 
while the specific requirements are found in the succeeding paragraphs. The majority 
members of any graduate committee must be graduate faculty members. The chair of 
the committee must be a member of the graduate faculty. No more than one person may 
be a nonmember of the graduate faculty. No family member can serve on the graduate 
committee of his/her relative. All graduate committees are subject to the approval of the 
chairperson or designee of the department/division and the dean or designee of the 
college/school. Once a graduate committee has been officially established for a student, 
it will not be necessary to alter it because of the downgrading of the graduate faculty status 
of member(s) of the committee. 

Master's committees consist of no fewer than three members. It is recommended 
that at least one member of the committee be from outside the student's department. 
Master's committees of students with the thesis option must be chaired by a regular 
faculty member and the majority of the committee must be regular graduate faculty. 

Doctoral dissertation committees consist of no fewer than five members, the major- 
ity of whom must be regular graduate faculty, including the chairperson. At least one 
member of the committee must be from a department other than the one in which the 
student is seeking a degree. 

Theses and Dissertations 

Theses and dissertations should be presented to the student's graduate advisor or 
committee chairperson at least one month before the end of the enrollment period in 
which completion of all requirements is expected. The form prescribed in the Regula- 
tions Governing the Preparation of Dissertations and Theses must be followed with the 
guidance of the student's graduate advisor or the chairperson of the committee. For the 
manuscript to be approved, there must be no more than one unfavorable vote among 
members of the student's committee. 

Two copies with original signatures in approved typewritten or computer generated 
form (master's theses in bound form and doctoral dissertations unbound) must be deliv- 
ered to the Charles C. Wise, Jr. Library at least one week before the close of the period 
in which the degree is expected to be completed (one week before the end of the second 
summer session, by the last day of the final examination period at the end of the first 
semester, or one week before Commencement Day at the end of the second semester). 

Doctoral Degree - Specific Requirements 

The program of doctoral study is planned with the student's graduate advisor and 
committee to combine any or all of the following: graduate courses of instruction, special 
seminars, independent study, supervised research, and supervised training designed to 
promote a broad and systematic knowledge of the major field and to prepare the student 
for the comprehensive qualifying and final examinations and writing of the dissertation. 



Degree Completion 31 



The doctorate is a research or performance degree and does not depend on the 
accumulation of credit hours. The three requirements of the degree are admission 
to candidacy, residency, and completion and defense of a dissertation. The degree 
signifies that the holder has the competence to function independently at the high- 
est level of endeavor in the chosen profession. Hence, the number of years involved 
in attaining or retaining competency cannot be readily specified. Rather, it is important 
that the doctoral student's competency be assessed and verified in a reasonable period 
of time prior to conferral of the degree, generally five years. 

Graduate education, especially at the doctoral level, involves many learning experi- 
ences which take place outside the formal classroom setting. These involve observing 
and participating in activities conducted by the graduate faculty, using departmental and 
University libraries, attending lectures presented by visiting scholars, informal debates 
with fellow students, and similar activities. To insure that graduate students experience 
these kinds of informal learning, doctoral programs at WVU as elsewhere generally 
require one year in residence in full-time graduate study. However, because of the 
contractual nature of graduate study, an individual student or graduate committee may 
propose an alternative plan by which the student can gain equivalent educational expe- 
rience. For example, the plan of study may require the student to spend time in resi- 
dence at a national or foreign laboratory, institute, archive, or research center as partial 
fulfillment of the residency requirement. 

Regulations governing admission, registration, scholarship, etc., described in the pre- 
ceding sections must be followed. In addition, the student must satisfy requirements 
specified by the faculty responsible for the major field. Students applying for admis- 
sion to a doctoral program, after having received a master's degree at WVU, must 
file a new application for graduate work with the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Competence in one or more foreign languages is a common requirement in graduate 
degree programs. The faculty in the graduate degree program specify the language or 
languages and the level of competence to be demonstrated. Language examinations 
are arranged by the foreign language examiner, who can be contacted through the De- 
partment of Foreign Languages, and under whose direction language examinations are 
administered. 

When only reading competence is required, the foreign language examiner may waive 
the examination in those cases where the student's transcript shows, at a date that proves 
to fall no earlier than seven years before promotion to doctoral candidacy, either comple- 
tion of 12 semester hours or equivalent course work in an approved foreign language, 
with a grade of B or better in the last three hours; or at WVU, completion of French 306, 
German 306, or Russian 306 with a grade of B or better must be achieved. 

Admission to graduate study and enrollment in graduate courses does not of 
itself imply acceptance of the student as a candidate for a doctoral degree. This is 
only accomplished by satisfactorily passing a comprehensive or qualifying ex- 
amination (either oral, or written, or both) and by meeting specified language and/or 
other requirements. 

Candidacy 

A student will be given a comprehensive examination to demonstrate knowledge of 
the important phases and problems of the field of major study, their relation to other 
fields, and the ability to employ the instruments of research. The examination is intended 
to determine whether the student has the academic competence to undertake indepen- 
dent research in the discipline, and to insure that the student possesses a thorough 
grasp of the fields outlined in the plan of study. The examination, which consists of a 
series of tests covering all areas specified in the plan of study, is administered after most 
formal studies have been completed. Scheduling and results of the examination must be 

32 WVU Graduate Catalog 



reported to the school or college dean. It must be the consensus of the doctoral commit- 
tee that the student has passed the examination, although the committee may permit 
one dissenting vote. A single portion of the examination may be repeated at the discre- 
tion of the committee, but if two or more members are dissatisfied, the entire qualifying 
examination must be repeated. The student must petition through the doctoral commit- 
tee in order to be permitted to repeat a qualifying examination, and it is anticipated that a 
waiting period will be specified by the committee during which the student will have an 
opportunity to correct deficiencies. Academic tradition does not allow a qualifying exami- 
nation to be administered more than three times. 

Time Limit 

Because the qualifying examination attests to the academic competence of the stu- 
dent who is about to become an independent researcher or practitioner, the examination 
cannot precede the conferring of the degree by too long a period of time. Consequently, 
doctoral candidates are allowed no more than five years in which to complete 
remaining degree requirements. In the event a student fails to complete the doctorate 
within five years after admission to candidacy, an extension of time can be obtained only 
by repeating the qualifying examination and meeting any other requirements specified 
by the student's committee. 

Dissertation Research 

The candidate must submit a dissertation pursued under the direction of the faculty of 
the University on some topic in the field of the major subject. The dissertation must 
present the results of the candidate's individual investigation and must embody a definite 
contribution to knowledge. While conducting research or writing a dissertation, the stu- 
dent must register at the beginning of each term or summer during which credit is being 
earned. No residence credit will be allowed for special field assignments or other work 
taken off the University campus without prior approval by the associate provost for cur- 
riculum and instruction. 

Final Examination 

The final examination is not given until the term or summer term in which all other 
requirements for the degree are to be met. After the candidate's dissertation has been 
tentatively approved, the final oral examination on the dissertation can be scheduled. At 
the option of the faculty responsible for the degree program, a comprehensive final writ- 
ten examination also may be required. The student's committee chairperson must indi- 
cate in advance the time, place, and recommended examining committee members, and 
receive clearance from the office of the school or college dean before the examination 
can be given. Such notifications of doctoral examinations must be received at least three 
weeks before the examination date. All doctoral final oral examinations are open exami- 
nations and the lead time is required for public notice to the University community. 

The student cannot be considered as having satisfactorily passed the final examina- 
tion if there is more than one unfavorable vote among members of the examining com- 
mittee. Results of each examination must be reported to the school or college dean 
within 24 hours. Reexamination may not be scheduled without approval of the request by 
the school or college dean. All committee members are to be present for the final 
examination. If an examination cannot be scheduled at a time convenient to all commit- 
tee members, the dean or his/her designee may permit another faculty member to sub- 
stitute for the original committee member, provided that the original committee member 
was not the chair. There can be no substitute for the chair. Only one substitute is 
allowed, and the request for a substitute must be made in writing prior to the ex- 
amination. The request for a substitute should be signed by the committee chair, the 

Degree Completion 33 



student, and both the original faculty member and the substitute faculty member. A sub- 
stitute faculty member must have the same or higher graduate faculty status as the 
original faculty member and represent the same academic discipline or specialization. 

Dissertation Submission 

The requirements for a doctorate include acceptance of the dissertation. The disserta- 
tion must bear the original signatures of at least all but one of the committee members. If 
more than one member of the committee, whatever the size of the committee, dissents 
from approving the dissertation, the degree cannot be recommended. If a substitute 
faculty member attends the final examination, the substitute signs the shuttle sheet; how- 
ever, the original committee member is to sign the dissertation. The dissertation must be 
presented to the University not later than one week before the end of the semester or 
summer session in which the degree is expected to be granted (one week before the end 
of the summer, by the last day of the final examination period at the end of the first 
semester, or one week before commencement day at the end of the second semester). 

All doctoral dissertations and their abstracts will be microfilmed through University 
Microfilms, Ann Arbor, Michigan. This requirement will not be satisfied by any other pub- 
lication but does not preclude publication elsewhere, which is both permitted and 
encouraged. Candidates are to follow Regulations Governing the Preparation of Disser- 
tations and Theses regarding format and organization of the dissertation, which is on file 
at the department offices, offices of all graduate advisors, and the University libraries. 
The candidate is required to maintain close contact with the supervisor or chairperson of 
the graduate committee on these matters in developing a dissertation so as to incorpo- 
rate the special requirements of the subject discipline. 

One week before the close of the semester or summer session in which the degree is 
expected to be conferred the candidate must meet these requirements: 

1. Submit in a form satisfactory for microfilming, an appropriately printed, unbound 
original and one copy of the dissertation. Two excellent machine-reproduced cop- 
ies may be acceptable. Both copies must have original signatures of the candidate's 
committee. 

2. Submit one extra abstract of no more than 350 words. This separate abstract must 
have at the top of the first page the centered exact title of the dissertation, followed 
on the next line by the full name of the candidate, and on the next line by the word 
ABSTRACT. The extra abstract is on unnumbered pages. 

3. Submit a microfilm contract completed and signed by the candidate. 

4. Pay a fee of $50.00 to cover the cost of microfilming the dissertation and publica- 
tion of the abstract in Dissertation Abstracts, a bi-monthly journal which receives 
wide distribution. This fee is payable by certified check or money order made out to 
"West Virginia University." If desired, copyright service can be provided through 
WVU upon receipt, along with the dissertation, of a certified check or money order 
for $35.00 made payable to University Microfilms. 

5. Complete the questionnaire entitled Survey of Earned Doctorates. 

Summary of Doctoral Requirements 

1 . Shortly after admission to the program (usually within the first 9-1 2 semester hours 
of course work), an advisory committee is formed and the committee and the stu- 
dent produce a plan of study. 

2. Student completes requisite course work and other program requirements, satis- 
fying also the stipulated residency requirement. 

3. Student takes the language examination (if applicable). 



34 WVU Graduate Catalog 



4. Student takes written and/or oral comprehensive (qualifying) examination for ad- 
mission to candidacy. The results are communicated to the appropriate office by 
the student's graduate program advisor. 

5. Student undertakes a doctoral dissertation under the guidance of a dissertation 
committee. The dissertation phase begins with approval of a dissertation prospec- 
tus by the dissertation committee, the department chairperson, and the school or 
college dean. 

6. A copy of the preliminary draft of the dissertation is given to each committee mem- 
ber at least one month prior to the final oral examination. 

7. The dissertation advisor (committee chairperson) requests a clearance for the 
final examination from the school or college dean's office no later than three 
weeks before the scheduled examination date. 

8. The time and place of the examination is announced. 

9. The student defends the dissertation in an oral defense. 

10. The student delivers two copies of the approved dissertation, appropriate ques- 
tionnaires, and fees to the Charles C. Wise, Jr. Library. 

Summary of Master's Requirements 

1 . Shortly after admission to the program (usually within the first 9-1 2 semester hours 
of course work), an advisory committee is formed and the committee and the 
student produce a plan of study. 

2. The student completes requisite course work and other program requirements. 

3. The student confers with advisor and, if applicable, chairperson of thesis commit- 
tee to see if all requirements can be met by the end of the semester in which he/ 
she plans to graduate. This should be done no later than the beginning of the final 
semester. 

4. The student registers for at least one credit hour; either a course or for the Non- 
En-rolled Graduate Student Evaluation Fee ($50). No one may graduate who is 
not registered as a student during the term of graduation. 

5. The student checks with the University to insure that there is correspondence be- 
tween departmental and University records and that there are no remaining 
deficiencies. 

6. The student completes an Application for Graduation and Diploma. This should 
be done no later than two weeks after registration. 

7. After getting a fee slip from the Office of Admissions and Records, the student 
pays the $30 graduation fee at the cashier's window in the Mountainlair. 

8. {If applicable) The student presents a typed draft of the thesis to each committee 
member. 

9. The student should remind the committee chairperson to request clearance from 
the school or college dean's office at least two weeks before the date of the final 
examination (or thesis defense). 

1 0. Results of the final examination (or thesis defense) must be reported to the dean's 
office by the graduate advisor or the committee chairperson not later than one 
week before the end of the semester or summer session in which the degree is 
expected to be granted. 

11. If the requirements for the master's degree include a thesis, the thesis must bear 
the original signatures of at least all but one of the committee members. If more 
than one member of the committee, whatever the size of the committee, dissents 
from approving the thesis, the degree cannot be recommended. If a substitute 
faculty member attends the final examination, the substitute signs the shuttle sheet; 
however, the original committee member signs the thesis. 



Master's Requirements 35 



12. Two bound and originally signed copies of the thesis (the original and first copy or 
two electrostatically-reproduced copies) must be submitted to the Charles C. Wise. 
Jr. Library no later than one week before the degree is expected to be granted. 

Part 3 Facilities, Fees, and Financial Aid 
Facilities 

The WVU campuses combine traditional and modern architectural styles, and eleven 
campus buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Many of these 
original buildings, including Stalnaker Hall, have recently been restored and renovated. 

A new Campus Master Plan is underway in 1 996. Completion of this monumental task 
will set the stage for numerous changes over the next 10-20 years. New buildings, de- 
partmental moves, and major renovations are expected. This will respond to institutional 
demands for increased efficiency related to facility space management. 

In May 1995, ground breaking ceremonies were held for the WVU Westvaco Natural 
Resources Center. Scheduled for completion in late 1996, the center will provide class- 
room and research facilities in the heart of the 7,800 acre University Forest. 

Major projects to be completed within this plan include an expansion of the Wise 
Library and a campus recreation center. Already completed projects include a parking lot 
near the Evansdale greenhouse, a new rugby field, and lights for the baseball field. 

Parts of the campus are linked by the Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) system, which 
consists of computer-directed, electronic-powered cars that operate on a concrete and 
steel guideway, permitting quick and easy access to major locations within the University 
and the downtown area of Morgantown. 

Greater Morgantown, with a population of 47,000, is located on the east bank of the 
Monongahela River in the rolling hills of northern West Virginia. Morgantown is within 
easy traveling distance of metropolitan areas: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is 75 miles to the 
north, and Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C., are 200 miles to the east. Two 
major highways, Interstates 79 (north/south) and 68 (east/west), pass near Morgantown. 

Of the nearly 23,000 students enrolled on the Morgantown campuses, most under- 
graduates are housed in the University-owned residence halls, and many married stu- 
dents and single graduate students live in University apartments. Approximately 3,000 
students live in privately owned residence halls and fraternity and sorority houses; many 
commute from their parents' homes, and the rest live in apartments, mobile homes, and 
private rooms. 

The Housing and Residence Life Office, located at 1056 Van Voorhis Road, phone 
(304) 293-5840 provides information about University-owned apartments for graduate 
students, faculty and staff. The Student Life Office, in Elizabeth Moore Hall, provides 
information regarding privately-owned, off-campus housing phone (304) 293-5611. List- 
ings for rentals change daily so students should visit the Office of Student Life to check 
availability and make their own arrangements with landlords. Good, affordable accom- 
modations can be found in University and private housing. Due to the terrain, parking is 
limited on the WVU campuses and in the city. 

Because of WVU's resources, the Morgantown area is a major research center in the 
Appalachian region. Four federal agencies have research facilities in the area: Department 
of Health and Human Services (Appalachian Laboratory for Occupational Safety and Health), 
Forest Service (Forestry Sciences Laboratory), Morgantown Energy Technology Center of 
the Department of Energy, and Soil Conservation Service (West Virginia headquarters). 

The West Virginia University Libraries consisting of the main library and eight branches 
contain over 1 .3 million volumes and two million microforms. Some 20,000 volumes are 
added each year, and 9,000 periodical titles are received. The collections are especially 
strong in the biological sciences, chemistry, economics, Africana, Appalachian resources, 
the Health Sciences, and West Virginia History. The libraries are a federal regional de- 
pository for government information and patent and trademark information. Facilities for 



36 WVU Graduate Catalog 



research in West Virginia and regional history are centered in the West Virginia Collec- 
tion Library, on the second floor of Colson Hall. In addition to an extensive collection of 
books, periodicals, and maps, the West Virginia Collection Library contains over five 
million manuscripts. These, together with court records from many counties, are invalu- 
able sources for the study of all aspects of West Virginia and Appalachian history. The 
rare book room contains an unusually fine collection of first and limited editions, includ- 
ing four Shakespeare folios and first editions of many of the works of Dickens, Scott, and 
Clemens. The Libraries are fully automated with access to more than 70 electronic data 
bases. 

The Evansdale Library houses the collections needed to support the schools and col- 
leges on the Evansdale Campus: Agriculture, Engineering and Mineral Resources, Hu- 
man Resources and Education, Social Work, Physical Education, and Creative Arts. 

Discipline-specific libraries serve particular areas. The Physical Sciences Library con- 
tain 37,000 volumes in the fields of chemistry, geology, geography, physics, and as- 
tronomy is in the Chemistry Research Laboratory. The Health Sciences Center Library 
on the second floor of the Basic Sciences Building contains over 150,000 volumes and 
multimedia materials. The Law Library, with a collection of over 130,000 volumes, is in 
the Law Center on the Evansdale Campus. The Mathematics Library in Armstrong Hall 
contains approximately 16,000 volumes. The Music Library in the Creative Arts Center 
contains some 23,000 items, including microcards, microfilms, sound recordings, books, 
scores, and journals. 

The Audiovisual Library located in Colson Hall contains an extensive collection of films, 
videos, and other multimedia to support the curriculum. 

The Libraries are fully automated, providing access to more than 70 electronic data- 
bases, including CD-Roms, Wilson indexes, Current Contents, NIM, and internet re- 
sources. Access to the online electronic resources is available via faculty offices, all 
computer labs, and remotely, using modems. The Libraries are open 98 hours per week 
and most holidays. 

The Office of Disability Services is located at 21 5 Student Services, phone (304) 293- 
6700. It helps qualified students with disabilities to reach their academic potential. Its 
services and accommodations are in keeping with our commitment to provide both archi- 
tectural and programmatic accessibility. Information provided to Disability Services is 
treated as confidential and is not released without the student's prior consent, to the 
consent permitted by law. 

Disability Services provides information, referral, and counseling services not only for 
students with visible impairments but also for students with less apparent disorders such 
as diabetes, cardiovascular problems, learning disorders, asthma, allergies, or epilepsy. 
Also served are persons with a temporary disability such as a sprained ankle, a broken 
arm, or a hospitalization. The following are some of the services this office provides: 

• Liaison between students and faculty. 

• Individual and group counseling. 

• Vocational/career information and referral. 

• Information for faculty on teaching strategies and alternative testing methods for 
students. 

• Provision of interpreters, tutorial referrals, notetaking strategies, and spe- 
cial equipment. 

• Transportation assistance, if eligible, to and from residence (within city limits) and 
class. 

Prospective students with disabilities should contact WVU Admissions and Records 
(304) 293-21 21 and the graduate program of interest for specific information concerning 
application procedures and admission requirements. All students admitted to WVU are 
expected to meet current admission requirements. 

West Virginia University Computing and Information Resources and West Virginia 
Network (WVNET) provide hardware and software for all colleges and schools in the 



Facilities, Fees, Financial Aid 37 



state. The WVU Computing and Information Resources coordinates these resources 
and provides additional services on the WVU campuses. 

WVNET hardware includes an IBM 9672-R63 with 1 gigabyte of main memory, a 
Digital Equipment (DEC) VAX 6000-630 with 384 megabytes of main memory, a DEC 
Alpha Server 4100 with 1 gigabyte of main memory, and a Thinking Machines 
Supercomputer with 32 megabytes of memory in each of four vectors. Disk access to the 
IBM systems is via an EMC Corporation Mirrored Symetrix Integrated Cache Disk Array. 
IBM tape storage includes an IBM 3494 Automated Tape Library, 32 IBM virtual tape 
server drives, and six IBM 3490E tape drives. Total DEC disk storage is 24 gigabytes. 
Printers include four IBM 6262 units and one IBM 3130 unit. 

Languages include C, C++, COBOL, FORTRAN, PL/1 , BASIC, and Pascal. Software 
includes C, SAS, SPSS, SPIRES, and other forms of special purpose engineering 
software. 

Residency Policy for Admission and Fee Purposes 

The following is quoted from the Policy Regarding Residency Classification of Stu- 
dents for Admission and Fee Purposes, policy bulletin number 34, published by the West 
Virginia Board of Trustees. 

2.1 Students enrolling in a West Virginia public institution of higher education shall be 
assigned a residency status for admission, tuition, and fee purposes by the institutional 
officer designated by the President. In determining residency classification, the issue is 
essentially one of domicile. In general, the domicile of a person is that person's true, 
fixed, permanent home and place of habitation. The decision shall be based upon infor- 
mation furnished by the student and all other relevant information. The designated officer 
is authorized to require such written documents, affidavits, verifications, or other evi- 
dence as is deemed necessary to establish the domicile of a student. The burden of 
establishing domicile for admission, tuition, and fee purposes is upon the student. 

2.2 If there is a question as to domicile, the matter must be brought to the attention of the 
designated officer at least two weeks prior to the deadline for the payment of tuition and 
fees. Any student found to have made a false or misleading statement concerning domi- 
cile shall be subject to institutional disciplinary action and will be charged the nonresident 
fees for each academic term theretofore attended. 

2.3 The previous determination of a student's domiciliary status by one institution is not 
conclusive or binding when subsequently considered by another institution; however, 
assuming no change of facts, the prior judgment should be given strong consideration in 
the interest of consistency. Out-of-state students being assessed resident tuition and 
fees as a result of a reciprocity agreement may not transfer said reciprocity status to 
another public institution in West Virginia. 

3.1 Domicile within the state means adoption of the state as the fixed permanent home 
and involves personal presence within the state with no intent on the part of the applicant 
or, in the case of a dependent student, the applicant's parent(s) to return to another state 
or country. Residing with relatives (other than parent(s)/legal guardian) does not, in and 
of itself, cause the student to attain domicile in this state for admission or fee payment 
purposes. West Virginia domicile may be established upon the completion of at least 
twelve months of continued presence within the state prior to the date of registration, 
provided that such twelve months' presence is not primarily for the purpose of atten- 
dance at any institution of higher education in West Virginia. Establishment of West 
Virginia domicile with less than twelve months' presence prior to the date of registration 
must be supported by evidence of positive and unequivocal action. In determining domi- 
cile, institutional officials should give consideration to such factors as the ownership or 
lease of a permanently occupied home in West Virginia, full-time employment within the 
state, paying West Virginia property tax, filing West Virginia income tax returns, register- 
ing of motor vehicles in West Virginia, possessing a valid West Virginia driver's license, 
and marriage to a person already domiciled in West Virginia. Proof of a number of these 
actions shall be considered only as evidence which may be used in determining whether 
or not a domicile has been established. Factors militating against the establishment of 

38 WVU Graduate Catalog 



West Virginia domicile might include such considerations as the student not being self- 
supporting, being claimed as a dependent on federal or state income tax returns, or the 
parents' health insurance policy if the parents reside out of state, receiving financial 
assistance from state student aid programs in other states, and leaving the state when 
school is not in session. 

4.1 A dependent student is one who is listed as a dependent on the federal or state 
income tax return of his/her parent(s) or legal guardian or who receives major financial 
support from that person. Such a student maintains the same domicile as that of the 
parent(s) or legal guardian. In the event the parents are divorced or legally separated, 
the dependent student takes the domicile of the parent with whom he/she lives or to 
whom he/she has been assigned by court order. However, a dependent student who 
enrolls and is properly classified as an in-state student maintains that classification as 
long as the enrollment is continuous and that student does not attain independence and 
establish domicile in another state. 

4.2 A nonresident student who becomes independent while a student at an institution of 
higher education in West Virginia does not, by reason of such independence alone, at- 
tain domicile in this state for admission or fee payment purposes. 

5.1 A person who has been classified as an out-of-state student and who seeks resident 
status in West Virginia must assume the burden of providing conclusive evidence that 
he/she has established domicile in West Virginia with the intention of making the perma- 
nent home in this state. The intent to remain indefinitely in West Virginia is evidence not 
only by a person's statements, but also by that person's actions. In making a determina- 
tion regarding a request for change in residency status, the designated institutional of- 
ficer shall consider those actions referenced in Section 3 above. The change in classifi- 
cation, if deemed to be warranted, shall be effective for the academic term or semester 
next following the date of the application for reclassification. 

6.1 An individual who is on full-time active military service in another state or foreign 
country or an employee of the federal government shall be classified as an in-state stu- 
dent for the purpose of payment of tuition and fees, provided that the person established 
a domicile in West Virginia prior to entrance into federal service, entered the federal 
service from West Virginia, and has at no time while in federal service claimed or estab- 
lished a domicile in another state. Sworn statements attesting to these conditions may 
be required. The spouse and dependent children of such individuals shall also be classi- 
fied as in-state students for tuition and fee purposes. 

6.2 Persons assigned to full-time active military service in West Virginia and residing in 
the State shall be classified as in-state students for tuition and fee purposes. The spouse 
and dependent children of such individuals shall also be classified as in-state students 
for tuition and fee purposes. 

7.1 An alien who is in the United States on a resident visa or who has filed a petition for 
naturalization in the naturalization court, and who has established a bona fide domicile in 
West Virginia as defined in Section 3 may be eligible for in-state residency classification, 
provided that person is in the State for purposes other than to attempt to qualify for 
residency status as a student. Political refugees admitted into the United States for an 
indefinite period of time and without restriction on the maintenance of a foreign domicile 
may be eligible for an in-state classification as defined in Section 3. Any person holding 
a student or other temporary visa cannot be classified as an in-state student. 
8.1 A person who was formerly domiciled in the state of West Virginia and who would 
have been eligible for an in-state residency classification at the time of his/her departure 
from the state may be immediately eligible for classification as a West Virginia resident 
provided such person returns to West Virginia within a one-year period of time and satis- 
fies the conditions of Section 3 regarding proof of domicile and intent to remain perma- 
nently in West Virginia. 

9.1 Each institution shall establish procedures which provide opportunities for students 
to appeal residency classification decisions with which they disagree. The decision of the 
designated institutional official charged with the determination of residency classification 
may be appealed in accordance with appropriate procedures established by the presi- 
dent of the institution. At a minimum, such procedures shall provide that: 

Residency Policy 39 



9.1 .1 An institutional committee on residency appeals will be established to receive and 
act on appeals of residency decisions made by the designated institutional official charged 
with making residency determinations. 

9.1.1a The institutional committee on residency shall be comprised of members of the 
institutional community, including faculty and student representatives, and whose num- 
ber shall be at least three, in any event, an odd number. The student representative(s) 
shall be appointed by the president of the institutional student government association 
while the faculty representative(s) shall be selected by the campus-wide representative 
faculty organization. 

9.1.1b The student contesting a residency decision shall be given the opportunity to 
appear before the institutional committee on residency appeals. If the appellant cannot 
appear when the committee convenes a meeting, the appellant has the option of allow- 
ing committee members to make a decision on the basis of written materials pertaining 
to the appeal or waiting until the next committee meeting. 

9.1 .2 The residency appeal procedures will include provisions for appeal of the decision 
of the institutional committee on residency appeals to the president of the institution. 

9.1 .3 Residency appeals shall end at the institutional level. 

Fees and Expenses 

All West Virginia University fees are subject to change without notice. A nonrefundable 
special service fee of $45 must accompany the application for admission to graduate 
studies. All fees are due and payable to revenue and loan services on the days of regis- 
tration. Completion of arrangements with revenue and loan services office for payment 
from officially accepted scholarships, loan funds, grants, or contracts shall be consid- 
ered sufficient for acceptance of registration. Fees paid after regular registration must be 
paid to the University cashier. Any student failing to complete registration on regular 
registration days is subject to a late registration fee. 

At registration, students pay the fees shown in the fee charts, plus special fees and 
deposits as required. No degree is conferred upon any candidate and no transcripts are 
issued to any student before payment is made of all tuition, fees, and other indebtedness 
to any unit of the University. 

Regulations 

It is the policy of West Virginia University to place on restriction students who have 
outstanding debts to a unit or units of the University. The restriction may include, but is 
not limited to, the withholding of a student's registration, diploma, or transcript. Persons 
who are neither registered as University students nor members of its administrative or 
teaching staffs shall not be admitted to regular attendance in University classes. 

Off-Campus/Music/Lab Fees 

Tuition for credit hours for off-campus students are the same as those charged stu- 
dents enrolled on-campus. Off-campus students do not pay the Daily Athenaeum fee, 
the radio station fee, or the Mountainlair construction fee. 

Off-campus-only students are not assessed special fees, but they are charged $33.00 
per credit hour for each off-campus course and television course. 

Consult specific departmental sections of this catalog concerning nonrefundable de- 
posits and microscope rentals. 

All music majors must pay a fee of $15.00 per semester, which entitles them to as- 
signed practice space one hour per day. Additional space may be available at the rate of 
$4.00 per hour. Band and orchestra instruments may be rented by the semester for 
$10.00. 

Auditors 

Students may enroll in courses without working for grade or for credit by registering as 
auditors and by paying full fees. 

40 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Waivers 

According to legislation passed by the West Virginia Legislature in 1983, WVU is lim- 
ited in the number of graduate and professional waivers that can be awarded each school 
year. According to Board of Trustees Policy Bulletin No. 49, WVU must give priority con- 
sideration in awarding these waivers to students who are West Virginia residents and 
also to faculty and staff of West Virginia public and private colleges and universities. 

Academic deans, directors, and vice presidents of other University of West Virginia 
Board of Trustees institutions are charged with responsibility of awarding tuition waivers. 
Students should contact the appropriate person in their department, school, or college 
for information regarding applications and priorities. 

Student Refund Policy 

Note: This policy was revised 12/22/94 and is subject to change. 

Students withdrawing from the University or dropping courses such that they no longer 
qualify for full-time status within the refund period are eligible for a tuition and fee 
refund. Every effort is made to process refunds within 30 days. If a graduate assistant- 
ship is canceled before the end of the term, the student may be responsible for paying all 
or part of the tuitition and fees for that term (see below). 

Refund of Fees 

Withdrawals To withdraw officially and receive a refund, a student must apply at the 
Office of Student Life. Term fees are refundable as follows: 

1 . Tuition, special, and refundable miscellaneous fees - Refundable based on date of 
withdrawal and student status.* Refer to refund schedule. 

2. Optional health service fee - Refundable based on date of withdrawal and student 
status.* Refer to refund schedule. 

3. Lab fees - Refundable during the first week of classes only based on student 
status.* Refer to refund schedule. 

4. Nonrefundable miscellaneous fees (includes application, transcript, graduation, late 
registration/payment, and reinstatement fees) - These fees are nonrefundable. 

5. Room and board - The unused portion of room and board is refunded on a pro rata 
basis, based on the date the student's belongings are removed from the room and 
the meal ticket/ID and room keys are surrendered. 

Exceptions: Students called to the armed services of the United States may be granted 
full refund of refundable fees, but no course credit, if the call comes before the end of the 
first three-fourths of the semester. If the call comes thereafter, full credit of course(s) may 
be granted provided the student is maintaining a passing mark at time of departure for 
military services. 

Students withdrawn due to catastrophic illness or death will be provided a refund as 
approved by the dean of student life or his/her designee. 

*Students enrolled for their first semester at West Virginia University (or who received a 100% 
refund for previous semester) and who received Title IV aid are refunded per federal regulations. 
Federal regulations require refunds to be figured using both state (Board of Trustees Series #22) 
and statutory pro rata (Higher Education Amendments of 1992) calculations. After figuring both 
refunds, the calculation that provides the largest refund is given. 

Dropped Courses 

If a student drops below full time status (12 hours for undergraduate and 9 hours for 
graduates), semester fees are refundable as follows: 

1 . Tuition, special, and refundable miscellaneous fees - Refundable based on date of 
dropped course(s). Refer to refund schedule. 

2. Optional health service fee - Fee is nonrefundable. 

3. Lab fees - Refundable at 1 00% during the first week of classes only and nonre 
fundable thereafter. 



Refund Policy 41 



4. Nonrefundable miscellaneous fees (includes application, transcript, graduation, late 
registration/payment, and reinstatement fees) - These fees are nonrefundable. 



Refund Schedule 

Fall/Spring Term (16 week session) 

Refund Period BOT* HEA** Refund Period 

1 st week 90% 90% 9th week 

2nd week 90% 80% 1 0th week 

3rd week 70% 80% 11th week 

4th week 70% 70% 12th week 

5th week 50% 60% 13th week 

6th week 50% 60% 14th week 

7th week 50% 1 5th week 

8th week 50% 16th week 



BOT* 



HEA' 

40% 



Summer Term (6 week session) 
Refund Period BOT* HEA* 



Day 1 thru 4 


90% 


80% 


Day 5 


70% 


80% 


Day 6 thru 8 


70% 


60% 


Day 9 and 10 


50% 


60% 


Day 11 and 12 


50% 


50% 


Day 13 thru 15 




50% 


Day 16 thru 30 






Summer Term (2 week 


session' 


Refund Period 


BOT* 


HEA 


Day 1 and 2 


90% 


50% 


Day 3 


70% 


50% 


Day 4 


50% 


50% 


Day 5 thru 10 







Summer Term (3 week Session) 
Refund Period BOT* HEA * 



Day 1 and 2 


90% 


60% 


Day 3 and 4 


70% 


60% 


Day 5 


50% 


60% 


Day 6 


50% 


60% 


Day 7 thru 15 







Summer Term (1 week session) 
Refund Period BOT * HEA** 

Day 1 90% 

Day 2 70% 

Day 3 

Day 4 and 5 

* Board cf Trustees Series #22: Percent = number of days in term times percent of term allocated for 
refund (refer to BOT Series #22). If the percent calculation identifies a partial day, the entire day is 
included in the higher refund period. 

** Higher Education Amendments of 1992: Percent = number of weeks remaining in the enrollment 
period divided by total number of weeks in the enrollment period (rounded down to nearest 10%). 



Non-Sufficient Funds Check Policy 

A service charge of $15 will be collected on each check returned unpaid by the bank 
upon which it is drawn. If the check returned by the bank was in payment of University 
and registration fees, the controller's office shall declare the fees unpaid and registration 
cancelled if the check has not been redeemed within three days from date of written 
notice. In such a case the student may be reinstated upon redemption of the check, 
payment of the $15 service charge, and the late payment fee of $30. 

Payments of tuition, fees, and other charges by check are subject to WVU's non- 
sufficient funds check policy. A copy of the policy is available in the revenue and loan 
services office. 

Financial Aid 

The Student Financial Aid Office estimates that the total cost of attending WVU for a 
nine-month academic year is $9,300 for single West Virginia residents living on or off- 
campus and $6,700 for those living at home; $1 3,385 for single nonresidents living on or 
off-campus and $10,600 for those living at home. These typical estimated student bud- 
gets include tuition and fees, books and supplies, room, board, transportation, and per- 
sonal expenses that provide for a modest but adequate lifestyle. 



42 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Assistantships 

West Virginia University annually awards about 1,500 graduate assistantships sup- 
ported from state appropriations, federal funds, private grants, and contracts; and about 
200 fellowships and traineeships derived from federal agencies and from industries and 
private foundations. Fellowships are awarded on the basis of academic merit and re- 
quire no service in return. Graduate fellows are expected to spend full time in pursuit of 
their studies, but may teach to the extent that the particular degree program requires. 
Most traineeships, provided through institutional grants, are also for full-time study with- 
out scheduled duties. 

All graduate assistants and fellows are required to be full-time (nine hours or 
more) graduate students. The individual is primarily a student and secondarily an em- 
ployee. Tuition and registration fees generally are remitted (see below). Awards are made 
by degree programs or by the nonacademic unit where service is to be rendered. Appli- 
cations should be made to the dean or director concerned or to the chairperson of the 
program in which the graduate work will be pursued. Early application is strongly recom- 
mended. Students may hold only one appointment as a graduate assistant per term. 

Remission of Fees 

Students appointed as graduate assistants are eligible to apply for remission 
of tuition and certain fees. Tuition and some fees are generally remitted or paid for 
fellows and trainees. All students must pay the Mountainlair construction, radio station, 
and Daily Athenaeum fees, but graduate assistants, fellows, and trainees are granted 
the option with regard to the remainder of the institution activity fee. 

Students may not hold more than the total equivalent of one assistantship. 
This rule applies even if the appointment comes from several sources (e.g., graduate 
teaching assistantship, graduate research assistantship, graduate administrative assis- 
tantship, graduate residence hall assistantship, and/or teaching fellow). 

Terms of Employment 

Stipends for graduate assistantships are generally stated in terms of nine- or twelve- 
month appointments and require service to the institution. The term of service normally 
runs from August 15 to May 15 for nine-month appointments or from August 15 to De- 
cember 31 for the fall semester or January 1 until May 15 for spring semester. The total 
hours of work, as well as the particular days of service (e.g., weekends and/or holidays) 
required, must be made clear to the student by the appropriate graduate department at 
the time of assigning the assistantship. 

Graduate Teaching Assistant 

A person who holds a graduate teaching assistantship is obligated to the extent of 
teaching two three-hour courses per semester, or for the equivalent in laboratory classes, 
or for other forms of departmental assistance, except research assistance, amounting to 
a minimum of 1 2 clock hours per week. These assistantships are generally registered to 
academic units. 

Graduate Research Assistant 

A graduate research assistant is a graduate student whose duties consist of assisting 
in the research of a faculty member with an obligation of not less than 1 5 or more than 20 
clock hours per week in any semester. 

Graduate Administrative Assistant 

A student employed as a graduate administrative assistant works part time in one of 
the administrative offices of WVU. Assistantships obligate the student to no less than 12 
or more than 20 hours of work per week in any semester. 

Financial Aid 43 



Graduate Residence Assistants 
(Department of Housing and Residence Life) 

Resident assistant positions are available for single undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents. There are nine University-supervised residence halls which house approximately 
3.600 first-year and upper-class residents. Resident assistants are required to provide 
educational, cultural, recreational, and social opportunities and programs for their resi- 
dents. Remuneration for resident assistant positions is room, board, and a monthly sti- 
pend. Graduate students may also receive a tuition waiver for a few, specialized, live-in 
positions. 

To obtain further information about the resident assistant recruitment and selection 
process, write to the assistant director for residence life. G-1 06. Bennett Tower. P.O. Box 
6430. West Virginia University, Morgantown. WV 26506-6430. 

Advising Center Assistant 

Assistantships are available through the University Advising Center for students who 
have been admitted to a graduate program. Those who are accepted will provide aca- 
demic advising services to freshman and sophomore students. A stipend is paid and the 
graduate student is eligible to apply for waiver of tuition and registration fees. Contact the 
director of the University Academic Services Center for information and applications. 

Teaching Fellow 

A teaching fellow is an advanced graduate student, usually in a doctoral program, who 
would qualify for a junior faculty position if that person were not a graduate student at WVU. 
A teaching fellow may be given major responsibilities for the design and/or operation of a 
course, whereas such responsibility is not placed on a graduate teaching assistant. 

Policy On Remuneration for Graduate Assistants 

The following principles apply to remuneration for duties performed by graduate 
assistants. 

1 . G r aduate Assistant (other than GRHA) salaries must meet or exceed the Univer- 
sity minimum on a 9-month equated basis as set by the Office of Academic Affairs, 
with the minimum salary for doctoral (post-master's) students set higher than the 
minimum for master's level students. The minimum salary in effect for 1997-98 is 
at the rate of S612 per month which amounts to S2754 for a semester, S5508 for 
9-months. and S7344 for 12-months. The remuneration in effect for 1997-98 for 
GRHA is room, some board, and S150 per month. 

International students must meet financial support criteria (currently about S9120 
for 12 months in addition to tuition and fee charges) from an assistantship and/or 
other sources in order to qualify for a Certificate of Eligibility (I-20 or IAP-66) and. 
subsequently, a student visa. 

2. Academic and other units are required to establish discipline-based salary ranges 
by student level (i.e., masters, doctoral, first-professional) for graduate assistants 
funded in their units. 

Swiger Fellowships 

Arlen G. and Louise Stone Swiger have been special benefactors to WVU in their 
establishment of this fellowship program through the West Virginia University Founda- 
tion, Inc. Both were WVU graduates. Arlen G. Swiger. a successful New York attorney, 
bequeathed to the University half of his estate which became available to the WVU Foun- 
dation upon the death of his widow. Louise Stone Swiger. These fellowships are open 

44 WVU Graduate Catalog 



to doctoral students. Selection is competitive on the basis of academic merit. Applica- 
tion should be made early in the year preceding the year of anticipated enrollment in a 
doctoral program. Inquiries should be directed to the Office of Graduate Education. 

W. E. B. DuBois Fellowships 

Dr. William Edward Burghardt DuBois was born in 1868. He was educated at Fisk 
University and received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1896. Dr. DuBois was one 
of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and 
the Pan-African Congress Movement. Author of many historical and analytical studies 
of American and African society, his example provides a standard of excellence for 
scholarship in any discipline and an especially inspiring model for black scholars. Be- 
cause of the achievements of Dr. DuBois. West Virginia University has named this 
fellowship program in his honor. The fellowships are open to black graduate and pro- 
fessional students who are native or naturalized U.S. citizens. Selection is competitive 
on the basis of academic merit and potential for success in graduate or professional 
study. Inquiries should be directed to the graduate or professional program of choice or 
to the Office of Graduate Education. 

Veterans Educational Assistance 

The educational assistance program administered by the federal Department of Vet- 
eran Affairs, under which a potentially eligible veteran may be entitled to benefits, is 
largely dependent upon when the individual served on active duty. DVA administers 11 
educational assistance programs and the basic eligibility criteria may vary. Generally, 
only DVA can determine an applicant's eligibility for educational assistance. For more 
information, contact the nearest DVA office; in West Virginia, the DVA is located at 640 
4th Avenue, Huntington, WV 25701; telephone: 1-800-827-1000. 

Loans and Employment 

Information and guidance on loans for graduate students are available in the Student 
Financial Aid Office, Mountainlair. On-campus employment opportunities can be investi- 
gated at the Student Financial Aid Office in the Mountainlair and the Human Resources 
Office in Knapp Hall. A summer and part-time job service is operated by the WVU Career 
Services Center in the Mountainlair. Its purpose is to place students in part-time or tem- 
porary jobs in Morgantown and the surrounding area. 

Fellowships within the United States and Abroad 

Students are encouraged to submit applications to outside agencies that support gradu- 
ate-level study and research. Among the opportunities available are programs spon- 
sored by the Fulbright-Hays Training Grants, the National Science Foundation, the Mar- 
shall Scholarship Program, the National Institutes of Health, the Oak Ridge Associated 
Universities, and the Rhodes Scholarships. Students should contact the Office of Spon- 
sored Programs for assistance in applying for these programs. In most cases, this office 
will refer the student to a faculty advisor who can provide detailed assistance. Several 
national agencies publish information about fellowships and financial aid opportunities 
for graduate students. Individuals interested in reviewing this information should consult 
the personnel at the reference desk of the Charles C. Wise, Jr. Library. 

Academic Integrity/Dishonesty 

The academic development of students and the overall integrity of the institution are 
primary responsibilities of WVU. Academic dishonesty is condemned at all levels of life, 
indicating an inability to meet and face issues and creating an atmosphere of mistrust, 
disrespect, and insecurity. In addition, it is essential in an academic community that grades 



Academic Integrity/Dishonesty 45 



accurately reflect the attainment of the individual student. Faculty, students, and admin- 
istrators have shared responsibilities in maintaining the academic integrity essential for 
the University to accomplish its mission. 

Students should act to prevent opportunities for academic dishonesty to occur, and in 
such a manner to discourage any type of academic dishonesty. 

Faculty members are expected to remove opportunities for cheating, whether related 
to test construction, test confidentiality, test administration, or test grading. This same 
professional care should be exercised with regard to oral and written reports, laboratory 
assignments, and grade books. 

Deans and department chairpersons are expected to acquaint all faculty with expected 
professional behavior regarding academic integrity, and to continue to remind them of 
their responsibility. Deans and department chairpersons shall assist faculty members 
and students in handling first-offense cheating allegations at the lowest possible level in 
the University, and with discretion to prevent damage to the reputation of any person 
who has not been found guilty in the prescribed manner. 

Each member of the teaching faculty and all other WVU employees, including but not 
limited to assistants, proctors, office personnel, custodians, and public safety officers, 
shall promptly report each known case of academic dishonesty to the appropriate super- 
visor, department chairperson, or dean of the college or school concerned, and to the 
Office of Judicial Programs, Office of Student Life. 

Definition 

West Virginia University expects that every member of its academic community shares 
the historic and traditional commitment to honesty, integrity, and the search for truth. 
Academic dishonesty is defined to include but is not limited to any of the following: 

1 . Plagiarism: To take and pass off as one's own the ideas, writings, artistic products, 
etc. of someone else; for example, submitting, without appropriate acknowledg 
ment, a report, notebook, speech, outline, theme, thesis, dissertation, or other writ- 
ten, visual, or oral material that has been knowingly obtained or copied in whole or 
in part, from the work of others, whether such source is published, including (but 
not limited to) another individual's academic composition, compilation, or other prod- 
uct, or commercially prepared paper. 

2. Cheating and dishonest practices in connection with examinations, papers, and 
projects, including but not limited to: 

a. Obtaining help from another student during examinations. 

b. Knowingly giving help to another student during examinations, taking an exami- 
nation or doing academic work for another student, or providing one's own work 
for another student to copy and submit as his/her own. 

c. The unauthorized use of notes, books, or other sources of information during 
examinations. 

d. Obtaining without authorization an examination or any part thereof. 

3. Forgery, misrepresentation or fraud: 

a. Forging or altering, or causing to be altered, the record of any grade in a grade 
book or other educational record. 

b. Use of University documents or instruments of identification with intent to 
defraud. 

c. Presenting false data or intentionally misrepresenting one's records for admis- 
sion, registration, or withdrawal from the University or from a University course. 

d. Knowingly presenting false data or intentionally misrepresenting one's records 
for personal gain. 

e. Knowingly and unethically furnishing the results of research projects or 
experiments. 

f. Knowingly furnishing false statements in any University academic proceeding. 
Academic dishonesty includes plagiarism; cheating and dishonest practices in con- 
nection with examinations, papers, and projects; and forgery, misrepresentation, and 



46 WVU Graduate Catalog 



fraud. Some cases of forgery, misrepresentation, or fraud which occur outside the con- 
text of courses or academic requirements may be referred directly to the University Com- 
mittee on Student Rights and Responsibilities by any member of the University commu- 
nity. In such cases, the University Committee on Student Rights and Responsibilities will 
arrange a hearing following the procedure outlined in Step 3 within 15 calendar days of 
receipt of the charges. 

Hearing Procedure Steps 

Step 1. If a student is charged with academic dishonesty, the instructor will contact the 
student in person and/or notify the student in writing of the specifics of the charge within 
15 calendar days of the discovery of the offense. The student must respond within five 
calendar days of the receipt of the notification. If the instructor determines the student is 
guilty, the maximum penalties the instructor may administer are exclusion from the course, 
a lower grade, and/or an unforgivable F (not eligible for D/F repeat policy) in the course. 
The instructor and/or the department chairperson also may recommend to the dean of 
the college in which the course is offered that additional penalties be imposed on the 
student. At the discretion of the faculty member or department chairperson, in cases 
where there is written admission of guilt by the student, the case may be satisfactorily 
resolved at the departmental level. Whenever a penalty is administered, the facts of the 
case shall be reported in writing to the dean of the college or school and a copy for- 
warded to the Office of Judicial Programs for the permanent records. In cases wherein 
academic dishonesty occurs in a college or school other than that in which the student is 
enrolled, the results of the case shall be reported to the dean of the college or school in 
which the student involved is enrolled. 

Step 2. If the student denies guilt, if the student believes the penalty imposed in Step 1 is 
unjust, or if the instructor and/or department chairperson determines the penalties avail- 
able at Step 1 are insufficient for a specific act, the dean of the college or school in which 
the course is offered shall be notified in writing of the specifics of the case. The dean 
shall then implement the following steps within 1 5 calendar days of receipt of notification: 
Step 3. If the student wishes to appeal the decision of the dean, the appeal must reach 
the University Committee on Student Rights and Responsibilities within 30 calendar days 
of the student's receipt of the dean's decision. The University Committee on Student 
Rights and Responsibilities will arrange a hearing within 15 calendar days using the 
following procedures: 

The University Committee on Student Rights and Responsibilities will reach a decision 
within seven days of the hearing. If the University Committee on Student Rights and 
Responsibilities finds the student guilty, it will determine the penalty it deems appropriate 
under the circumstances and inform all parties involved. The penalty imposed cannot be 
more severe than the penalty imposed by the dean. 

Step 4. Only sanctions of suspension or dismissal invoked or upheld by the University 
Committee on Student Rights and Responsibilities may be appealed to the President or 
his/her designee. Such appeals must reach the President's Office within 30 calendar days 
after receipt of written notice of the decision of the University Committee on Student Rights 
and Responsibilities. The decision of the President or the President's designee is final. 

Notes on the fee charts on the following pages: 

f Nine credit hours are considered the usual maximum at WVU. 
*Special fees include Mountainlair ($58), Daily Athenaeum ($7), radio station ($5), health, 
counseling service, and programs ($106), transportation ($51), student affairs ($31), 
and athletic ($46). 

Fees listed are accurate as of January 1 , 1 998; however, fees are subject to change 
without notice. Contact the Office of Admissions and Records for more current 
information. 



Academic Integrity/Dishonesty 47 



Fees per Credit Hour for Graduate Studies 





Resident 




Non-Resident 




Credit 




Special 






Special 




Hours 


Tuition 


Fees* 


Total 


Tuition 


Fees* 


Total 





$107 


$34 


$141 


$391 


$34 


$425 


1 


107 


34 


141 


391 


34 


425 


2 


214 


68 


282 


782 


68 


850 


3 


321 


102 


423 


1,173 


102 


1,275 


4 


428 


136 


564 


1,564 


136 


1,700 


5 


535 


170 


705 


1,955 


170 


2,125 


6 


642 


204 


846 


2,346 


204 


2,550 


7 


749 


238 


987 


2,737 


238 


2,975 


8 


856 


272 


1,128 


3,128 


272 


3,400 


*9 


941 


304 


1,245 


3,499 


304 


3,803 



Higher Education Resource Fund 

This fee is paid by graduate students in the Colleges of Business and Economics and 

Engineering and Mineral Resources. 

Credit hours Resident Non-Resident 

$18 $25 

1 18 25 

2 36 50 

3 54 75 

4 72 100 

5 90 125 

6 108 150 

7 126 175 

8 144 200 
*9 155 225 



Fees per Credit Hour for Health Sciences 

Resident 
Credit Special Health 



Graduate Studies 

Non-Resident 
Special Health 



Hours 


Tuition 


Fees 


Prof. 


Total 


Tuition 


Fees 


Prof. 


Total 





$72 


$34 


$68 


$174 


$219 


$34 


$269 


$522 


1 


72 


34 


68 


174 


219 


34 


269 


522 


2 


144 


68 


136 


348 


438 


68 


538 


1,044 


3 


216 


102 


204 


522 


647 


102 


807 


1,566 


4 


288 


136 


272 


691 


876 


136 


920 


2,088 


5 


360 


170 


340 


870 


1,095 


170 


1,076 


2,610 


6 


432 


204 


408 


1,044 


1,314 


204 


1,380 


3,132 


7 


504 


238 


476 


1,218 


1,533 


238 


1,610 


3,654 


8 


576 


272 


544 


1,392 


1,752 


272 


1,840 


4,176 


9 


635 


304 


612 


1,551 


1,955 


304 


2,063 


4,677 



48 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Master of Public Health Program 

Resident 
Special Health 



Tuition 


Fees Prof. Total 


Tuition 




$72 


$34 $97 $203 


$219 


Additional Fees for Pharmacy 






Resident Non-Resident 




Hours 




Education Fee 









$3.00 $12 




1 




3.00 12 




2 




6.00 24 




3 




9.00 36 




4 




12.00 48 




5 




15.00 60 




6 




18.00 72 




7 




21.00 84 




8 




24.00 96 




9 




25.00 100 




PHARM D 






Resident 




Non-Resident 




$117.00 




$402.00 




117.00 




402.00 




234.00 




804.00 




351.00 




1,206.00 




468.00 




1,608.00 




585.00 




2,010.00 




702.00 




2,412.00 




819.00 




2,814.00 




936.00 




3,216.00 




1,046.00 




3,614.00 





Non-Resident 
Special Health 
Fees Prof. Total 

$34 $326 $579 



Resident Non-Resident 

Health Professions Fee 



$85 
85 
170 
255 
340 
425 
510 
595 
680 
759 



$309 

309 

618 

927 

1,236 

1,545 

1,854 

2,136 

2,472 

2,773 



Fee Charts 



49 



Other Fees 

Application for admission (Dentistry and Medicine) $45 

Application for admission (Law or Graduate Studies) 45 

Diploma replacement 20 

Graduation 30 

(All students pay this fee at the beginning of the term or 
session in which they expect to complete their degrees.) 

Late registration (nonrefundable) 30 

(Charged to students who do not register on the registration days 
set forth in the University Calendar.) 

Professional engineering degree (includes $20.00 graduation fee) 35 

Late penalty fee 20 

Student identification card replacement 20 

Student record fee 5 

Official transcript 5 

Official letter (statement of degree/grade-point average) 5 

Course descriptions 5 

Priority service on above 8 



50 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Part 4 Programs and Courses 

Schedule of Courses 

Before the opening of each term and the summer terms, a Schedule of Courses is 
printed, announcing the courses that will be offered by the colleges and schools of WVU. 

Plan for Numbering Courses 

For convenience, each course of study is designated by the name of the department in 
which it is given and by the number of that course. The plan for numbering courses is as 
follows: 

Courses 1-99: Courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores. 
Courses 100-199: Courses intended primarily for juniors and seniors. 
Courses 200-299: Courses for advanced undergraduate students and selected gradu- 
ate students. No more than 40 per cent of the credits counted for meeting requirements 
for a graduate degree can be at the 200 level. 

Courses 300-399: Courses for graduate students, students in professional programs 
leading to a doctorate, and selected advanced undergraduate students. Undergraduates 
in any class carrying a 300-level course number must have a 3.0 cumulative grade point 
average and written approval on special forms from the course instructor and the student's 
advisor. Seniors within 1 2 semester hours of graduation may, with prior approval of their 
advisors, enroll in 300-level graduate courses for graduate credit. 
Courses 400-499: Courses for graduate students only. 

In summary, 200-level courses are intended primarily to serve undergraduate students; 
300-level courses are intended primarily to serve introductory course needs for gradu- 
ate programs. 

NOTE: Graduate degree credit-hour requirements must include at least 60 per 
cent at the 300 and 400 level. 

Graduate Level Common Course Numbers and Descriptions 

(as approved by the Faculty Senate) 
Course 391 Advanced Topics . Variable 1-6 hr. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced 
topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. 

Course 397 Research. Variable 1-15 hr. PR: Consent. Research activities leading to a 
thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

Any school, college, department, or division may elect to offer these courses for its 
students. With the approval of the assistant vice president for curriculum and instruction, 
these courses may be graded S or U. 

Courses 491 and 497: Courses 491 Advanced Study and 497 Research are approved 
for University-wide use by any academic unit. Courses numbered 491 and 497 may be 
graded S or U. 

Courses 492-495: Courses are approved by the assistant vice president for curriculum 
and instruction. Approved requests are forwarded to the Office of Admissions and Records 
for entry into the WVU Schedule of Courses. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I and II. 1-3 hr. PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching 
of (Subject matter determined by department/division/college/school offering the course.) 

Note: This course is intended to insure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared and 
supervised when they are given college teaching responsibility. It also provides a mechanism for 
students not on assistantships to gain teaching experience. Courses numbered 490 are graded 
S/U. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-6 hr. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced topics which are not 
covered in regularly scheduled courses. Study may be independent or through specially sched- 
uled lectures. 

Note: This course is intended to be helpful in pioneering new courses prior to requesting formal 
approval through the Senate Curriculum Committee and the full Faculty Senate (no later than the 
semester following the second offering of a particular Special Topics course) and to allow distin- 
guished visitors whose stay will be a month or longer to instruct in their own fields of specialty. 



Programs and Courses 51 



492. Directed Study. I, II, S. 1-6 hr. Directed study, reading, and/or research. 

493. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-6 hr. A study of contemporary topics selected from recent develop- 
ments in the field. 

494. Special Seminars. I, II, S. 1-6 hr. Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate 
students. 

495. Independent Study. I, II, S. 1-6 hr. Faculty-supervised study of topics not available through 
regular course offerings. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 hr. PR: Consent. It is anticipated that each graduate student will present 
at least one seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of his/her program. 

Note: This course is intended to provide a mechanism for graduate students to give their 
"maiden speech" in their chosen discipline. Grading will be S/U. 

497. Research. 1-15 hr. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 hr. PR: Consent. 

Note: This is an optional course for programs that believe that this level of control and supervision 
is needed during the writing of students' reports, theses, or dissertation. 

499. Colloquium. 1-6 hr. PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking course work credit but 
who wish to meet residence requirements, use the University's facilities, and participate in its 
academic and cultural programs. 

Note: Graduate students who are not actively involved in course work or research are entitled, 
through enrollment in his/her department's 499 Graduate Colloquium, to consult with graduate 
faculty, participate in both formal and informal academic activities sponsored by his/her program, 
and retain all of the rights and privileges of duly enrolled students. Grading is S/U; colloquium 
credit may not be counted against credit requirements for masters' programs. 

General Comment 

Graduate Council policy requires that any student in a master's program has a 
minimum of 24 hours of "regular" course work: "...a minimum of 24 hours of course 
work other than thesis credit is standard and a minimum of 30 total hours is 
also standard." 

Abbreviations Used in Course Listings 

I: a course given in the first (fall) term. 

II: a course given in the second (spring) term. 

I, II: a course given each term. 

I and II: a course given throughout the year. 

Yr: a course continued through two terms. 

S: a course given in the summer. 

Hr: credit hours per course. 

Lee: lecture period. 

Rec: recitation period. 

Lab: laboratory period. 

Cone: concurrent registration required. 

PR: prerequisite. 

Coreq: corequisite. 

Consent: consent of instructor required. 

CR: credit but no grade. 

An asterisk (*) following credit hours listed as variable indicates that the course 
normally carries three credit hours. Exceptions are made only in emergencies and 
must be approved by the departmental chair and by the professor teaching the course. 



52 WVU Graduate Catalog 



College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer 
Sciences 

Rosemary R. Haggett, Ph.D., Dean; Director of West Virginia Agricultural and 

Forestry Experiment Station 
Kerry S. Odell, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Development 
Jack E. Coster, Ph.D., Interim Associate Director, West Virginia Agricultural and Forestry 

Experiment Station 

The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences is comprised of five 
divisions: animal and veterinary sciences, family resources, forestry, plant and soil sci- 
ences, and resource management. The college's faculty and staff are located in four 
buildings on the Evansdale campus, in one building on the downtown campus, on farms 
administered by the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences in 
Kearneysville, Morgantown, Reedsville, Union, and Wardensville, and at the University 
Forest on nearby Chestnut Ridge. The College also operates the West Virginia 
University Child Development Laboratory (Nursery School). 

Students study many different subjects concerned with human behavior, plants, ani- 
mals, and microorganisms. Curricula in the college stress biological and chemical sciences, 
applied ecology, fabricated structures, and relationships among people as they live and 
work in a wide variety of settings. Courses offered in the College give students a com- 
prehensive understanding of the basic elements that interrelate with and affect our 
environment. 

The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences sponsors research via 
an organizational structure called the West Virginia Agricultural and Forestry 
Experiment Station. The Experiment Station is the mechanism through which most 
research proposals are generated, evaluated, approved, and funded. The University 
controls extensive lands, which are administered by the College, with specific areas set 
aside for research and teaching purposes in dairy, general livestock, poultry, forestry, 
wildlife management, horticulture, general agronomy, entomology, and soils. The re- 
quired instruction and analytic work is performed in the classrooms and laboratories of 
the University's facilities. 

College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences Graduate 
Programs 

Agricultural Education M.S. 

Agricultural and Resource Economics M.S. 

Agricultural Sciences Ph.D. 

Animal and Food Science, Plant and Soil Science 

Animal and Veterinary Sciences M.S. 

Animal Sciences, Breeding, Food Sciences, Nutrition, Physiology, 
Production 

Family and Consumer Sciences M.S. 

Child Development and Family Studies, Human Nutrition 

Forest Resources Science Ph.D. 

Forest Resources Management, Wildlife and Fisheries Management, 
Wood Science 

Forestry M.S.F. 

Genetics and Developmental Biology M.S., Ph.D. 

Natural Resource Economics Ph.D. 

Plant and Soil Sciences M.S. 



College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences 53 



Agronomy, Entomology, Environmental Microbiology, Horticulture, 
Plant Pathology 

Recreation and Parks Management M.S. 

Reproductive Physiology M.S., Ph.D. 

Wildlife and Fisheries Resources M.S. 

The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences currently offers five doc- 
toral programs: 

• Ph.D. in Agricultural Sciences. Doctoral students may choose from a major in 
either animal and food sciences or plant and soil sciences. 

• Ph.D. in Forest Resource Sciences. Doctoral students may choose from the fol- 

lowing majors: forest resource management, wildlife and fisheries management, or 
wood science. 

• Ph.D. in Natural Resource Economics. Doctoral students may choose from the fol- 

lowing majors: natural resource and environmental economics, commodity market 
analysis, modeling and forecasting, or international agricultural and rural resource 
development. 
The College directs two interdisciplinary doctoral programs. 

• Ph.D. in Genetics and Developmental Biology. Doctoral students may select from 16 
areas of emphasis related to human, plant, and animal genetics, and developmental 
biology. 

• Ph.D. in Reproductive Physiology. Doctoral students may select courses in bio- 
chemistry, developmental embryology, endocrinology, reproductive physiology, sta- 
tistics, and physiology. 

The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences offers many programs at 
the master's level. Students can choose from the following majors for a master's degree: 
agricultural and resource economics, agricultural education, animal sciences, family re- 
sources, forestry, plant sciences, recreation and parks management, or wildlife and fish- 
eries management. In addition, students may choose to pursue a master of science in 
the interdisciplinary programs in genetics and developmental biology or reproductive 
physiology. 

For additional information concerning any of the graduate programs in Agriculture, 
Forestry and Consumer Sciences contact the Associate Dean and Coordinator of Graduate 
Studies, College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences, P.O. Box 6108, West 
Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6108; Telephone (304) 293-2691. 

General Admission Requirements and Information 

Regular: A regular graduate student is a degree-seeking student who meets all of the 
criteria for regular admission to a program of his/her choice. The student must possess 
a baccalaureate degree from a college or university, have at least a grade-point average 
of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale (or an average of 3.0 or higher for the last 60 credit hours), meet 
all the criteria established by the degree program, and be under no requirements to make 
up deficiencies. 
The student must: 

1 . Have an adequate academic aptitude at the graduate level as measured by the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE), or the New Medical College Admissions Test 
(New MCAT). 

2. Provide three letters of reference from persons acquainted with the applicant's 
professional work, experience, or academic background. 

3. Submit a written statement of 500 words or more indicating the applicant's goals and 
objectives relative to receiving a graduate degree. 



54 WVU Graduate Catalog 



4. International students have the additional requirement to submit a minimum score 
of 550 on the TOEFL examination if their native language is not English. 

See the specific graduate programs for additional requirements. 
Provisional: A student may be admitted as provisional when the student possesses a 
baccalaureate degree but clearly does not meet the criteria for regular admission. The 
student may have incomplete credentials, deficiencies to make up, or may have a 
promising undergraduate scholastic record that is less than the 2.75 grade-point 
average or an average of 3.0 or higher in the last 60 credit hours required for regular 
admission. 

Non-Degree: A non-degree student is a student not admitted to a program. Admission 
as a non-degree student does not guarantee admission to any course or program. The 
reasons for non-admission may be late application, incomplete credentials, scholarship 
deficiencies, or lack of a degree objective. Even though a non-degree student has not 
been admitted to a graduate program, an academic unit may allow a non-degree student 
admission. A student must present evidence of a baccalaureate degree and obtain a 2.5 
grade-point average on the first 1 2 credit hours of course work and maintain this average 
as long as enrolled. A maximum of 1 2 credit hours of work as a non-degree student may 
be applied to a graduate degree if the student is later accepted into a graduate program. 
To be eligible to enter a degree program, the student must maintain a minimum of a 3.0 
grade-point average on all course work taken since admission as a graduate student. 

Graduate Faculty 

* Indicates associate membership in the graduate faculty. 

* Indicates regular membership in the graduate faculty. 

Animal and Veterinary Sciences 
Professors 

*William E. Collins, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Bovine reproduction. 

Robert A. Dailey, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Reproductive physiology. 

William H. Hoover, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Animal nutrition. 

f E. Keith Inskeep, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Reproductive physiology. 

f Paul E. Lewis, Ph.D. (WVU). Reproductive physiology. 

f RonaldA. Peterson, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Nutrition. Physiology-poultry. 

f Edward C. Prigge, Ph.D. (U. Maine). Animal nutrition. 

f John E. Warren, Ph.D. (U. of Md.). Director. Reproductive Physiology. 

Associate Professors 

"•"Hillar Klandorf, Ph.D. (U. Edinburgh). Poultry physiology. 

*Phillip I. Osborne, Ph.D. (Clemson U.). Extension Specialist. Livestock marketing and production. 

f Richard Russell, Ph.D. (Iowa St. U.). Animal nutrition. 

*Wayne R. Wagner, Ph.D. (Colo. St. U.). Extension Specialist. Animal breeding and genetics. 

Assistant Professors 

f P. Brett Kenney, Ph.D. (Kansas St. U.). Meat Science. 

tJohn Killifer, Ph.D. (Ore. St. U.). Biochemistry. Molecular genetics. 

Family and Consumer Sciences 
Professors 

f Wanda F. Franz, Ph.D. (WVU). Human development, Cognitive development theory. 

f Mary K. Head, R.D., Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Experimental foods, Applied human nutrition, Food and 

dietary evaluation. 
*Nora M. MacDonald, M.S. (Iowa St. U.). Apparel design, Clothing for special needs, Fashion 

merchandising. 
T M. Zafar Alam Nomani, Ph.D. (Rutgers U.). Dietary fiber, Cholesterol, Protein and energy 

metabolism, Nutritional assessment, International nutrition. 



College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences 55 



Associate Professors 

*Marian Beth Liddell, Ed.D. (WVU). Curriculum, Instruction, Supervision. 

'Charlotte Nath, Ed.D. (WVU). Adjunct. 

'Richard Strasberger, Ed.D. (WVU). Adjunct. Special education, Parenting education. 

f Bobbie Gibson Warash, Ed.D. (WVU). Preschool curriculum. 

Assistant Professors 

f Hazel A. Bourne Hiza, Ph.D. (Harvard U.). Applied human nutrition, Pregnancy and nutrition. 

'Chet Johnson, M.D. (U. Kansas). Adjunct. Child development. 

'Shirley Lazorchak, Ph.D. (Ohio State). Fashion merchandising, Historic costume. 

tCarol Markstrom, Ph.D. (Utah St. U.). Family, Adolescents, Social contexts. 

'Dottie D. Rauch, M.Ed. (Penn. St. U.). Family resource management. 

'Susan Rodman, Ed.D. (WVU). Adjunct. Statistics. 

Lecturer 

'Betty Forbes, M.A. (WVU). 

Forestry 
Professors 

'Jack E. Coster, Ph.D. (Tex. A&M U.). Forestry, Entomology. 

f Ray R. Hicks, Jr., Ph.D. (SUNY). Forest Management. Forest ecology, Forest pest management. 

r David E. Samuel, Ph.D. (WVU). Wildlife and Fisheries Management. Policy and administration, 
Wildlife attitudes, Hunter education. 

^tanislaw Jan Tajchman, Ph.D. (U. Munich). Forest Management. Forest meteorology. 

T Robert C. Whitmore, Ph.D. (B. Young U.). Wildlife and Fisheries Management. Avian ecology, 
Quantitative ecology. 

Associate Professors 

Barnes P. Armstrong, Ph.D. (SUNY). Wood Science. Physical properties and hardwood drying. 

'William N. Grafton, M.S.F. (WVU). Extension specialist , Wildlife. 

f Curt C. Hassler, Ph.D. (VPI&SU). Leader, Appalachian Hardwood Center. Wood Science. 
Harvesting, Quantitative methods. 

Steven J. Hollenhorst, Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Recreation and Parks. Wilderness management. 

Joseph McNeel, Ph.D. (VPI & SU). Director. Forest Engineering/Forest operation. Simulations. 

Steven W. Selin, Ph.D. (U. Ore.). Recreation and parks, Parks and tourism management. 

Assistant Professors 

R. Bruce Anderson, PH.D. (VPI & SU). Wood Science, Forest products technology. 

f Ben E. Dawson-Andoh, Ph.D. (U. British Columbia). Wood science. Wood chemistry and 
biodeterioration. 

r John Edwards, Ph.D. (Clemson U.) Wildlife and Fisheries management. Upland ecology. 

Wary Ann Fajvan, Ph.D. (U. Maine). Forest management, Quantitative silviculture. 

'Rory F. Fraser, Ph.D. (PSU). Forest management. Forest economics and international trade. 

t Linda S. Gribko, Ph.D. (WVU). Forest management. Integrated resources management and 
planning. Geographic Information Systems. 

f Kyle J. Hartman, Ph.D. (U. of MD). Wildlife and fisheries management. Fish ecology. 

Elmer Lang, Ph.D. (VPI & SU). Wood Science, Wood mechanics, Wood-based composite 

materials. 

'Patricia Mazik, Ph.D. (Memphis State U.). Adjunct. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. 
Fish physiology. 

T Michael Schuett, Ph.D. (U. of MN). Recreation and parks. Recreation resource management, envi- 
ronmental interpretation and education. 

Theresa Wang, Ph.D. (U. of MN). Recreation and parks. Recreation resource management, envi- 
ronmental interpretation and education. 

tPetra B. Wood, Ph.D. (U. Fla.). Adjunct. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Wildlife 
ecology. 



56 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Genetics and Developmental Biology 
Professors 

Linda Butler, Ph.D. (U. Ga.). Entomology. Forest entomology, Pest management. 

Nyles Charon, Ph.D. (U. Minn.). Medical bacteriology, Genetics and physiology ofspirochetes. 

Walter J. Kaczmarczyk, Ph.D. (Hahnemann Med. Col.). Biochemical genetics, Biochemistry. 

Edward C. Keller, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Ecological genetics, Population genetics. 

Gregory W. Konat, Ph.D. (U. Odense). Myelinogenis, Chromatin and gene expression. 

Daniel M. Lewis, Ph.D. (WVU). Adjunct. Immunology, Mechanism of immunological reactions in 

the lung. 
Joseph P. Morton, Ph.D. (Mont. St. U.). Ecological, developmental and molecular studies in fungi. 
Joginder Nath, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Chairperson. Cytogenetics, Evolution, Mutagenetics. 
Tong-man Ong, Ph.D. (Illinois St. U.). Adjunct. Mutagenesis toxicology. 
Robert S. Pore, Ph.D. (U. Cal.). Mycology, Pathobiology, Mycoses. 
Donald A. Sens, Ph.D. (U. SC). Pathology, Microbiology, Molecular genetics. 
Mary Ann Sens, M.D., Ph.D. (U. SC). Perinatal pathology. 

William Sorenson, Ph.D. (U. Tx.). Adjunct. Role of fungi in occupational lung disease. 
William V. Thayne, Ph.D. (U. Illinois). Statistics, Statistical genetics. 
Knox Van Dyke, Ph.D. (St. Louis U.). Chemiluminescence in human cells, Effects of anti-inflationary 

drugs on chemiluminescence. 
William Wallace, Ph.D. (WVU). Adjunct. Surface spectroscopy and genetic toxicology of respirable 

mineral and organic particles. 
Sharon L. Wenger, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Clinical cytogenetics. 
Associate Professors 

Keith Garbutt, Ph.D. (U. Wales). Population genetics. 

Ann Hubbs, Ph.D. (Co. St. U.). Adjunct. Veterinary toxicologic pathology, Mechanisms of toxic injury. 
Hillar Klandorf, Ph.D. (U. Edinburgh). Endocrinology. 
Dennis O. Overman, Ph.D. (U. Mich.). Teratology, Organ culture. 
Jeanine Strobl, Ph.D. (Geo. Wash. U.). Estrogen receptor mechanisms. 
David B. Yelton, Ph.D. (U. Mass.). Microbial genetics, Bacteriophage, Molecular genetics. 
Assistant Professors 

Rajeev Arora, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Perturbations related to low temperature stress. 
Brad Hillgartner, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Nutritional control of gene expression, Thyroid hormone action. 
Wei-Shau Hu, Ph.D. (U.C.-Davis). Retrovirus recombination and replication, Mechanisms of oncogene 

transduction, Human gene therapy. 
Daniel Panacionne, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Gene cloning, Gene transfer. 
Vinay Pathak, Ph.D. (U.C.-Davis). Retroviral genetics, Isolation of anitoncogenes. 
Mohamdi A. Sarkar, Ph.D. (Virg. Comm. U.). Etiology of uterine and bladder cancers. 
James Sheil, Ph.D. (U. Ky.). Immunology, Mechanisms of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated antigen 

recognition and effector function. 
John H. Todd, Ph.D. (U. SC). Biopathology. 

Plant and Soil Sciences 
Professors 

Barnes W. Amrine, Jr., Ph.D. (Iowa St. U.). Entomology. Medical entomology, Apiculture, Biological 

control. 
r Barton S. Baker, Ph.D. (WVU). Director. Agronomy. Forage crops. 
tJohn A. Balasko, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Agronomy. Forage crops. 
*John F. Baniecki, Ph.D. (U. Ariz.). Extension. Plant Pathology. Plant disease identification and 

control. 
Bradford C. Bearce, Ph.D. (U. Calif.). Horticulture. Florist and nursery crops. 
f Alan R. Biggs, Ph.D. (PSU). Plant pathology, Tree fruits. 

T Gary K. Bissonnette, Ph.D. (Mont. St. U.). Environmental microbiology, Aquatic microbiology. 
William B. Bryan, Ph.D. (Iowa St. U.). Agronomy. Pastures. 

f Linda Butler, Ph.D. (U. Ga.). Entomology. Forest entomology, Pest management, Lepidoptera. 
tHenry W. Hogmire, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Entomology. Tree fruit entomology, Integrated pest 

management. 



College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences 57 



T Walter J. Kaczmarczyk, Ph.D. (Hahnemann Med. C). Genetics. Biochemical genetics. 
"•"William L. MacDonald, Ph.D. (Iowa St. U.). Plant Pathology. Forest and shade tree diseases. 
^Joseph B. Morton, Ph.D. (Mont. St. U.). Plant Pathology. Mycorrhizal interactions, Field crop 

diseases, 
^oginder Nath, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Genetics. Cytogenetics, Evolution, Mutagenesis. 
tJohn C. Sencindiver, Ph.D. (WVU). Agronomy. Soil science, Soil genesis and classification, Land 

reclamation. 
Jeffrey Skousen, Ph.D. (Tex. A&M U.). Extension specialist. Land reclamation. 
*Richard K. Zimmerman, Ph.D. (WVU). Extension, Plant Sciences. Plant sciences, Conservation. 
Associate Professors 
T Alan J. Sexstone, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Environmental Microbiology. Nutrient cycling and 

biodegradation of pollutants. 
Assistant Professors 

f Rajeev Arora, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Horticulture, Plant physiology, Environmental stress. 
r John Hinz, Ph.D. (Iowa State). Weed science, Agronomy. 
H.ouis McDonald, Ph.D. (U. KY). Soil chemistry. 
r Daniel Panacionne, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Gene cloning, Gene transfer. 

Resource Management 
Professors 

tDale K. Colyer, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Production economics. Rural development. 

Robert G. Diener, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Agricultural and environmental technology, Electricity, Agri- 
cultural mechanization research. 

herald J. Fletcher, Ph.D. (U. Cal.). Agricultural and resource economics, Resource economics. 

^tacy A. Gartin, Ph. D. (Ohio St. U.). Agricultural education, Communications, Program planning, 
Leadership development, Adult education, Teaching methods. 

Hesfa Gebremedhin, Ph.D. (Okla. St. U.). Agricultural and resource economics. Farm manage- 
ment, Agribusiness. 

*Alon Kvashny, Ed. D. (WVU). Landscape architecture. Site design, Landscape construction. 

Walter C. Labys, Ph.D. (U. Nottingham). Mineral and energy economics. Commodity modeling. 

T Layle D. Lawrence, Ph.D. (LSU). Agricultural Education. Social science, Curriculum development, 
Teaching methods. 

'George W. Longenecker, M.F.A. (U. Illinois). Landscape Architecture. Plant identification, Planting 
design. 

f Tim T Phipps, Ph.D. (U. Cal.). Agricultural and resource economics. Agricultural policy. 

^eter V. Schaeffer, Ph.D. (U.S.C.). Director, Resource management. Regional science, Applied 
microeconomics. 

r Dennis K. Smith, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Agricultural and resource economics. Rural development. 

Thomas Torries, Ph.D. (Penn St. U.). Mineral and energy resource economics. 

Associate Professors 

'Donald R. Armstrong, M.L.A. (Iowa St. U.). Landscape architecture. Site design, Design 
implementation. 

f Alan R. Collins, Ph.D. (Ore. St. U.). Agricultural and resource economics. 

Gerard E. D'Souza, Ph.D. (Miss. St. U.). Agricultural and resource economics. 

'Alexander G. Karther, M.F.A. (U. Okla.). Landscape Architecture. Design communication, Design 
methodology. 

*Steven B. McBride, M.L.A. (U. Mass.). Landscape construction, Site design, Visual impact analysis. 

T Kerry S. Odell, Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Associate Dean. Rural education, Computer application, Lead- 
ership development. 

'Charles B. Yuill, M.L.A. (U. Mass.). GIS. Computer applications, Landscape planning. 

Assistant Professors 

Gary J. Wingenback. Ph.D. (Iowa State). Computer applications. Leadership development. 



58 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Reproductive Physiology 
Professors 

'Robert Cochrane, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Adjunct. Reproduction in laboratory and fur animals. 

"William E. Collins, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Endocrinology of bovine reproduction. 

r Robert A. Dailey, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Neuroendocrine control of reproduction, Follicular development, 

Ovulation. 
Wark Gibson, M.D. (Case W. Reserve U.). Ovarian and uterine functions. 
T Robert L. Goodman, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Neuroendocrine control of ovarian function. 
f E. Keith Inskeep, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Uterine and ovarian prostaglandins in sheep and cattle. 
f Paul E. Lewis, Ph.D. (WVU). Puberty, Postpartum and seasonal anestrus as limiting factors in 

reproduction. 
Michael G. Mawhinney, Ph.D. (WVU). Endocrine pharmacology and metabolism of male sex 

accessory tissues. 
T Joginder Nath, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Genetics and evolution. 
Associate Professor 

tHillar Klandorf, Ph.D. (U. Edinburgh). Poultry physiology. 
Assistant Professor 
Gorges A. Flores (Geo. Wash. U.). Hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian interactions. 



Agricultural Education 

Peter V. Schaeffer, Director, Division of Resource Management 
Stacy A. Gartin, Graduate Program Coordinator 
2052 Agricultural Sciences Building 
Degree Offered: Master of Science 

Prerequisites 

The agricultural and environmental education faculty offers master's programs for 
persons desiring advanced study in teaching agriculture in public schools, communica- 
tions and leadership, extension education, or environmental technology. Candidates for 
the master of science degree may be admitted on a regular or provisional basis. A 
student who does not have a B.S. in agriculture with a major in agricultural and 
environmental education may be required to complete undergraduate courses in 
agriculture and professional education if he or she plans to obtain certification to teach. 
Students in the curriculum take graduate courses in both technical and professional 
education. 

Programs are planned to ensure that candidates develop competence in: 

• communications and leadership 

• design, operation and philosophy of agricultural and environmental education 
programs 

• research and evaluation processes 

In addition, students pursuing programs that emphasize agricultural and extension 
education will be expected to develop an understanding of teaching/learning processes 
whereas those emphasizing environmental technology will develop competence in 
technological aspects of environmental management. 

All graduate courses offered toward the degree must be approved by the student's 
advisor. A thesis is required as part of the 30 credit hour graduation requirement. 

Agricultural and Environmental Education (AGEE) 

230. Farm Structures. II. 3 HR. Study of structures required for agriculture, family housing, storage, 
and recreation. Includes function, planning, layout, materials, construction techniques, prefabrica- 
tion, repair, remodeling, and costs. 2 HR. rec, 3 HR. lab. 



Agricultural Education 59 



240. Agricultural Engines. I, II. 3 HR. Study of power sources (gasoline, diesel, turbine, wankel, etc.) 
for agriculture and forestry. Operating, selection, maintenance techniques, and emissions impact 
on power and fuel efficiency. 2 HR. rec, 3 HR. lab. 

250. Engineering Technology for Urban Watersheds and Irrigation. 3 HR. Soil and water manage- 
ment; analysis of small watersheds and design of waterways, culverts, ponds, sediment basins, and 
turf irrigation systems. 3 HR. lee. 

255. Advanced Farm Machinery. I. 3 HR. Systems approach to selection, use and operation of 
machinery related to agriculture, forestry and other rural activities. Emphasis on safety and en- 
vironmental impact. Use of records for management decisions, purchase, replacement, sale, or 
overhaul. 2 HR. rec, 3 HR. lab. 

260. Principles of Cooperative Extension. I. 2 HR. PR: Consent. History, philosophy, and mission of 
the cooperative extension service. Roles and functions of extension faculty in developing and pre- 
senting extension programs. 

261 . Methods in Extension Education. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Organization and preparation for exten- 
sion teaching and the processes of communication. 

262. Agricultural and Natural Resource Communications. I, II. 3 HR. Procedures and practices in 
developing, interpreting, and communicating agricultural and natural resource information; empha- 
sis on visual materials and effective presentations. (3 HR. lee.) 

263. Adult Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Planning and prepa- 
ration for teaching adult classes and advising agricultural organizations. 

270. Electricity and Lighting. 3 HR. Properties of electricity and electrical circuits, residential wiring, 
selection of electric motors, use of electrical controls; and design of interior lighting, landscape 
lighting, and flood lighting systems. (Field trip required.) 

280. Agricultural Mechanics Problems. 1-4 HR. PR: C or better in an AGEE course. Special projects 
and problems in theoretical analysis, design, or construction. 1-4 HR. conference. 

290. Waste Management-Composting. 3 HR. 

321 . Advanced Farm Mechanics. 3 HR. 

362. Program Development and Evaluation in Extension. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Planning, imple- 
mentation, and evaluation of programs in rural and community development. 

364. Supervision of Agricultural Experience Programs. S. 3 HR. PR: AGED 160 or consent. Plan- 
ning supervision and evaluating experience programs of secondary students and adults. 

460. Planning Agricultural Programs and Courses. S. 3 HR. PR: AGED 160 or consent. Formulating 
programs and courses for schools and communities. 

491 . Advanced Study. 1 -6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 



60 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Peter V. Schaeffer, Director, Division of Resource Management 
Gerard D' Souza, Graduate Program Coordinator 
2018 Agricultural Sciences Building 
Degree Offered: Master of Science 

The master of science in agricultural and resource economics provides advanced train- 
ing in the areas of environmental, natural resource, agricultural, mineral, energy, and 
rural development economics. The degree prepares students for further graduate study 
and a wide variety of careers in the private sector and government. 

Admission Requirements 

Prospective graduate students initiate application for admission on forms available 
from the University Office of Admissions and Records. The completed form should be re- 
turned to the Office of Admissions and Records, accompanied by payment of the nonre- 
fundable application fee. An official transcript from all colleges attended during an applicant's 
undergraduate and graduate studies must be a part of the application for admission. 

In addition to general requirements, students must have: 

• Three letters of recommendation, 

• Twelve or more semester credits in economics, agricultural and resource econom- 
ics, statistics, or appropriate social science courses (should include intermediate 
microeconomics), 

• Three or more semester hours of credit in calculus, 

• A grade-point average of 2.75 for all credit in economics and agricultural and 
resource economics, and 

• A letter of purpose describing research interests and professional aspirations is 
required. 

Students seeking the degree of master of science in agricultural and resource eco- 
nomics may be accepted on a regular or provisional basis. The Admissions Committee 
reviews and evaluates all applications. Applicants who do not meet all of the require- 
ments above but have special qualifications may be admitted on a provisional basis. 
Such admission will usually be subject to conditions, however, such as taking course 
work to make up for deficiencies. Such make-up work will not be counted as part of the 
credit requirements for the degree. Scores from the Graduate Record Examination are 
required from all applicants. 

A student whose native language is not English must have obtained a minimum score 
of 550 on the TOEFL examination. 

Thesis Option 

Either a thesis or a course work option may be selected. Students should select the 
option by the time 12 hours of course work are completed (usually by the end of the first 
semester in the program) and after consulting with their graduate committees. Candi- 
dates with graduate research assistantships should select the thesis option. 

Course Work Option 

• A minimum of 30 credit hours of approved work to include not more than six hours of 
credit for the thesis, and enough courses to provide proficiency in economics, re- 
source, and agricultural and resource economics. Courses in closely related areas 
may be included. The student's graduate committee must approve the student's 
course of study and thesis topic. 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 61 



• A minimum of 36 credit hours of approved course work to provide proficiency in 
economics, resource, and agricultural and resource economics. Courses in closely 
related areas may be included if approved by the student's graduate committee. 

• The student must satisfactorily complete a written and oral examination adminis- 
tered by the graduate committee. 

Plan of Study 

Each candidate's plan of study is developed by the student in consultation with his/her 
major professor and graduate committee. Normally, the plan of study will include gradu- 
ate-level courses in economic theory, resource economics, environmental economics, 
statistics, and agricultural and resource economics. The plan of study should be devel- 
oped during the first term of study. 

GPA Requirement 

A minimum grade-point average of 3.0 is required for all graduate credit courses. This 
includes graduate credit transferred and graduate credit accumulated while pursuing a 
degree in agricultural and resource economics. Persons requesting transfers of graduate 
credit must obtain approval of their graduate committee for such transfers. 

Research Assistantships 

A limited number of graduate research assistantships is available to highly qualified 
students on a competitive basis. The awards are based on academic merit only. 

Agricultural and Resource Economics (ARE) 

201 . Applied Demand Analysis. II. 3 HR. Consumer demand economics applied to environmental, 
natural resource, and agricultural issues; analysis of factors that influence demand and deter- 
mine prices; special applications to non-market, environmental, and natural resource amenities. 

202. Applied Production Economics. I. 3 HR. Production economics applied to agricultural, envi- 
ronmental, and natural resource issues; production, multiple-product and cost functions, and joint 
production; effects of environmental and natural resource management regulations on the pro- 
duction process. 

206. Agribusiness Planning. I. 3 HR. PR: ARE 104 or consent. Application of economic and man- 
agement principles to agribusiness planning; consideration of risk and uncertainty in agribusiness 
planning; formulation of economic models for determining optimum allocation of resources for 
production processes. 

210. Environmental and Resource Economics. I. 3 HR. PR: ARE 201 and 202; or ECON 211; or 
consent. Economic analysis of natural resource and environmental problems; management of 
renewable and nonrenewable resources and environmental amenities; market failure, externali- 
ties, benefit-cost and risk analysis; property rights and the "taking" issue. 

211. Rural Economic Development. I.3HR. Economic trends, development policies, and analysis 
of rural economies in the United States. Rural diversity, development concepts, rural planning, 
public programs and policies, and community analysis methods. 

220. Agricultural Cooperatives. I. 3 HR. History, principles, organization, management, taxation, 
and legal aspects of agricultural, marketing, supply and service cooperatives in the U.S. Develop- 
ment of non-agricultural cooperatives. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

231. Marketing Agricultural Products. II. 3 HR. Organization, functions, and analysis of the agri- 
cultural marketing system. Food consumption, exports, price analysis, marketing costs, market 
power, commodities futures market, food safety, and government regulations. 

235. Marketing Livestock Products. I. 3 HR. Livestock marketing practices and policies. Supply 
and demand, livestock price cycles, grading, marketing alternatives, processing and retailing. 
Economic analysis of alternatives, current issues and trends. (Offered in fall of even years.) 



62 WVU Graduate Catalog 






240. Futures Markets and Commodity Prices. I. 3 HR. Analysis of price-making forces which 
operate in the market place; emphasis on major agricultural and mineral commodity and futures 
markets. 

245. Energy Economics. II. 3 HR. Analysis of the energy sector and its relationship to the rest of 
the economy; energy security, deregulation, full cost pricing, substitutability among energy sources, 
transmission, new technologies, environmental considerations. 

250. Agricultural, Environmental and Resource Policy. II. 3 HR. PR: ARE 201 , 202; or ECON 211 ; 
or consent. Economic analysis of agricultural, natural resource and environmental policies; prob- 
lems of externalities and market failure, and alternative policies for addressing such problems; 
benefits and costs of alternative policies. 

261. Agribusiness Finance. II. 3 HR. An overview of financial analysis and the application of 
financial principles to small, rural and agricultural businesses. Includes applications of financial 
analysis computer software. 

300. Applied Microeconomics I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 211 and 220 or equiv. Producer and consumer 
economics used in resource, environmental, and agricultural economic analysis. 

321. Quantitative Methods in Resource Economics. I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 220 or equiv. Optimiza- 
tion techniques in economic analysis of natural resources; environmental and agricultural man- 
agement problems; linear, nonlinear and dynamic programming. 

324. Econometric Methods in Resource Economics. I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 226. Application methods 
to natural resource, environmental, and agricultural economic problems; single and simultaneous 
equation models, specification problems, topics in time series, and cross-sectional analysis. 

329. Resource Commodity Markets. II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 325 and 326 or consent. Advanced 
econometric methods of specification, estimation and simulation of domestic and international 
resource markets and industries; time series and forecasting techniques. 

330. Production Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and ARE 321. Developments in producer 
economics applied to natural resource, environmental, and agricultural issues. 

332. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and 321 or equiv. 
Theory and institutions; market failure, externalities and property rights issues; renewable and 
nonrenewable resources, common property, environmental and resource management, and 
intergenerational decisions. 

333. Natural Resource Policy Analysis. I. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and 321 or equiv. Welfare econom- 
ics applied to the analysis and evaluation of natural resource, environmental, agricultural, and 
energy policy issues. 

340. Rural and Regional Development. II. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and 321 . Economic theories and 
quantitative techniques. Problems and goals for rural and regional planning; methods of policy 
analysis for community infrastructure development. 

342. International Agricultural Economic Development. I. 3 HR. Current problems, theories, poli- 
cies, and strategies in planning for agricultural and rural development for increased food produc- 
tion and to improve the well-being of rural people in the developing countries of the world. 

343. Project Analysis & Evaluation. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Design, analysis, and evaluation of 
development projects; economic and financial aspects of project analysis; risk analysis; prepara- 
tion of feasibility reports. 

344. International Markets and Trade. I. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and 321 . Causes and consequences 
of international trade and investment; commodity market structures, commodity price instability 
and international agreements; trade barriers and protection, export promotion, and impacts on 
developing countries. 

365. Mineral Finance. II. 3 HR. Methods, risks, and problems of financing mineral projects. Large 
foreign-project financing, concerns of host governments, multinational mining concerns, and fi- 
nancial institutions. 



Agricultural and Resource Economics 63 



380. Energy Industry Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: Graduate standing. Technical production and 
consumption methodologies, environmental concerns, and national and global economics and 
politics in making energy decisions. 

381 . Resource Appraisal and Decision Making. II. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 or equiv. Investment analy- 
sis, decision making under risk and uncertainty, and project analysis applied to resource explora- 
tion and utilization; mineral and energy reserve and resource estimation techniques. 

382. Mineral Industry Economics. II. 3 HR. Supply, demand, structure, technology, costs, prices, 
and problems of mineral industries. 

400. Research Methods. 11.1 HR. Research methods in agricultural, environmental and resource 
economics. The application of scientific thinking in developing research proposals and critiquing 
published research. 

403. Advanced Natural Resource Economic Theory. I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and ARE 332. Allo- 
cation and distribution of natural resources in static and dynamic contexts; welfare economics, 
cost-benefit analysis, and optimal control approaches; applications to resource valuation, ex- 
haustion, taxation, and regulation in theory and practice. 

410. Advanced Environmental Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and ARE 332 or consent. 
Theory, efficient environmental design and analysis, modeling of economic and environmental 
systems, evaluation of non-market benefits and costs, and risk assessment. 

446. Energy and Regional Development. II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 355 and ARE 380. Energy in the West 
Virginia economy and selected regions of the United States. 

483. Minerals Technology Assessment. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Methods of studying the effects of 
modifications in technology on the production of utilization of minerals, and the effects on mineral 
demand, supply, substitution, and markets. 

484. Oil and Gas Industry Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Geology, engineering, and economic 
theories of evaluating industry structures and performance. 

485. Economics of the Coal Industry. Supply, demand, structure, production technology, costs, 
prices, and problems of the coal industry. Includes environmental, productivity, and transportation 
issues. 

495. Independent Study. I, II. 1-4HR. PR: Consent. Faculty-supervised study of topics not available 
through regular course offerings. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR 

Resource Management (RESM) 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. 

496. Graduate Seminar. I, II, S. 1 HR. PR: Consent. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 

Landscape Architecture (LARC) 

229. Landscape Architecture. I. 3 HR. PR: For non-Landscape Architecture majors only. An ap- 
preciation of the basic principles of planting design and information pertaining to the use of orna- 
mental plants around the home. 2 HR. lee, One 2-HR. studio. 

248. Design Analysis. II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Analysis of planning and design projects to offer 
solutions to a given problem. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 



64 WVU Graduate Catalog 



250. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design 1. I. 5 HR. PR: LARC 132 and LARC 151 and 
LARC 162. Comprehensive design problems integrating all aspects of site design, planting de- 
sign and construction. Includes advanced projects for urban and rural sites. 2 HR. lee; Two 3-HR. 
studios. 

251 . Advanced Landscape Architectural Design 2. 5 HR. PR: LARC 250. A comprehensive prob- 
lem in Landscape Architecture in which the student demonstrates proficiency acquired from their 
program of study. 2 HR. lee, Two 3-HR. studios. 

252. Contemporary Issues in Landscape Architecture. II. 2 HR. PR: LARC 250; Cone: LARC 251 . 
A series of seminar discussions exploring current and future trends in the practice of landscape 
architectural design, planning, and management. 2 HR. lee. 

265. Regional Design. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Consideration of regional landscapes in order to 
effectively relate design to the ecology and development of a region. (Offered in spring of even 
years.) 

284. Professional Practice. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Procedures in preparation of contract docu- 
ments, fees, estimates, operation of an office, and relationship to clients and contractors. 
3HR. lee. 



Agricultural Sciences 

Rosemary R. Haggett, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Forestry 

and Consumer Sciences 
1 170 Agricultural Sciences Building 
Degree Offered: Doctor of Philosophy 

The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer Sciences offers graduate studies 
leading to the degree of doctor of philosophy in agricultural sciences. The doctoral pro- 
gram offers two majors: animal and food sciences, and plant and soil sciences. Students 
entering this program may select research and classes to emphasize environmental 
microbiology, agronomy, animal nutrition, entomology, horticulture, or plant pathology. 
The objective of the degree program is to provide doctoral students an opportunity to 
study and conduct research with faculty in areas of excellence within the College. Re- 
search and training in the various disciplines are under ten areas of emphasis in the 
college: agricultural biochemistry, animal nutrition, animal physiology, production man- 
agement, crops agronomy, entomology, environmental microbiology, horticulture, plant 
pathology, and soil sciences. 

Admission Requirements 

Prospective students initiate application for admission on forms available from the 
WVU Office of Admissions and Records. The completed forms should be returned to the 
Office of Admissions and Records, accompanied by payment of the nonrefundable spe- 
cial service fee. An official transcript from all colleges attended in the course of an 
applicant's masters and undergraduate degrees must be part of the application for ad- 
mission. Applicants must hold a master's or its equivalent to be eligible for admission into 
the program. 

The following admission and performance standards are normally required in the 
doctor of philosophy in agriculture sciences program: 

• An applicant must possess a master's degree and hold a grade-point average (GPA) 
of 3.0 or above (on a 4.0 scale) in postgraduate courses. 

• The graduate record examination is required. For regular admission a minimum 
score of 1300 is expected. 



Agricultural Sciences 65 



• A student whose native language is not English must have obtained a minimum 
score of 550 on the TOEFL examination. 

• An applicant must provide three letters of reference. 

• A one to two page letter of intent from the student describing his/her research and 
professional aspirations is required. 

Students who do not meet the requirements, but have special qualifications or 
circumstances, may be admitted as provisional graduate students if approved by the 
graduate faculty committee, division director, and doctoral program coordinator. 

After a student is admitted into the doctoral program, the appropriate division director 
will appoint a major professor in the appropriate field of study. Doctoral students will 
conduct research in support of projects approved by the West Virginia Agriculture and 
Forestry Experiment Station (WVAFES) or externally funded grants. The major profes- 
sor, in consultation with the student and the division director, will select a graduate 
committee within the first semester of study. The committee will consist of five or more 
members, the majority of whom must be WVU faculty, with at least one member 
representing a discipline outside the CAF & CS. Each student and his/her committee will 
formulate a plan of study, which will be filed in the office of the doctoral program 
coordinator. WVU regulations concerning committee membership will apply, namely, 
that the chairman and at least two committee members must be regular members of the 
CAF & CS graduate faculty. 

Core Courses 

Doctoral students must satisfactorily complete a set of core courses before they will 
be admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. All core courses will be at the 300- or 400- 
level, except where indicated below. Certain course requirements may be waived, if the 
student has received equivalent training in prior course work. Additional course work 
pertaining to the student's area of specialization will be determined by the student's 
major professor and graduate committee. Core courses for students in the doctoral 
program in Agricultural Sciences will be in the following areas. 

• A minimum of six credit-hours of course work must be completed in the biological 
or earth sciences (excluding courses within a student's major field of study). 

• A minimum of six credit-hours must be completed in biochemistry or advanced 
chemistry (200-level or above), depending on the student's research concentration. 

• A two-semester sequence (minimum of six credits) must be completed in graduate 
level statistics, plus a course in experimental design OR a two-semester sequence 
(minimum of six credits) must be completed in graduate-level statistics plus one 
semester (minimum of three credits) of computer science beyond the introductory 
level. 

• One seminar must be presented during each year or part of year in residence. A final 
dissertation research seminar will be presented as a college/university wide 
seminar. 

• Oral and written comprehensive (qualifying) examinations will be administered by 
the student's graduate committee before the end of the second year following 
admission to the program. Satisfactory completion of the comprehensive examina- 
tions and core course requirements will admit the student to candidacy for the Ph.D. 

Each candidate for the Ph.D. will be expected to meet the following general requirements: 

• A minimum of three semesters in residence, 

• Successful completion of course work requirements with a grade-point average of 
3.0 or higher, 

• Successful completion of comprehensive examinations prepared and evaluated by 
the student's graduate committee. Oral and written qualifying exams will be taken 
before the end of the second year following admission to the program, 

66 WVU Graduate Catalog 






• A dissertation, with the dissertation research applied toward an approved Experiment 
Station project or an approved independently funded research project, and 

• Successful oral defense of the dissertation. 

Although not required, presentation of research results at meetings of a professional 
society and submission of manuscripts for publication are encouraged. 



Animal and Veterinary Sciences 

John E. Warren, Director, Division of Animal and Veterinary Sciences 
Hi liar Kiandorf, Graduate Program Coordinator 
G038 Agricultural Sciences Building 
Degree Offered: Master of Science 

The master of science in animal and veterinary sciences in the College of Agriculture and 
Forestry allows maximum flexibility in courses and research problems. Students may em- 
phasize physiology, production, nutrition or food sciences. They may work with beef and 
dairy cattle, sheep, swine, poultry, or laboratory animals. Research problems in farm ani- 
mals form the basis for many studies, but a comparative approach is emphasized. 

Prerequisites 

Additional requirements are similar to those in other biological sciences. The student 
should have completed basic courses in the physical and biological sciences, including 
genetics, nutrition, and physiology. Deficiencies may prolong the time needed to com- 
plete degree programs. 

A composite graduate record examination score of 1 ,000 or better will be considered 
as a basis of admission. The fact that an applicant meets the above requirements shall 
not guarantee admission since each professor will accept only the number of students 
that can be supervised adequately with available facilities, time, and funds. Students 
interested in the Ph.D. should apply for admission to the doctoral program in agricultural 
sciences or reproductive physiology. 

Agricultural Biochemistry (AGBI) 

210. Introductory Biochemistry. I, II. 3 HR. PR: 8 HR. General chemistry, CHEM 131 or equiva- 
lent. Introduction to chemistry of cellular constituents (proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, lip- 
ids, nucleic acids, enzymes, and coenzymes) and their metabolism in animals and plants. 

211. Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory. I. 1 HR. Cone: AGBI 210. Experiments to demon- 
strate certain principles and properties of animal and plant biochemicals. 

212. Nutritional Biochemistry. II. 3 HR. PR: AGBI 210 or consent. Nutritional biochemistry of do- 
mestic animals. 

213. Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratory. II. 1 HR. PR: AGBI 210 and AGBI 211 and Cone: AGBI 
212. Experiments to determine the nutritional constituents in animal and plant tissues. 

31 0. General Biochemistry. I. 4 HR. PR: 8 HR. organic chemistry. The first half of a general course 
of biochemistry designed for graduate students of biological sciences. The course emphasizes 
the chemical properties of cellular constituents. 

311. Laboratory Experiments in Biochemistry. I. 2 HR. PR or Cone: AGBI 310. Experiments de- 
signed to demonstrate some of the basic tools and procedures of biochemical research. 

312. General Biochemistry. II. 4 HR. PR: AGBI 310 or consent. The second half of a general 
course of biochemistry designed for graduate students of biological sciences. The course empha- 
sizes reactions and control of intermediary metabolism. 



Animal and Veterinary Sciences 67 



414. Enzymes. II. 3 HR. PR: AGBI 312 or consent. A survey of enzymology covering general 
principles as well as current concepts and methods. 

415. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. II. 2 HR. PR or Cone: AGBI 312. Experiments in the 
areas of intermediary metabolism and enzymology. 

416. Vitamin and Coenzyme Biochemistry. II. 2 HR. PR: AGBI 312, or BIOL 231, or consent. 
Chemical and physical properties, analysis, biosynthesis, metabolism, pathobiology, pharmacol- 
ogy, and toxicology of vitamins, vitamin-like compounds, and coenzymes. (Offered in spring of 
odd years.) 

422. Plant Biochemistry. I. 3 HR. PR: AGBI 312 or consent. Advanced treatment of the composi- 
tion and metabolism of plants. Topics include cell wall structure, sulfur and nitrogen metabolism, 
and photosynthesis. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

424. Advanced Nutritional Biochemistry. I. 4 HR. PR: AGBI 310 and AGBI 311 and AGBI 312 or 
consent. Advanced treatment of the biochemistry and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates 
and lipids in the diets of ruminants and nonruminants. (Offered in fall of even years.) 

428. Biomembranes and Muscle Biochemistry. II. 3 HR. PR: AGBI 31 2, or BIOC 231 , or consent. 
Chemical, organization, and physiological aspects of membranes and muscles; molecular and 
cellular interactions and integrative mechanisms. 3 HR. lee. (Offered in spring of even years.) 

Animal and Veterinary Science (A&VS) 

201 . Values and Ethics. 3 HR. PR: Senior standing or consent. Current ethical aspects in agriculture 
and forestry and their impact on societal values. 

250. Current Literature in Animal Science. I. 3 HR. PR: ANNU 101. Evaluation of current research in 
animal science; its application to production and management. Note: Previously listed as ANPR 250. 

420. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 HR. (1 HR. credit in special cases only.) Advanced study in 
particular phases of such animal science topics as animal production, nutrition, physiology, 
breeding and genetics, veterinary science, and food. (For the master's degree, special topics 
ordinarily may count 2 to 4 HR.; max. credit, 6 HR.) 

491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-4 HR. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1 -1 5 HR. Research in animal nutrition, physiology, breeding and production, 
and veterinary science. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 

Animal Nutrition (ANNU) 

301 . Principles of Nutrition and Metabolism. I. 3 HR. PR: AGBI 210 or consent. A basic course in 
principles of nutrition with emphasis on the major classes of dietary nutrients and their digestion 
and utilization. 

302. Nutrition and Physiological Function. II. 3 HR. PR: ANNU 301 or consent. Sequence to 
ANNU 301 . Techniques used in nutritional studies and the relationship of nutrient requirements to 
physiological function in species of laboratory and domestic animals and man. 

430. Rumen Metabolism and Physiology. I. 3 HR. PR: Course in biochemistry. The anatomy and 
physiology of the forestomachs of ruminants and the rumen microbial population. Emphasis on 
the microbial metabolism as it pertains to the utilization of feeds by ruminants. (Offered in fall of 
odd years.) 

432. Forage Chemistry and Quality 3 HR. PR: ANNU 301 and AGRN 254, or consent. Advanced 
course in chemistry and biochemistry of pastures and forages, emphasizing factors affecting their 
quality and principles governing their utilization by herbivorous animals. (Also listed as AGRN 
432.) (Offered in spring of even years.) 



68 WVU Graduate Catalog 



434. Mineral Nutrition of Animals. II. 3 HR. PR: ANNU 301 or consent. Mineral nutrition of live- 
stock and man; soil-plant-animal interactions. Detailed treatment of function of individual ele- 
ments and their involvement in deficiency and toxicity conditions on an international basis. 
(Offered in spring of odd years.) 

450. Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491 . Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1 -6 HR. (Repeat registration permitted for maximum of six credit 
hours per year.) Topics in advanced nutrition. Subject will be selected by staff for formal 

presentation. 

Animal Physiology (ANPH) 

200. Growth and Lactation Physiology. II. 3 HR. PR: ANPH 100, or consent. Animal life cycles; 
nature of growth and lactation; effects of biological, environmental, and social-psychological vari- 
ants; physiological regulation and control. 

204. Animal Physiology Laboratory. I. 2 HR. PR: ANPH 100 or consent. Laboratory study of the 
physiological systems of animals and the influences of environment on these 
systems. 4 HR. lab. 

225. Physiology of Reproduction. II. 3 HR. PR: Course in biology. Comparative physiology of repro- 
duction in higher animals; endocrine functions involved in reproduction; genetic and environmental 
variations in fertility mechanisms. 

226. Breeding of Farm Animals. 3 HR. PR: Course in genetics or consent. Application of principles 
of quantitative genetics to the improvement of farm animals. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

280. Behavioral Patterns of Animals. 3 HR. Examination of the bases for exhibition and control of 
behavioral patterns of domesticated and nondomesticated species. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. (Offered 
in spring of even years.) 

425. Endocrinology of Reproduction. II. 4 HR. (2 labs) PR: ANPH 225 or BIOL 268 or equivalent. 
Discussion of and laboratory experience in classical and current concepts of hormonal and neuro- 
hormonal regulations of reproductive phenomena with emphasis on species differences and simi- 
larities. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

426. Advanced Animal Selection. II. 3 HR. PR: Course in statistics and course in genetics or equiva- 
lent. An advanced course dealing with the basic concepts of experimental and statistical approaches 
in the analysis of quantitative inheritance with special reference to the magnitude and nature of 
genotypic and nongenotypic variability. (Offered in spring of even years.) 

450. Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. 

Animal Production (ANPR) 

422. Advanced Milk Production. II. 3 HR. PR: ANNU 101 or consent. Advanced study of the feeding, 
breeding, and management of dairy cattle. 

Food Science (FDSC) 

267. Advanced Meat Science. 3 HR. PR: FDSC 167. Theoretical and experimental aspects of meat 
science, meat product/process systems, and the quantitative biology of muscle systems used for 
food. (Offered in spring of even years.) 

Veterinary Science (VETS) 

205. Parasitology. II. 3 HR. PR: Course in biology or consent. Common parasites of farm animals, 
their life cycles, effects on the host, diagnosis, control, and public health importance. 3 HR. lee, 1 
HR. lab. (Offered in fall of even years.) 

210. Principles of Laboratory Animal Science. 3 HR. PR: Consent for undergraduates. The produc- 
tion, genetics, physiology, nutrition, disease, and regulations of laboratory animals use in research 
and teaching. This course meets minimal requirements for laboratory animal technical certification 
programs of the American Association of Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS). (Offered in fall of even 
years.) 

Animal and Veterinary Sciences 69 



Family and Consumer Sciences 

Janice I. Yeager, Director, Division of Family and Consumer Sciences 

Wanda Franz, Graduate Program Coordinator 

702 Allen Hall 

Degree Offered: Master of Science 

The graduate program in the Division of Family and Consumer Sciences provides 
students the opportunity to study for a master of science degree. Two areas of emphasis 
are offered: (1) child development/family studies; (2) human nutrition. 

Students should have completed an undergraduate curriculum in the area of special- 
ization for which they seek admission. A student whose undergraduate degree is in a 
different field will ordinarily be required to take supplemental undergraduate courses. 

The child development/family studies emphasis is structured to give students a basis 
from which to conduct research and to work with families and children in educational and 
clinical settings. In addition, the program prepares students for entering Ph.D. programs 
in child development and family studies, family life education, psychology, or counseling. 

Courses in child development and parenting strategies are supplemented with field 
experience in a variety of settings, such as the West Virginia University Child Develop- 
ment Laboratory, the Ruby Memorial Hospital neonatal intensive care and pediatric units, 
the W.G. Klingberg Center for Child Development, Stepping Stones, and parenting edu- 
cation programs in the community. 

Individuals choosing an emphasis in child development and family studies may select 
from a wide variety of careers which include employment as child care specialists, early 
childhood teachers, developmental specialists, child life educators, parent educators, 
and extension specialists. 

Human Nutrition 

The human nutrition program offers students a variety of opportunities in clinical and 
applied nutrition. Admission as a regular graduate student requires that the student has 
had a oasic nutrition course in the past five years and have completed organic chemistry. 
Students can apply to be enrolled concurrently in the developmentally accredited dietetic 
internship program, to become eligible to take the registration examination for the dietet- 
ics profession. The number of people who can be accepted into the internship program is 
limited. In addition, the program prepares students for entering doctoral programs in 
nutrition, education, and nutritional biochemistry. 

A variety of research opportunities with the human nutrition and foods faculty is of- 
fered to students as collaborative opportunities are available with the WVU Health 
Sciences Center, the Gerontology Center, the exercise physiology program, and with the 
West Virginia child nutrition programs. 

Background courses in nutrition, foods, general and organic chemistry, and the bio- 
logical sciences are helpful to students selecting the human nutrition area for specializa- 
tion. Graduates may select from a wide variety of careers, which include employment in 
hospitals, clinics, industrial and institutional food service organizations, fitness centers, 
and government-supported health programs. 



70 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Thesis or Research Report 

Students pursuing a master of science degree in family and consumer sciences have 
a choice of two options: thesis or research report. The thesis option requires a minimum 
of 39 hours of course work, which includes six hours of research credit. The creative/ 
scholarly problem option requires a minimum of 39 hours of course work , which includes 
three hours credit for a research project. For further information, contact the Graduate 
Program Coordinator, Division of Family and Consumer Sciences, 702 Allen Hall, P.O. 
Box 6124, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6124; (304) 293-3402. 

Child Development and Family Studies (CDFS) 

211 . Middle Childhood-Early Adolescent Development. 3 HR. PR: CD&FS 10. Analysis and inves- 
tigation of developmental factors in middle childhood-early adolescence. Consideration and diag- 
nosis of physical, emotional, social, familial, moral, and intellectual interactions affecting the child, 
age 6-14. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

212. Adolescent Development. II. 3 HR. PR: CDFS 10. Adolescent in contemporary American 
culture, including normative physical, social, and personality development; relationships within 
various typical social settings, (e.g., family, school, community, peer group.) 

213. Contemporary Issues in Family Relations. II. 3 HR. PR: Senior or graduate standing or 
consent. Study of recent research findings in the major areas of family relationships. Topics in- 
clude effects of family violence, substance abuse, poverty, and health. 

215. Family Interaction and Communication. II. 3 HR. PR: Senior or graduate standing or consent. 
The family as a social group; processes related to well-being for a variety of family relationships. 

216. Child Development Practicum. I, II. 3-4 HR. Application of child development principles. 
Involves planning developmental^ appropriate activities for 3, 4, and 5 year-old children at the 
West Virginia University Child Development Laboratory. 

217. Hospital Child Life Practicum. I, II. 3 HR. PR: CDFS 112 and CDFS 194 and CDFS 216. 
Application of development principles to children in the hospital. Assignments involve learning 
intervention techniques to minimize hospital-generated stress and enhance normal development 
and family experiences. 

340. Survey of Family Studies. I. 3 HR. A comprehensive overview of the theoretical and empirical 
literature focusing on the family. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

341. Cognitive Development of the Child. II. 3 HR. Piaget's basic theory, including his view of 
perceptual, symbolic, motor and logical-mathematical development, across the life span. 

343. Language Development in the Child. I. 3 HR. Investigation of the origins and acquisitions of 
language in children with an emphasis on research and the theoretical issues that explain lan- 
guage as part of mens general cognitive functioning. (Offered in fall of even years.) 

345. Socio-Emotional Development of the Child. I. 3 HR. A study and examination of contempo- 
rary theory and research into various facets of the socialization process in infancy and childhood. 
(Offered in fall of odd years.) 

347. Comparative Study of the Family. I. 3 HR. The comparative method as a framework for family 
analysis. An examination of family diversity and multiculturalism in an ever-changing U.S. society. 
(Offered in fall of even years.) 

348. Theories of Child Development. II. 3 HR. Examination of major theoretical conceptions of 
child development. Work of Werner, Piaget, Freud, Erikson, and the American learning theorists 
compared and contrasted. (Offered in fall of even years.) 

349. Seminar Family Therapy. 3 HR. 



Family and Consumer Sciences 71 



Family Resources (FAMR) 

281. Issues in Consumer Sciences. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Senior standing or consent. Examines the 
process of socialization for the professional role within the context of social change and current 
trends affecting families in the U.S. and overseas. 

373. Professional Development. 1-6 HR. 

390. Research Methods in Family Resources. II. 3 HR. PR: Introductory statistics or written con- 
sent. Research methodology, experimental design, and statistical analysis as relevant to prob- 
lems in family resources. 

391. Advanced Topics. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. 
394. Practicum/lnternship. 1-6 HR. 

396. Graduate Seminar. I, II, S. 1-4 HR. PR: Consent of graduate advisor. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

Home Economics Education (HEED) 

219. Occupational Home Economics. II. 3 HR. Prepares teachers to implement occupational home 
economics programs. Emphasis on organizing and administering programs, developing labora- 
tory and work experiences, recruiting students, and evaluating progress. 

278. Vocational Home Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: Senior standing. Develops an understanding of 
federal vocational legislation to enable an individual to develop and implement programs in voca- 
tional education. 

Human Nutrition and Foods (HN&F) 

260. Advanced Nutrition. I. 3 HR. PR: HN&F 71, physiology. Coreq.: Biochemistry. Role of nutri- 
ents in physiological and biochemical processes and metabolism in the body. Biochemical foun- 
dations of RDA and clinical nutrition. 

261 . Nutrition Laboratory Experimentation. I. 2 HR. Coreq.: HN&F 260 or consent. Nutrient analy- 
sis and introduction to nutrition experimentation; nutritional assessment. 

272. Community Nutrition. I. (Even years). 3 HR. PR: HN&F 71. Beginning planning for commu- 
nity nutrition to individuals and families at various stages of the life cycle. Roles of concerned 
agencies and professional groups. Clinical experience in community facilities. 

274. Nutrition in Disease. II. 4 HR. PR: HN&F 71 ; physiology or consent. Nutritional care aspects 
of patients. Modification of diet to meet human nutrition needs in various medical conditions. 

370. Human Nutrition Concepts and Application. II. 3 HR. PR: HN&F 260 or equiv., and consent. 
Critical study of the nutrient evaluation methods and the nutrient requirements of the human in 
health and disease, and scope of its application. (Offered spring of even years.) 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

Textiles and Clothing (TXCL) 

222. Fashion Merchandising. I. 3 HR. PR: Senior standing. Study of merchandising activities 
performed on the retail level including planning sales and assortments, selecting merchandise for 
resale, controlling inventories, and determining profit. Basic mathematical formulas involved in 
merchandising are practiced. 

224. Flat Pattern Design. II. 3 HR. PR: TXCL 27, and TXCL 124 and TXCL 126 or consent. Oppor- 
tunity for creative expression and for understanding of pattern design through the flat pattern. 
Apparel designed and constructed by the student. 



72 WVU Graduate Catalog 



226. Apparel Design and Illustration. II. 3 HR. PR: TXCL 224 or consent. Techniques of drawing 
using a live fashion model and various media for apparel design presentation. Sources of design 
inspiration examined for developing original apparel designs. Art principles and fashion terminol- 
ogy explored. 

227. Textiles in the Global Economy. I. (Even years). 3 HR. PR: TXCL 27. Explores economic, 
political and social dimensions of the international production and trade of textiles and apparel. 
Emphasis is on U.S. textile complex within an international perspective. 

228. Functional Apparel. I. 3 HR. PR: ENGL 1 and ENGL 2, and TXCL 224. Physical, psychologi- 
cal, and sociological clothing needs of individuals with functional limitations. Historical develop- 
ments, current research, and research needs. Each student conducts a community-based project. 

229. Merchandising Study Tour. 11.1 HR. PR: Junior or Senior standing in Textiles, Apparel and 
Fashion Merchandising. Study of the textile, apparel and retail industries through on-site visits to 
historic costume collections, apparel manufacturing firms, design showrooms, buying offices, and 
retail establishments. Readings including. 



Forestry 

Joseph McNeel, Director, Division of Forestry 

322-A Percival Hall 

Degrees Offered: Doctor of Philosophy in Forest Resource Science, 

Master of Science in: Recreation and Parks Management, Wildlife and Fisheries 

Management, Forestry. 

A student seeking admission to work toward the degree of doctor of philosophy in 
forest resources science in the College of Agriculture and Forestry may choose as the 
major field of study forest science, wood science, or wildlife and fisheries management. 
Within these major fields of study, specialization is limited only by the range of compe- 
tencies in the graduate faculty. 

Curriculum Requirements 

Curriculum requirements for all candidates include a block of graduate courses in the 
major field, which will constitute a comprehensive review of the significant knowledge in 
that field, and a block of graduate courses in a minor field of study. A minimum of 60 semes- 
ter hours beyond the bachelor's degree and exclusive of the dissertation is required. 

Dissertation and Final Examination 

The research work for the doctoral dissertation must show a high degree of scholarship 
and must present an original contribution to the field of forest resources science. In addition 
to course work and the dissertation, the candidate is required to pass a qualifying examina- 
tion and a final examination. 

Admission Requirements-Master's Degree Programs 

Admission requirements are those of the College of Agriculture and Forestry. Addition- 
ally, students seeking admission for the degree of master of science in forestry (M.S.F.) 
should have completed an undergraduate curriculum in forestry. A student whose under- 
graduate degree is in a field other than forestry will ordinarily be required to take supple- 
mental undergraduate courses. Candidates for the degree may major in forest biometry, 
forest ecology, forest economics, forest genetics, forest management, forest meteorol- 
ogy, silviculture, or wood industry. The candidate must complete 30 hours of approved 
study, six hours of which shall constitute a thesis. The program ordinarily requires two 
years of residence. 



Forestry 73 



The Division of Forestry of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Consumer 
Sciences offers program options leading to the master of science for students who wish 
to major in recreation and parks management. Students selecting this graduate program 
may emphasize recreation administration and policy, environmental education and 
interpretation, and recreation planning and resource management. Degree require- 
ments are either 30 semester hours of approved study, including a six credit-hour thesis, 
or 36 semester hours without a thesis but including a three credit-hour problem paper. 
This program ordinarily requires two years of residence. 

Graduate studies in wildlife and fisheries management in the Division of Forestry lead 
to the master of science (M.S.) degree. Students may elect either 30 semester hours of 
approved study, including a six hour thesis or 36 hours of approved study without a thesis 
but including a three hour problem paper. 

Forestry (FOR) 

220. Forest Policy and Administration. I and II. 3 HR. PR: Upperclass forestry major or consent. 
Forest policy in the United States; important federal and state laws; administration of public and 
private forests; problems in multiple-use forestry. 

225. Global Forest Resources. II. 3 HR. Significance of renewable natural resources on a global 
scale and the ecological, economic, and social contexts in which they are managed. Emphasis is 
on world forest resources, including timber, wildlife, and social uses. 

226. Remote Sensing of Environment. II. 2 HR. PR: MATH 3, and MATH 4. Measurement and 
interpretation of natural resources and environment from photography, radar, infrared, and micro- 
wave imagery. 

310. Biometeorology. II. 4 HR. PR: Consent. A description of the physical environment of plants 
and its effect on growth, its modification for increasing yield and for plant protection against ex- 
treme atmospheric conditions. 

470. Special Topics in Forestry, Wood Science, Wildlife or Recreation. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. 

480. Principles of Research. I. 2 HR. The specific method as applied in the formal, concrete, and 
normative sciences; special emphasis on forestry-related research plans and reports. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practices in college teaching of 
forest resources management, wood science, wildlife management resources, and recreation 
and parks. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced subjects which are 
not covered in regularly scheduled classes. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. I, II, S. 2-4 HR. PR: Consent. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking 
course work credit but who wish to meet resident requirements, use the University's facilities, and 
participate in its academic and cultural programs. 

Forest Hydrology (FHYD) 

244. Watershed Management. II. 3 HR. PR: FMAN 12, and FMAN 211. (Primarily for forest man- 
agement majors.) Influences of silvicultural practices and forest management activities on the 
hydrology of forested catchments. 

Forest Management (FMAN) 

200. Forest Resources Management Field Practice. S. 5 HR. PR: FOR 5, and CE 5, and FMAN 
122. (Course will be taught during four consecutive 6-day weeks.) Application and study of forest 
management practices with emphasis on field problems. 



74 WVU Graduate Catalog 



201. Forest Resources Management Field Trip. S. 1 HR. PR: FMAN 200 or consent. One-week 
trip to observe forest managements practices on private and public lands outside the Appalachian 
hardwoods region. 

211. Silvicultural Systems. I. 4 HR. PR: FOR 5, and FMAN 12, and FMAN 122, or FOR 5 and 
WMAN 213. The theory and practice of controlling forest stand establishment, composition, struc- 
ture, and growth. Systems include: reproduction methods, release operations, and intermediate 
treatments. 

213. Regional Silviculture. I. 2 HR. PR: Forestry major or consent, FMAN 12; PR or Cone: FMAN 
211 . Major forest types of the United State: their composition, management, problems, and silvi- 
cultural treatment. 

216. Forest Genetics and Tree Improvement. II. 3 HR. PR: Forestry major or consent; GEN 272, 
or equiv., or consent. Forest genetic principles and their application to forest tree improvement, 
including crossing methods, selection systems, and other techniques. 

222. Advanced Forest Mensuration. II. 3 HR. PR: Forestry major or consent; FMAN 122. Mea- 
surement of growth and yield; statistical methods applied to forest measurement problems. 

230. Principles of Forestry Economics. II. 4 HR. PR: ECON 54 or ARE 50 and ECON 55. Produc- 
tion, distribution and use of forest goods and services. Emphasis on analytical methods and prob- 
lem solving techniques in the economic aspects of forestry. 

233. Forest Management. I. 3 HR. PR: FMAN 200, and FMAN 211, and FMAN 230. Principles of 
sustained yield forest management: organization of forest areas, selection of management objec- 
tives, application of silvicultural systems, and regulation of cut. Principles of sustainable forestry 
and ecosystem management. 

234. Forest Resources Management Planning. II. 3 HR. PR: Senior standing in the Division of 
Forestry. Integrated planning of long-term management of forest resources. Development of a 
management plan for an actual forest tract. Emphasis on biological, social, economic and ethical 
considerations in decision-making. 

330. Advanced Principles of Forestry Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 or ARE 50 and ECON 
55 and FMAN 230. Intensive study of both micro-and macroeconomics of forestry. 

340. Current Issues in Forest Management. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Analysis of environmental 
issues in forest management and current controversies surrounding the management of forested 
lands. Emphasis on traditional and ecosystem-based forest management policy, philosophy, and 
practices. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

411. Advanced Forest Ecology. I. 3 HR. PR: FMAN 12 or equivalent; FMAN 211. Ecological rela- 
tionships in forests with emphasis on biogeochemical cycles. 

412. Silvicultural Practices for Hardwood Forest Types II. 3 HR. PR: FMAN 211 . Designing proper 
silvicultural systems for managing Appalachian hardwood stands; reconstructing stand histories, 
recognizing problems, and prescribing appropriate silvicultural treatment. 

Recreation & Parks Management (RCPK) 

216. Philosophy of Recreation. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Interpretation of recreation as a basic part 
of the living process; importance to individual community and national welfare; social and eco- 
nomic significance. 

233. Wildland Recreation Management. I. 3 HR. PR: FMAN 12 or consent. Topics include an 
analysis of administrative agencies concerned with wildland management; methods of ameliorat- 
ing human impact on outdoor recreation resources; discussion of philosophies underlying wilder- 
ness recreation; and a review of contemporary controversies concerning wildlands. 

234. Wilderness in American Society. II. 3 HR. PR: RCPK 233 or consent. A seminar examining 
political, sociological, and environmental aspects of American wilderness. A discussion on ar- 
ticles concerning wilderness preservation, management, and aesthetics. 



Forestry 75 



235. Parks and Recreation Administration. I. 3 HR. PR: 12 HR. of recreation and parks courses, 
junior standing, or consent. Principles of administration as applied to the operation of recreation 
and park agencies, including legal foundations, policy, organization, personnel, finance, and pro- 
grams of service. 

239. Natural Resource Tourism. I. 3 HR. PR: Junior standing. Tourism in natural settings; empha- 
sis on sustainable tourism development and natural resource stewardship. (Field trip required; 
some transportation costs.) 

242. Historical and Cultural Interpretation. II. 3 HR. PR: Recreation and parks major or consent. 
Methods of locating source materials for reconstructing the historical, cultural, and physical as- 
pects of an area for an interpretive center; preparing brochures, displays, and nature trails to 
facilitate interpretive activities. 

333. Natural Resources Recreation Management. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Study of governmental 
and private sector organizations involved in the delivery of natural resource-based recreational 
opportunities: examination of management systems; review of current issues and controversies. 
(Some travel costs may be incurred.) 

338. Tourism Planning. !. 3 HR. Use of natural settings; integreation of tourism development with 
respect to environmental protection concerns. (Field trip required; some transportation and food 
costs.) 

391 . Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

408. Recreation and Park Management Practicum. 2-4 HR. PR: Consent. Field experience and 
conference in the study, analysis, and solution of management problems in private, commercial 
and governmental recreation and park organizations. 

41 5. Leisure and Recreation. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Study of leisure as a social phenomenon and 
its implications for recreation. 

421. Recreation Planning: Human Interest Areas. 3 HR. Exploration of human interest areas as 
sources of recreation program content; the nature, factors, and extent of participation; and their 
structuring and administration through work program planning. (Offered in fall of even years.) 

472. Seminar in Recreation. I, II. 1-3 HR. (Repeatable up to 6 HR. credit.) Overview and critical 
analysis of literature in recreation interpretation, environmental concerns, or leisure studies. 

Wildlife and Fisheries Management (WMAN) 

213. Wildlife Ecosystem Ecology. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 15 and BIOL 17, and FOR 5 or consent. Basic 
principles of ecosystem ecology, emphasizing structure and function, succession, adaptation of 
organisms to the environment (physiological ecology), and survey of major ecosystems with em- 
phasis on their roles as wildlife habitats. 

214. Wildlife Population Ecology. II. 3 HR. PR: WMAN 213 or consent. Emphasis on theoretical 
and applied population ecology including population growth, interactions, regulation, and effects 
of harvesting and exploitation on natural populations. 2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab. 

221 . Interpretive Bird Study. II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 17 or consent. Intensive field studies in recogni- 
tion through sight, song, and behavioral patterns of birds, and their ecology in the Central 
Appalachians. 2 HR. lee, 2 HR. lab. 

224. Vertebrate Natural History. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 17 or consent. Relationships of fish, amphib- 
ians, and reptiles to the forest, with emphasis on the ecology, taxonomy, evolution, natural history, 
and field identification of these groups. Laboratory emphasizes natural history and anatomy of 
fish, amphibians, and reptiles. 

225. Mammalogy. II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 17 or consent. Mammals and their biological properties with 
emphasis on life history, ecology, and distribution of regional forms. (Also listed as BIOL 258.) 

226. Ornithology. II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 15 and 17, or consent. Identification, distribution, and ecol- 
ogy of birds (particularly of forest lands.) (2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab.) 

76 WVU Graduate Catalog 



228. Wildlife Policy and Administration. II. 3 HR. Study of the organization, authority, policies, 
programs, and administration of public agencies and private organizations concerned with fish 
and wildlife. Emphasis is in the legal and political role in making wildlife management decisions. 

231 . Wildlife Habitat Techniques. I. 3 HR. PR: Wildlife major or consent; WMAN 213, FOR 5. Field 
and laboratory techniques necessary in management and study of wildlife; collection of field data, 
mapping, censusing, habitat evaluation, wetland delineation, use of literature and scientific 
writing. 

234. Principles of Wildlife Animal Damage Control. II. 3 HR. PR: Wildlife major or consent: WMAN 
213, 231. Basic principles of controlling wildlife damage to agricultural crops, forest resources, 
human lives, and human property. Includes methods of identifying damage caused by various 
wildlife species. 

240. Principles of Wildlife Toxicology. I. (Alternate years). 3 HR. PR: WMAN 213, CHEM 16. 
Survey of toxicological environmental contamination. Ancillary topics include oil, metals, pesti- 
cide impacts; legislative mandates; vertebrate sampling procedures and risk assessment. 

245. Introduction to Fisheries Management. II. 3 HR. PR: WMAN 224 or consent. Basic principles 
of management of fishery resources, with an emphasis on freshwater stocks. Includes current 
environmental and management issues, concepts, and methods used in management of com- 
mercial and recreational fisheries. 

250. Pollution and Management of Aquatic Ecosystems. II. 3 HR. PR: Junior standing. Biological 
and ecological effects of water pollution and loss of freshwater resources. Topics include effects 
of effluents, water diversion, and land use practices on aquatic resources in lake, river, and wet- 
land environments, mitigation and management techniques, and regulatory structures. 

280. Wildlife/Fisheries Field Tech. I, S. 3 HR. PR: Jr or Sr standing. Survey of methods and techniques 
frequently used in the field by wildlife and fisheries managers. Class is taught off-campus. 

312. Advanced Wildlife Population Ecology. II. 3 HR. PR: WMAN 214 or equivalent, or consent. 
Case history approach to wildlife population ecology with emphasis on ungulates, gallinaceous 
birds, large predators; forest invertebrates and their vertebrate predators; endangered species; 
genetics and conservation of wildlife populations. Emphasis on current and historical literature. (3 
HR. lee.) 

333. Quantitative Ecology. I. 3 HR. PR: STAT 311 or equivalent, and WMAN 213 or equivalent. A 
survey of techniques and strategies for the quantitative analysis of complex ecological data sets. 
(Offered in fall of odd years.) 

370. Wildlife Seminar. II. 1 HR. per semester; (4 HR. max.) PR: Consent. Discussion of current 
developments in wildlife management. 

380. Rural and Urban Wildlife Management. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Management of nongame 
wildlife in the rural and urban environment, emphasizing habitat improvement and development 
and control of pest species. 2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

434. Ecology and Management of Upland Wildlife. I. 4 HR. PR: Consent. Ecology and manage- 
ment of upland game birds and mammals with emphasis on recent literature. (Offered in fall of 
even years.) 

436. Ecology and Management of Wetland Wildlife. II. 4 HR. PR: Consent. Ecology and manage- 
ment of waterfowl and wetland furbears with emphasis on recent research and management 
literature. (Offered in spring of even years.) 

Wood Science (WDSC) 

200. Forest Measurement Field Practice. S. 3 HR. PR: Wood Industry major, FOR 5, CE 1 , FMAN 
122. Application of surveying and mensurational practices with emphasis on field problems. 

201 . Wood Industries Field Trip. S. 1 HR. A one-week trip to observe manufacturing methods and 
techniques of commercial wood industry plants. Plants visited include furniture, plywood, veneer, 
hardboard, pulp and paper, sawmilling, and preservation. 



Forestry 77 



213. Wood Chemistry. I. 3 HR. PR: Wood Industry major or consent, and CHEM 131 or CHEM 
133. Chemical composition of wood including cellulose, hemicellulose, and extractives. Chemical 
processing of wood. 

222. Harvesting Forest Products. 3 HR. PR: MATH 4 or equivalent and WDSC 132. Analysis of 
ground-based and cable harvesting systems, including time and motion studies, productivity and 
cost analysis, occupational safety and health, environmental issues, equipment evaluation and 
selection, and trucking of forest products. (2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab.) 

223. Forest Roads. 4 HR. PR: CE 5, CS 5. Techniques of design, layout, and construction details 
of various standards of forest roads. (2 HR. lee, 2 HR. lab.) 

230. Wood Machining. I. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Introduction to basic concepts of wood machining 
with emphasis on production equipment and furniture manufacturing. 

234. Statistical Quality Control. I. 3 HR. PR: Forestry major or consent. Methods used to control 
quality of manufactured wood products. Control charts of variables and attributes. Acceptance 
sampling techniques. 

235. Light-Frame Wood Construction. I. 2 HR. PR: Forestry major or consent. Use of wood in 
light-frame construction. Basic design procedures and construction methods. 

237. Wood Adhesion and Finishing. II. 3 HR. PR: Wood Industry major or consent; WDSC 123 
and WDSC 141. Fundamentals of the bonding and finishing of wood including preparation, pro- 
cessing, and evaluation of adhesive and finishing systems. 

240. Physical Behavior of Wood. II. 3 HR. PR: WDSC 123, and PHYS 1 , and MATH 4. Specific 
gravity and density of wood; relationships between wood and liquids and applications in wood 
seasoning; thermal, electrical, and acoustical properties. 

241 . Wood Mechanics. 3 HR. PR: Wood industry major or consent; WDSC 123, and MATH 15, and 
PHYS 1 . Introduction to static properties of selections, elementary mechanics of deformable bodies, 
axial loading, column and beam analysis, and design considerations. (2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab.) 

251. Forest Products Protection. II. 3 HR. PR: WDSC 123. Biological organisms responsible for 
deterioration of wood products, their control by preservative methods, and study of fire retarding 
methods. 

260. Plant Layout for Wood Industries. II. 3 HR. PR: Senior standing. Relates knowledge of wood 
product processes to optimize production. Study of proper arrangement of machines, and work 
and storage areas. 

262. Forest Products Decision-Making. I. 3 HR. PR: Junior standing in Forestry. Decision-making 
tools and techniques used by the forest products industry such as simulation-linear programming, 
network analysis, forecasting, game theory. 

265. Wood-based Composite Materials. 3 HR. PR: WDSC 1 32, and WDSC 240, and WDSC 241 . 
Fundamentals of manufacturing wood-based composite materials, including processing, prod- 
ucts, evaluation, and applications in the marketplace. (2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab.) 

320. Wood Microstructure. I. 3 HR. PR: WDSC 123; senior standing. Detailed examination of 
wood microstructure as it relates to processing, behavior, and identification. 

340. Advanced Physical Behavior of Wood. I. 3 HR. PR: WDSC 240 or equivalent or consent. 
Physical relationships of water and wood; fluid flow through wood; thermal, electrical, and acous- 
tical behavior of wood. Theories of wood drying and their application. 

362. Forest Products Operations Research Models. II. 3 HR. PR: WDSC 262 and demonstrated 
knowledge of Fortran and Basic, or consent. Analysis of operations research models currently 
used by the forest products industry. Students will develop new models. (Offered in spring of even 
years.) 

473. Seminar in Wood Utilization. II. 1-4 HR. per semester; max. credit, 4 HR. PR: Consent. Reports 
and discussions of recent research in fundamental and applied phases of wood utilization. 



78 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Genetics and Developmental Biology 

Joginder Nath, Chairperson of the Interdisciplinary Faculty 

1 120 Agricultural Sciences Building 

Degrees Offered: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy 

Areas of Emphasis 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in genetics and 
developmental biology, an interdisciplinary program involving the faculty and facilities of 
a number of departments in the various colleges and schools of the University. A student 
may concentrate in genetics or developmental biology. The areas in which emphases 
are offered are as follows: 

Genetics— Biochemical and molecular genetics, cytogenetics, developmental genet- 
ics, immunogenetics, mutagenesis, toxicology, human genetics, plant genetics, population 
and quantitative genetics, and animal breeding; 

Developmental Biology— Molecular aspects of development, experimental morpho- 
genesis, teratology, regeneration, oncology, descriptive embryology, and life cycles of 
animals and plants. 

The student may also minor in one or more other scientific fields. 

Requirements 

Students are expected to maintain at least a 3.0 (B) average in all work offered in 
fulfillment of the degree program. For a more complete statement of requirements, the 
student is referred to the program's Guidelines for Graduate Students in the Genetics 
and Developmental Biology Program. 

Program Objective 

The objective of this program is an increased level of understanding of modern 
concepts and methodologies employed in genetic and developmental biological work 
and to prepare a student to pursue a career in teaching and/or research. Responsibility 
for a student's program is vested in a graduate committee charged with arranging the 
student's course work, conducting examinations, and supervising the research. 

Admission 

To be considered for admission in the program the student must possess a baccalau- 
reate degree from an accredited college or university, must have a grade-point average 
of at least a 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale), or an average of 3.0 or higher for the last 60 credit 
hours or an average of 3.0 or higher in all courses in sciences and mathematics. 

GRE and New MCAT 

The student must submit the scores of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), or the 
New Medical College Admission Test (New MCAT). The student must provide three letters 
of reference from persons acquainted with the applicants' professional work, experiences, 
or academic work, and submit a written statement of 500 words or more indicating the 
applicants' goals and objectives relative to receiving a graduate degree. 

Basic training in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology is required for admis- 
sion. Students lacking prerequisites may be accepted in a provisional status but must 
fulfill them before graduation. Applications for graduate study should be sent in as early 



Genetics and Developmental Biology 79 



in the year as possible, but not later than April 1 for entry the following August. How- 
ever, applications are accepted year-round for admission to the program in the follow- 
ing semester. Official transcripts of baccalaureate and/or master's degrees must be 
sent directly to the WVU Office of Admissions and Records. Application forms can be 
received from the WVU Office of Admissions and Records, P.O. Box 6009, Morgan- 
town, WV 26506-6009. For further information, write to the chair. 

Developmental Biology 

The following courses in the Departments of Anatomy, Biochemistry, and Biology may 
be applied toward the requirements for a major in developmental biology: Anatomy 402 
Advanced Developmental Anatomy, 405 Experimental Embryology, Biochemistry 491 
Advanced Study in Nucleic Acids, Biology 214 Molecular Basis of Cellular Growth, 
Biology 309 Molecular Biology of the Gene, Biology 362 Developmental Biology, and 
Biology 364 Advanced Plant Physiology. 

Genetics (GEN) 

290. Crop Breeding. II. 3 HR. PR: GEN 171 or GEN 321. Methods and basic scientific principles 
involved in improvement of leading crops through hybridization, selection, and other techniques. 
(Offered in spring of even years.) 

321. Basic Concepts of Modern Genetics. I. 3 HR. PR: 8 HR. Biological sciences and 1 year 
chemistry. Independent inheritance, linkage. Chemical nature of genetic material. Control of phe- 
notype by genetic material. Gene action and coding of genetic material. 

325. Human Genetics. II. 3 HR. PR: GEN 171 or GEN 321 or consent. Study of genetic system 
responsible for development of phenotype in man. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

335. Population Genetics. II. 3 HR. PR: GEN 171 or GEN 321 or consent. Relationship of gene 
and genotype frequencies in populations of diploid organisms, and the effects of mutation, selec- 
tion, assertive mating, and inbreeding in relation to single gene pairs. Application of these con- 
cepts to multigenic inheritance of quantitative traits. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

370. Medical Genetics. II. 2-4 HR. PR: Second-year medical student standing; graduate student 
in Genetics and Developmental Biology; others by consent. Introduction to clinical genetics in- 
cluding molecular, biochemical, and cytogenetic aspects of human biology. Application of genetic 
principles to human health and disease. (Also listed as CCMD 370, MED 370, PEDI 370.) 

391 . Advanced Topics. I, II, S. Variable 1 -6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not 
covered in regularly scheduled courses. 

424. Cytogenetics. II. 4 HR. PR: GEN 171 or GEN 321, and BIOL 215 or consent. Emphasis on 
macromolecules that carry information of the chromosomes, cell division, and the cytological and 
molecular basis of genetics. Special attention given to visible manifestation of genes, human 
cytogenetics, of genomes and chromosome morphology, and their evolution. (Offered in spring of 
odd years.) 

426. Advanced Biochemical Genetics. II. 3 HR. PR: GEN 171 or GEN 321 and organic chemistry. 
Physiological and biophysical concepts of genetic material. Structure and arrangement of genetic 
units. Nucleic acids as carriers of genetic information. Gene action and amino acid coding. Bio- 
chemical evolution of genetic material. Genetic control mechanismsistry of mutation. (Offered in 
fall of even years.) 

427. Genetic Mechanisms of Evolution. I. 3 HR. PR: GEN 171 or equivalent. Molecular genetic 
mechanisms which result in evolutionary change. Origin of life, origin and organization of genetic 
variability, differentiation of populations, isolation and speciation, role of hybridization and polyp- 
loidy, and origin of man. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

450. Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. per semester. Recent literature pertaining to biochemical, classical, 
human, molecular, and cytological genetics. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 



80 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Natural Resource Economics 

Peter V. Schaeffer, Director, Division of Resource Management 
Gerard D' Souza, Graduate Program Coordinator 
2018 Agricultural Sciences Building 
Degree Offered: Doctor of Philosophy 

The Agricultural and Resource Economics Program in the Division of Resource 
Management offers graduate studies leading to the degree of doctor of philosophy in 
natural resource economics. The doctoral program offers three fields of study: 

• Natural resource and environmental economics, 

• Commodity market analysis modeling and forecasting, and 

• International development. 

Careers for which students completing the program are qualified include those with 
universities, research institutes, industry, and state, national, or international agencies 
concerned with natural resource and environmental issues. 

Admission 

Prospective graduate students initiate application for admission on forms available 
from the University Office of Admissions and Records. The completed form should be 
returned to the Office of Admissions and Records, accompanied by payment of the nonre- 
fundable application fee. An official transcript from all colleges attended during an appli- 
cants undergraduate and graduate studies must be a part of the application for admission. 

Performance Standards 

• An applicant must possess a master's degree and hold a grade-point average of 3.5 
or above (on a 4.0 scale) in postgraduate courses. 

• Scores form the Graduate Record Examination are required. A combined score of 
1600 (verbal, quantitative, and analytical scores) or better is expected form appli- 
cants to the Ph.D. program. 

• Applicants whose native language is not English must have obtained a minimum 
score of 550 on the TOEFL examination. 

• Three letters of recommendation are required. 

• A letter of purpose describing research interests and professional aspirations is 
required. 

Applicants who do not meet all of the requirements above but have special qualifica- 
tions may be admitted if approved by the Graduate Admission Committee, the Division 
Director, and the Graduate Program Coordinator. Such admission will usually be subject 
to conditions, however, such as taking course work to make up for deficiencies. Such 
make-up work will not be counted as part of credit requirements for the degree. 

A limited number of graduate research assistantships are available to highly qualified 
students on a competitive basis. The awards are based on academic merit only. 

Requirements for Research 

After a student is admitted, the program coordinator will appoint a major professor to 
direct his/her research. Doctoral students will conduct research in support of approved 
projects. The student, in consultation with the major professor, will select a graduate commit- 
tee during the second semester of study. The committee will consist of five or more mem- 
bers, the majority of whom must be WVU faculty, with at least one member representing 
a discipline outside the program. Each student and his/her committee will formulate a 
plan of study, which will be filed in the office of the program coordinator. University regu- 
lations concerning committee members require that a majority of the graduate commit- 
tee, including the major professor, must be regular members of the WVU graduate faculty. 

Natural Resource Economics 81 



Core Courses 

Doctoral students must satisfactorily complete a set of core courses in economic theory, 
quantitative methods, and resource analysis before they will be admitted to candidacy for 
the Ph.D. degree. All core courses will be at the 300- or 400-level. Certain course require- 
ments may be waived if the student has received equivalent training in prior course work. 
Additional required course work pertaining to the student's area of specialization will be 
determined by the student's major professor and graduate committee. 

Fields of Study 

There are three fields of study: natural resource and environmental economics; com- 
modity analysis, modeling, and forecasting; and international development. Doctoral stu- 
dents must select two fields subject to approval by the student's major professor and 
graduate committee. The student will be required to successfully complete a minimum of 
three courses at the 300- or 400-level in each field selected. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Oral and written qualifying examinations will be administered by the qualifying examina- 
tion committee before the end of the second year following admission to the program. Upon 
satisfactory completion of the qualifying examinations and core course requirements, 
the student will be eligible for admittance to candidacy for the Ph.D. in natural resource 
economics. 

Completion 

Each candidate for the Ph.D. degree will be expected to meet the following general 
requirements: 

• A minimum of two years in residence, 

• Successful completion of qualifying examinations and examinations in two fields of 
study, 

• A dissertation, and 

• Successful oral defense of the dissertation. 

Although not a requirement, presentation of research results at a meeting of a profes- 
sional society and submission of manuscripts for publication are encouraged. 

Agricultural and Resource Economics (ARE) 

201 . Applied Demand Analysis. II. 3 HR. Consumer demand economics applied to environmental, 
natural resource, and agricultural issues; analysis of factors that influence demand and deter- 
mine prices; special applications to non-market, environmental, and natural resource amenities. 

202. Applied Production Economics. I. 3 HR. Production economics applied to agricultural, envi- 
ronmental, and natural resource issues; production, multiple-product and cost functions, and joint 
production; effects of environmental and natural resource management regulations on the pro- 
duction process. 

206. Agribusiness Planning. I. 3 HR. PR: ARE 104 or consent. Application of economic and man- 
agement principles to agribusiness planning; consideration of risk and uncertainty in agribusiness 
planning; formulation of economic models for determining optimum allocation of resources for 
production processes. 

210. Environmental and Resource Economics. I. 3 HR. PR: ARE 201 and 202; or ECON 211; or 
consent. Economic analysis of natural resource and environmental problems; management of 
renewable and nonrenewable resources and environmental amenities; market failure, externali- 
ties, benefit-cost and risk analysis; property rights and the "taking" issue. 

211. Rural Economic Development. I.3HR. Economic trends, development policies, and analysis 
of rural economies in the United States. Rural diversity, development concepts, rural planning, 
public programs and policies, and community analysis methods. 

82 WVU Graduate Catalog 



220. Agricultural Cooperatives. I. 3 HR. History, principles, organization, management, taxation, 
and legal aspects of agricultural, marketing, supply and service cooperatives in the U.S. Develop- 
ment of non-agricultural cooperatives. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

231. Marketing Agricultural Products. II. 3 HR. Organization, functions, and analysis of the agri- 
cultural marketing system. Food consumption, exports, price analysis, marketing costs, market 
power, commodities futures market, food safety, and government regulations. 

235. Marketing Livestock Products. I. 3 HR. Livestock marketing practices and policies. Supply 
and demand, livestock price cycles, grading, marketing alternatives, processing and retailing. 
Economic analysis of alternatives, current issues and trends. (Offered in fall of even years.) 

240. Futures Markets and Commodity Prices. I. 3 HR. Analysis of price-making forces which 
operate in the market place; emphasis on major agricultural and mineral commodity and futures 
markets. 

245. Energy Economics. II. 3 HR. Analysis of the energy sector and its relationship to the rest of 
the economy; energy security, deregulation, full cost pricing, substitutability among energy sources, 
transmission, new technologies, environmental considerations. 

250. Agricultural, Environmental and Resource Policy. II. 3 HR. PR: ARE 201 , 202; or ECON 211 ; 
or consent. Economic analysis of agricultural, natural resource and environmental policies; prob- 
lems of externalities and market failure, and alternative policies for addressing such problems; 
benefits and costs of alternative policies. 

261. Agribusiness Finance. II. 3 HR. An overview of financial analysis and the application of 
financial principles to small, rural and agricultural businesses. Includes applications of financial 
analysis computer software. 

300. Applied Microeconomics I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 211 and 220 or equiv. Producer and consumer 
economics used in resource, environmental, and agricultural economic analysis. 

321. Quantitative Methods in Resource Economics. I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 220 or equiv. Optimiza- 
tion techniques in economic analysis of natural resources; environmental and agricultural man- 
agement problems; linear, nonlinear and dynamic programming. 

324. Econometric Methods in Resource Economics. I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 226. Application methods 
to natural resource, environmental, and agricultural economic problems; single and simultaneous 
equation models, specification problems, topics in time series, and cross-sectional analysis. 

329. Resource Commodity Markets. II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 325 and 326 or consent. Advanced 
econometric methods of specification, estimation and simulation of domestic and international 
resource markets and industries; time series and forecasting techniques. 

330. Production Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and ARE 321. Developments in producer 
economics applied to natural resource, environmental, and agricultural issues. 

332. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and 321 or equiv. 
Theory and institutions; market failure, externalities and property rights issues; renewable and 
nonrenewable resources, common property, environmental and resource management, and 
intergenerational decisions. 

333. Natural Resource Policy Analysis. I. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and 321 or equiv. Welfare econom- 
ics applied to the analysis and evaluation of natural resource, environmental, agricultural, and 
energy policy issues. 

340. Rural and Regional Development. II. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and 321 . Economic theories and 
quantitative techniques. Problems and goals for rural and regional planning; methods of policy 
analysis for community infrastructure development. 

342. International Agricultural Economic Development. I. 3 HR. Current problems, theories, poli- 
cies, and strategies in planning for agricultural and rural development for increased food produc- 
tion and to improve the well-being of rural people in the developing countries of the world. 



Natural Resource Economics 83 



343. Project Analysis & Evaluation. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Design, analysis, and evaluation of 
development projects; economic and financial aspects of project analysis; risk analysis; prepara- 
tion of feasibility reports. 

344. International Markets and Trade. I. 3 HR. PR: ARE 300 and 321 . Causes and consequences 
of international trade and investment; commodity market structures, commodity price instability 
and international agreements; trade barriers and protection, export promotion, and impacts on 
developing countries. 

365. Mineral Finance. II. 3 HR. Methods, risks, and problems of financing mineral projects. Large 
foreign-project financing, concerns of host governments, multinational mining concerns, and fi- 
nancial institutions. 

380. Energy Industry Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: Graduate standing. Technical production and 
consumption methodologies, environmental concerns, and national and global economics and 
politics in making energy decisions. 

381. Resource Appraisal and Decision Making. II. 3HR. PR: ARE 300 orequiv. Investment analy- 
sis, decision making under risk and uncertainty, and project analysis applied to resource explora- 
tion and utilization; mineral and energy reserve and resource estimation techniques. 

382. Mineral Industry Economics. II. 3 HR. Supply, demand, structure, technology, costs, prices, 
and problems of mineral industries. 

400. Research Methods. II. 1 HR. Research methods in agricultural, environmental and resource 
economics. The application of scientific thinking in developing research proposals and critiquing 
published research. 

403. Advanced Natural Resource Economic Theory. I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and ARE 332. Allo- 
cation and distribution of natural resources in static and dynamic contexts; welfare economics, 
cost-benefit analysis, and optimal control approaches; applications to resource valuation, ex- 
haustion, taxation, and regulation in theory and practice. 

410. Advanced Environmental Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and ARE 332 or consent. 
Theory, efficient environmental design and analysis, modeling of economic and environmental 
systems, evaluation of non-market benefits and costs, and risk assessment. 

446. Energy and Regional Development. II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 355 and ARE 380. Energy in the 
West Virginia economy and selected regions of the United States. 

483. Minerals Technology Assessment. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Methods of studying the effects of 
modifications in technology on the production of utilization of minerals, and the effects on mineral 
demand, supply, substitution and markets. 

484. Oil and Gas Industry Economics. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Geology, engineering, and eco- 
nomic theories of evaluating industry structures and performance. 

485. Economics of the Coal Industry. Supply, demand, structure, production technology, costs, 
prices, and problems of the coal industry. Includes environmental, productivity, and transportation 
issues. 

495. Independent Study. I, II. 1-4 HR. PR: Consent. Faculty-supervised study of topics not avail- 
able through regular course offerings. 

Resource Management (RESM) 

491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. 

496. Graduate Seminar. I, II, S. 1 HR. PR: Consent. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 



84 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Plant and Soil Sciences 

Barton S. Baker, Director, Division of Plant and Soil Sciences and Graduate 

Program Coordinator 
1090 Agricultural Sciences Building 
Degree Offered: Master of Science 

Areas of Emphasis 

The Master of Science degree in Plant and Soil Sciences is offered to students who 
wish to study crops agronomy, entomology, environmental microbiology, horticulture, 
plant pathology, or soil science. 

Program Objective 

The objective of the M.S. in Plant and Soil Sciences is to provide students the 
opportunity to take courses and conduct original, master-level research in their areas of 
specialization. The educational experience obtained through courses and research is 
expected to provide students with the background and expertise to enter doctoral programs 
or professional careers as agronomists, entomologists, microbiologists, horticulturists, and 
plant pathologists. These disciplines are critical to maintain agriculture and forest productiv- 
ity, solve environmental problems and promote economic development in the state. 

Admission and Performance Standards 

In order for a student to be admitted to the program, the following admission criteria 
will be considered. The applicant normally must: 

• Possess a baccalaureate degree, 

• Have a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 (3.0 for acceptance as 
a regular graduate student.), 

• Have an adequate academic aptitude at the graduate level as measured by the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or other tests/evidence, 

• Provide three letters of reference from persons acquainted with the applicant's 
professional work, experience, or academic background, and 

• Submit a written statement of approximately 500 words indicating the applicant's 
goals and objectives relative to receiving a graduate degree. 

International students have the additional requirement to submit a minimum score of 
550 on the TOEFL examination if their native language is not English. Interviews are 
encouraged but not required. 

Students enrolled in the M.S. in Plant and Soil Sciences must complete STAT 31 1 , 
312, ENGL 208 (technical writing), or other comparable course, and three semesters of 
seminar in their area of emphasis. Other class requirements will be determined by the 
student's graduate committee and made a part of the student's plan of study. This degree 
requires a minimum of 30 graduate credit hours, six of which may be research. 

Each student must develop a plan of study, conduct original research and prepare a 
thesis. The plan of study which is to be developed within the first year of study must 
contain the courses to be taken plus an outline of the research to be conducted. The 
thesis must be satisfactorily defended in an oral examination given by the student's 
graduate committee. 

Agronomy (AGRN) 

210. Soil Fertility. I. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 10. Soil properties in relation to fertility and productivity of 
soils; scrutiny of essential plant nutrients; use of fertilizers and lime; evaluation of soil fertility. 

212. So/7 Conservation and Management. I. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 10. Using soil technology to solve 
soil management problems relating to cropping systems. Field diagnosis of soil problems stressed. 
2 lee, 2 lab. 

Plant and Soil Sciences 85 



215. So/7 Survey and Land Use. I. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 1 5 or consent. Identification of morphological 
characteristics and taxonomic units of soil; techniques of writing soil pedon and mapping unit 
descriptions; techniques of preparing soil maps; evaluation of soil for land use planning. (2 HR. 
lee, 3 HR. lab.) (Offered fall of odd years.) 

217. So/7 Genesis and Classification. I. 4 HR. PR: AGRN 15 or consent. Origin and formation of soils; 
principles of soil classification; study of soil pedons and polypedons; influence of soil-forming factors 
and processes. Two Saturday field trips required. (3 HR. lee, 3 hr lab.) (Offered fall of even years.) 

220. Soil Microbiology. I. 3 HR. PR: ENVM 141 . Microbiology and biochemistry of the soil environ- 
ment. Occurrence, distribution, ecology, and detection of micro-organisms in soil. (Offered in fall 
of even years. Also listed as ENVM 220 and ENVP 220.) 

225. Environmental Soil Management. I. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 102 and AGRN 103. This course pro- 
vides a foundation for utilizing creative solutions and technical knowledge in preserving and en- 
hancing soil and water quality. Soil conservation, precision agriculture and nutrient management 
for protection of soil and water quality are covered. (Equivalent to ENVP 225) 

230. So/7 Physics. II. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 1 0. Physical properties of soils; water and air relationships 
and their influence on soil productivity. (Offered in spring of even years.) 

251. Weed Control. I. 3 HR. PR: PLSC 52 or consent. Fundamental principles of weed control. 
Recommended control measures for and identification of common weeds. 2 lee, 1 lab. (Offered 
in fall of odd years.) (Also listed as ENVP 251 .) 

252. Grain and Special Crops. II. 3 HR. PR: PLSC 52 or consent. Advanced study of methods in 
the production of grain and special crops. Varieties, improvement, tillage, harvesting, storage, 
and use of crops grown for seed or special purposes. (Offered in spring of even years.) 

254. Forage Crops. I. 3 HR. PR: PLSC 52, AGRN 102 and AGRN 103, or consent. All phases of 
forage crop science, including ecology, taxonomy, management practices used for the production 
of forage and seed, and forage composition, quality, and utilization. 

255. Reclamation of Disturbed Soils. II. 3 HR. PR: Junior standing or above. Principles of soil 
science, geology, hydrology, and engineering will be applied to surface mine planning, overbur- 
den handling during mining, soil replacement and amendments, revegetation practices, acid mine 
drainage control and treatment, hazardous wastes, and land management of disturbed areas. 
(Field trip required.) (Also listed as ENVP 255.) 

325. Forage Harvesting and Storage. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 254, or consent. Advanced study of pro- 
cesses associated with harvesting and storage of forages. 3 HR. lee. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

352. Pedology. II. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 217 or consent. Genesis and evolution of soils considered as 
natural bodies; including both macro-and micromorphological properties. Saturday field trips re- 
quired. 2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

354. Pasture Management and Utilization. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 254 and ANNU 101, or consent. 
Advanced study of pastures and their management and utilization with emphasis on temperate 
species. 3 HR. lee (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

374. Tropical Grasslands. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 254 and ANNU 101 , or consent. Advanced study of 
tropical grasslands and their management and utilization in animal production. (Offered in fall of 
even years.) 

410. Soil Testing and Plant Analysis. II. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 210 and BIOL 169, or consent. Influence 
of soil chemical and physical properties on availability of plant nutrients; intensive study of indi- 
vidual plant nutrients and interactions of nutrients in soils and crops; and intensive study of meth- 
ods used to test soils and analyze plants for nutrients and other metals. 2 lee and 1 lab. (Offered 
in spring of even years.) 

416. Soil Chemistry. I.3HR. PR: Consent. Chemistry of soil development; chemical and mineral- 
ogical composition of soils; nature and properties of organic and inorganic soil colloids; cation 
and anion exchange phenomena; soil chemistry of macro and micro-nutrients. (Offered in fall of 
odd years.) 



86 WVU Graduate Catalog 



418. Chemistry of Soil Organic Matter. II. 3 HR. PR: Organic chemistry or consent. Chemical 
composition of soil organic matter studied in relation to its physico-chemical properties and hu- 
mus formation. Methods involving extraction, fractionation, and purification of soil organic compo- 
nents examined. 2 lee, 1 lab. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

421. Identification of Clay Minerals in Soil. II. 3 Hr PR: Physical chemistry or consent. Character- 
ization of clay minerals is an important aspect in soils, geology, civil engineering, and related 
fields. Study of methods used in qualitative and quantitative identification of these secondary 
minerals in soils and rocks. 1 lee, 2 lab. (Offered in spring of even years.) 

432. Forage Chemistry and Quality. 3 HR. PR: ANNU 301 and AGRN 254, or consent. Advanced 
course in chemistry and biochemistry of pastures and forages, emphasizing factors affecting their 
quality and principles governing their utilization by herbivorous animals. (Also listed as ANNU 
432.) (Offered in spring of even years.) (3 HR. lee.) 

Entomology (ENTO) 

201. Apiculture. II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 1 and BIOL 3 and BIOL 2 and BIOL 4 or consent. Developmen- 
tal, physiology, and behavior of the honey bee with emphasis on colony management, pollination 
of crops, diseases of bees, properties of honey and beeswax, and marketing of honey bee 
products. 

202. Apiculture Laboratory. II. 1 HR. PR or Cone: ENTO 201 . Identification and anatomy of honey 
bees, assembly and use of beekeeping equipment, field management of honey bees, examina- 
tion for diseases and pests, production of queens and numlei. (1 HR. lab.) 

204. Principles of Entomology. I. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 1 and BIOL 3 and BIOL 2 and BIOL 4 or equiv. 
Basic course dealing with the anatomy, morphology, physiology, reproduction, systematics, ecol- 
ogy, and management of insects. 

210. Insects Pests in the Agroecosy 'Stem. I. 3 HR. PR: ENTO 204 or consent. Life cycle, damage, 
and economic impact of pestiferous insects in the agroecosystem. Included are insect pests of 
agricultural and ornamental plants, stored products, structures, and livestock. 2 lee, 1 lab. 

212. Pest Management. II. 3HR. PR: ENTO 204 or consent. An in-depth look at current problems 
and solutions in controlling insect pests in an environmentally compatible manner. Management 
techniques include cultural, mechanical, physical, biological, regulatory, and chemical practices. 
3 HR. lee. (Also listed as ENVP 212.) 

390. Special Topics in Entomology. 2-6 HR. 

Environmental Microbiology (ENVM) 

201. Environmental Microbiology. II. 4 HR. PR: ENVM 141 or consent. Microbiology as applied to 
soil, water, wastewater, sewage, air, and the general environment. Occurrence, distribution, ecol- 
ogy, and detection of microorganisms in these environments. (Also listed as ENVP 201 .) 

220. Soil Microbiology. I. 3 HR. PR: ENVM 141 . Microbiology and biochemistry of the soil environ- 
ment. Occurrence, distribution, ecology, and detection of microorganisms in soil. (Offered in fall of 
even years. Also listed as AGRN 220 and ENVP 220.) 

347. Food Microbiology. 4 HR. 

348. Sanitary Microbiology. II. 3 HR. PR: ENVM 141 or consent. Microbiology and health hazards 
associated with food handling, water treatment, and sanitary waste disposal. (Offered in spring of 
even years.) 

350. Current Concepts in Microbial Ecology. I, II. 1 HR. Emphasis on reading, criticism, and dis- 
cussion of recent journal articles from the primary literature in microbial ecology/environmental 
microbiology. 

Environmental Protection (ENVP) 

200. Environmental Impact Assessment. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 1 and BIOL 2 and BIOL 3 and BIOL 4 
and CHEM 15 and CHEM 16. Application of physical, biological and social science principles to 
assess environmental impacts. Review and prepare environmental assessments, permits, site 
assessments, and ecological risk assessments for environmental decision-making. 

Plant and Soil Sciences 87 



201 . Environmental Microbiology. II. 4 HR. PR: ENVM 141 or consent. Microbiology as applied to 
soil, water, wastewater, sewage, air, and the general environment. Occurrence, distribution, ecol- 
ogy, detection of microorganisms in these environments. (Also listed as ENVM 201.) 

21 2. Pest Management. II. 3 HR. PR: ENTO 204 or consent. An in-depth look at current problems 
and solution in controlling insect pests in an environmentally compatible manner. Management 
techniques include cultural, mechanical, physical, biological, regulatory, and chemical practices. 
3 lee. (Also listed as ENTO 212.) 

220. Soil Microbiology. I. 3 HR. PR: ENVM 141. Microbiology and biochemistry of the soil environ- 
ment. Occurrence, distribution, ecology, and detection of micro organisms in soil. (Offered in fall 
of even years. Also listed as ENVM 220 and AGRN 220.) 

225. Environmental Soil Management. I. 3 HR. PR: AGRN 102 and AGRN 103. This course pro- 
vides a foundation for utilizing creative solutions and technical knowledge in preserving and en- 
hancing soil and water quality. Soil conservation, precision agriculture and nutrient management 
for protection of soil and water quality are covered. (Equivalent to AGRN 225). 

251. Weed Control. I. 3 HR. PR: PLSC 52 or consent. Fundamental principles of weed control. 
Recommended control measures for and identification of common weeds. 2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab. 
(Offered in fall of odd years.) (Also listed as AGRN 251 .) 

255. Reclamation of Disturbed Soils. 3 HR. PR: Junior standing or above. Principles of soil sci- 
ence, geology, hydrology, and engineering will be applied to surface mine planning, overburden 
handling during mining, soil replacement and amendments, revegetation practices, acid mine 
drainage control and treatment, hazardous wastes, and land management of disturbed areas. 
(Field trip required.) (Also listed as AGRN 255.) 

Horticulture (HORT) 

204. Plant Propagation. II. 3 HR. PR: PLSC 52 or consent. Study of practices of plant propagation 
and factors involved in reproduction in plants. 

242. Small Fruits. I. 3 HR. PR: PLSC 52, HORT 107, or Consent. (One 2-day field trip required.) 
Taxonomic, physiological, and ecological principles involved in production and handling of small- 
fruits. 2 lee, 1 scheduled lab. (Offered in fall of odd years.) 

243. Vegetable Crops. I. 3 HR. PR: PLSC 52 or consent. (One 3-day field trip required.) Botanical 
and ecological characteristics influencing the production of vegetable crops. 2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab. 
(Offered in fall of even years.) 

244. Handling and Storage of Horticultural Crops. I. 3 HR. PR: PLSC 52 and CHEM 16. Charac- 
teristics of perishable crops. Methods and materials used to maintain quality. 2 lee, 1 lab. (Of- 
fered in fall of odd years.) 

245. Greenhouse Management. II. 3 HR. PR: Two semesters of Inorganic Chemistry and HORT 
107 or consent. Greenhouse as a controlled plant environment. How to regulate factors influenc- 
ing plant growth and development within specialized environments of greenhouses. 

246. Tree Fruits. I. 3 HR. PR: PLSC 52 or consent. Principles and practices involved in production 
of tree fruits. 2 lee, 1 scheduled lab. (Offered in fall of even years.) 

301 . Post Harvest Physiology. 3 HR. 

Plant Pathology (PPTH) 

201 . General Plant Pathology. I. 4 HR. Nature and causes of plant diseases; methods of control. 

301. Disease of Economic Plants. I, II, S. 1-3 HR.; 2 HR. in summer. PR: PPT 201 or 303 or 
consent. Recognition, cause, and control of diseases of economic plans. (Sem. I — Diseases of 
vegetable crops and of tree and small fruits; Sem. II— Diseases of ornamental plants and field 
and forage crops; S— Disease of forest trees. Students may register for 1-3 hrs. in I and II, 2 HR. 
in S, until 8 hours of credit are accumulated) (Offered in alternate years.) 

302. Principals of Plant Pathology. II. 4 HR. PR: PPTH 153, 201, or 303, or consent. (Primarily for 
graduate students and seniors majoring in biology or agriculture science.) Nature of disease in 
plants with practice in laboratory methods. (Offered in spring of even years.) 



88 WVU Graduate Catalog 



303. Mycology. I. 4 HR. Lectures and field and laboratory studies of parasitic and saprophytic 
fungi. (Offered in fall of even years.) 

309. Nematology. II. 3 HR. (Primarily for graduate students majoring in the agricultural sciences 
or biology.) Nematode taxonomy, bionomics, and control, with particular emphasis on plant para- 
sitic forms. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

313. Insect Transmit Plant Diseases. 3 HR. 

402. Physiology Plant Diseases. I. 3 HR. PR: AGBI 310 and PPTH 302, or consent. Study of 
host-parasite interactions, with emphasis on physiological and biochemical changes that occur in 
higher plant tissue in response to pathogenic organisms. 

430. Physiology of Fungi. II. 4 HR. PR: Organic chemistry, mycology, and bacteriology, or con- 
sent. Physiological aspects of growth, reproduction, and parasitism of fungi, with emphasis on 
nutrition, environment, and other biotic factors. (Offered spring of odd years.) 

440. Taxonomy of the Fungi. S. 3 HR. PR: PPTH 303. Collection and identification of fungi with 
emphasis upon those of economic importance. (Offered in summer of even years.) 

Plant Science (PLSC) 

420. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. Special study in environmental microbiology, crop science, 
horticulture, plant pathology, or soil science. 

450. Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. Graduate seminar in environmental microbiology, crop science, horticul- 
ture, plant pathology, or soil science. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. Graduate research in environmental microbiology, crop science, 
horticulture, plant pathology, or soil science. 



Plant and Soil Sciences 89 



Reproductive Physiology 

E. Keith Inskeep, Chairperson of the Interdisciplinary Faculty 

G-044 Agricultural Science Building 

Degrees Offered: Master of Science: Doctor of Philosophy 

Requirements 

The graduate program in reproductive physiology, leading to master's and doc- 
toral degrees, is interdisciplinary, with faculty located in the Departments of Animal 
and Veterinary Sciences, Biology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pharmacology and 
Toxicology, Physiology, and Plant and Soil Sciences. Requirements for admission 
include at least a 2.75 grade-point average (4.0 system) and completion on the fol- 
lowing prerequisites with a grade of C or better in each: calculus, genetics, organic 
chemistry, physics, and vertebrate embryology. It is recommended, but not required, 
that applicants complete both the aptitude and the advanced tests of the Graduate 
Record Examination. Foreign languages are not required for a degree in reproduc- 
tive physiology. Only a limited number of students are accepted each year. 

Research 

Research topics include function and regression of the corpus luteum, aging of the 
oocyte, control of postpartum reproductive performance, environmental factors in repro- 
duction, control of steroidogenesis, control of estrus and ovulation, new methods of arti- 
ficial insemination, ovarian follicular development, endocrine functions of polypeptides, 
neuroendocrine control of gonadotropic hormone secretion and roles of prostaglandins 
in reproduction. 

Research is almost entirely with farm animals, including poultry. 

Courses 

The program draws on courses offered in various departments and includes courses 
in endocrinology, advanced reproductive physiology, biochemistry, physiology, statistics, 
and developmental embryology. 



90 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Eberly College of Arts and Sciences 

M. Duane Nell is, Ph.D., Dean 
Joan S. Gorham, Ph.D., Associate Dean 
Rudolph P. Almasy, Ph.D., Associate Dean 
Nicholas G. Evans, Ed.D., Associate Dean 
Fred L. King, Ph.D., Associate Dean 
Asuntina S. Levelle, J.D., Assistant Dean 

The Eberly College of Arts and Sciences is West Virginia University's largest college, with 
325 faculty in academic departments and program areas in literature and the humanities, 
social and behavioral sciences, and mathematics and natural sciences. The college sup- 
ports 15 graduate programs, ten of which include doctoral programs; its departments 
occupy 12 buildings on the downtown campus. Many of the faculty enjoy distinguished 
national and international reputations and have been honored for excellence in teaching, 
research, and service. Their awards not only acknowledge extreme dedication but also 
accentuate the relationship between the faculty and the students. Graduate students often 
collaborate with faculty on specialized research projects which lead to publications in na- 
tional and international journals. In 1 995, the faculty of the college produced over 300 pub- 
lications, delivered 315 professional presentations, and received 112 grants and contracts, 
50 professional association citations, and 49 academic honors. In recent years, Arts and 
Sciences faculty have generated over $6,000,000 annually in external support for research 
and instruction. 

The Eberly College of Arts and Sciences offers doctoral programs in biology, chem- 
istry, English, geography, geology, history, mathematics, physics, political science, 
and psychology. Available research or teaching concentrations are as follows: 

• Biology — cellular and molecular biology, environmental plant biology. 

• Chemistry — analytical, inorganic, organic, physical, and theoretical chemistry. 

• English— literature. 

• Geography — regional development, geographic information systems. 

• Geology — energy (basin analysis), environmental geology. 

• History — United States (Appalachia), Europe, Africa, science, and technology. 

• Mathematics — selected areas of pure, applied, and discrete mathematics. 

• Physics — condensed matter, applied physics, plasma physics, astrophysics, 
electro-optics, and elementary particle physics. 

• Political science — public policy analysis (domestic and international). 

• Psychology — behavior analysis, developmental psychology, and clinical psychology. 

Graduate programs leading to a master's degree are available in biology, chemistry, 
communication studies, English, foreign languages, geography, geology, history, liberal 
arts, mathematics, physics, psychology, public administration, sociology and anthropol- 
ogy, and statistics. Each program prepares students for further study or for productive 
roles in professional environments. Information concerning graduate programs in the 
Eberly College of Arts and Sciences may be obtained by contacting Associate Dean for 
Research and Graduate Studies, Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, 201 Woodburn 
Hall, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6286, Morgantown, WV 26505-6286; telephone 
(304)293-4611. 



Eberly College of Arts and Sciences 91 



Graduate Programs 

Biology M.S Ph.D. 

Chemistry M.S Ph.D. 

Communication Studies M.A. 

English M.A Ph.D. 

Foreign Languages M.A. 

Geography M.A Ph.D. 

Geology M.S Ph.D. 

History M.A Ph.D. 

Mathematics M.S Ph.D. 

Physics M.S Ph.D. 

Political Science M.A Ph.D. 

Psychology M.A Ph.D. 

Public Administration M.P.A. 

Sociology and Anthropology M.A. 

Statistics M.S. 



Graduate Faculty 

t Indicates regular member of graduate faculty. 
* Indicates associate member of graduate faculty. 

Biology 
Professors 

Edward C. Keller, Jr., Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Ecology, Genetics. 

r Gerald E. Lang, Ph.D. (Rutgers U.). Provost. Plant ecology, Biogeochemistry, Wetland ecology. 

Barnes B. McGraw, Ph.D. (Duke U.). Plant ecology, Plant population biology. 

'Richard P. Sutter, Ph.D. (Tufts U.). Cellular/molecular biology, developmental biology, molecular genetics. 

Associate Professors 

r Dorothy C. Dunning, Ph.D. (Tufts U.). Bat prey defenses and other aspects of bat biology. 

r Philip E. Keeting, Ph.D. (U. Med. Dent. Sen.). Molecular endocrinology. 

1 Ramsey Frist, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Biophysics. 

t Keith Garbutt, Ph.D. (U. Wales). Chairperson. Population genetics, Plant ecology. 

Assistant Professors 

Ashok Bidwai, Ph.D. (Utah State). Molecular and biochemical analysis of protein kinases. 

"•"Clifford P. Bishop, Ph.D. (U. Va.). Developmental and molecular biology of Drosophila. 

^Jonathan R. Cumming, Ph.D. (Cornell U.). Plant physiology, Rhizosphere ecology. 

f Jorge A. Flores, Ph.D. (George Wash. U.). Endocrinology of reproduction, signal transduction. 

T William T Peterjohn, Ph.D. (Duke U.). Biogeochemistry, Ecosystem ecology. 

"Jeffrey L. Price, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins U.). Drosophila genetics, Circadian rhythms. 

Richard B. Thomas, Ph.D. (Clemson U.). Physiological plant ecology, Global environmental change. 

f Ray Thweatt, Ph.D. (U. of Texas Health Sci. Center). Cellular senescence, Molecular biology of 

aging. 
Clinical Assistant Professor 
Donna Ford-Werntz, Ph.D. (Missouri). Plant systematics. 

Chemistry 
Professors 

Robert S. Nakon, Ph.D. (Tex. A&M U.). Bioinorganic chemistry, Chelates, Catalysis. 
^Jeffrey L. Petersen, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Physical inorganic chemistry, Organometallic chemistry, X-ray 

diffraction, Catalysis, Olefin polymerization. 
Reuben H. Simoyi, Ph.D. (Brandeis U.). Physical chemistry, Chemical kinetics, Oscillating reactions. 
r Kenneth Showalter, Ph.D. (U. Colo.). C. Eugene Bennett Chairot Chemistry, Chemical 

kinetics, Multistability and oscillating systems. 



92 WVU Graduate Catalog 



T Kung K. Wang, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Organic chemistry, Stereoselective synthesis, Natural products. 

Associate Professors 

f Harry O. Finklea, Ph.D. (Calif. Inst. Tech.). Analytical/physical chemistry, Properties of organized 

monolayers deposited on electrodes. 
Charles Jaffe, Ph.D. (U. Col.). Theoretical chemistry, Molecular dynamics, Nonlinear mechanics. 
r Paul W. Jagodzinski, Ph.D. (Tex. A&M U.). Chairperson. Physical chemistry, Raman 

spectroscopy, Molecular spectroscopy. 
tFred L. King, Ph.D. (U. Va.). Analytical chemistry, Mass spectrometry, Gas-phase ion chemistry. 
r John H. Penn, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Organic chemistry, Photochemistry, Electron transfer. 
f Ronald B. Smart, Ph.D. (U. Mich.). Associate Chairperson. Environmental analytical chemistry, 

Electrochemistry, Trace metals. 
f Alan M. Stolzenberg, Ph.D. (Stanford U.). Inorganic chemistry, Bioinorganic chemistry, 

Organometallic chemistry. 
Assistant Professors 
f Kay M. Brummond, Ph.D. (Penn State U.). Synthetic organic chemistry, synthetic methods, 

natural products synthesis. 
Catharine J. Covert, Ph.D. (Cornell U.). Inorganic and organometallic chemistry; Synthesis, 

kinetics, and reaction mechanisms. 
Terry Gullion, Ph.D. (William and Mary). Physical Chemistry, Solid State NMR, Structural 

Elucidation. 
Debra L. Mohler, Ph.D. (U. Cal-Berkeley). Organic chemistry, Bioorganic and bioorganomettalic 

chemistry, Nanostructures. 
Vincent T Remcho, Ph.D. (Va. Tech.). Analytical chemistry, Chemical separations, Chromatography, 

electrophoresis. 
Bjom C. Sodenberg, Ph.D. (Royal Inst, of Tech. -Stockholm). Organic and organometallic chemistry, 

Synthetic methods, Natural product synthesis. 

Communication Studies 
Professors 

f Melanie Booth-Butterfield, Ph.D. (U. Mo.). Interpersonal communication, Nonverbal 

communication, Communication in health. 
f Joan S. Gorham, Ed.D. (Northern III. U.). Interim Associate Dean. Communication in instruction, 

Nonverbal communication, Mass communication. 
f James C. McCroskey, Ed.D. (Penn. St. U.). Chairperson. Communication avoidance, 

Communication in instruction, Interpersonal and organizational communication. 
Virginia P. Richmond, Ph.D. (U. Nebr.). Interpersonal and organizational communication, 

Nonverbal communication, Communication in instruction. 
Associate Professors 
f Steven Booth-Butterfield, Ed.D. (WVU). Mass communication, Interpersonal communication, 

Communication in instruction, Persuasion, Health communication. 

Assistant Professors 

Robert A. Barraclough, Ed.D. (WVU). Communication in instruction, Intercultural communication, 

Interpersonal communication, Organizational communication. 
*Stephen C. Hines, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Interpersonal communication, Persuasion, Research methods. 
Matthew M. Martin, Ph.D. (Kent St. U.). Argumentation, Personality differences, Interpersonal 

and family communication. 
tBrian Patterson, Ph.D. (U. Okla.). Interpersonal communication, Nonverbal communication, 

Health communication. 

English 
Professors 

f Timothy D. Adams, Ph.D. (Emory U.). American autobiography, American literature, American studies. 
r Dennis Allen, Ph.D. (U. Minn.). Critical theory, Prose fiction, Popular culture. 
Patrick W. Conner, Ph.D. (U. Md.). Chairperson. Eberly College Centennial Professor in English. 
Anglo-Saxon literature and culture, Medieval English literature, Humanities computing. 



Eberly College of Arts and Sciences 93 



T Richard B. Eaton, Jr., Ph.D. (U. N.C.). 19th-and 20th-century American literature, Eugene O'Neill. 

T William W. French, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Shakespeare and Renaissance drama and literature, 
Contemporary theatre, Modern American and British drama. 

T Elaine Ginsberg, Ph.D. (U. Okla.). M.A. Supervisor, American literature, Women writers, Feminist 
theory. 

'Robert Markley, Ph.D. (U. Penn.). Jackson Family Chair in British Literature, Restoration and 18th- 
century literature, Science studies, Cultural studies. 

r Brian McHale, Ph.D. (Oxford). Ph.D. Supervisor, Eberly Family Professor of American Literature. 
Postmodernism, American literature, Cultural studies. 

'Thomas H. Miles, Ph.D. (SUNY— Binghamton). Scientific and technical writing, Rhetoric, Online 
distance learning. 

T Kevin Oderman, Ph.D. (U. Calif.). American poetry, American literature, Creative writing: essay. 

r Frank Scafella, Jr., Ph.D. (U. Chicago). American novel, American romantics, Literature and 
religion, Science fiction/fantasy. 

f Cheryl B. Torsney, Ph.D. (U. Fla.). American fiction, Henry James, Literary theory, Women writers. 

Associate Professors 

r Rudolph P. Almasy, Ph.D. (U. Minn.). Acting Dean. Renaissance and Reformation studies, 
Composition. 

f Laura Brady, Ph.D. (U. Minn.). Composition and rhetorical theory, Women's studies. 

f Anna Shannon Elfenbein, Ph.D. (U. Nebr.). American literature, Women's studies, Film. 

T John Lamb, Ph.D. (NYU). Assistant Editor, Victorian Poetry, Victorian literature and culture, 
Victorian historiography. 

^yron C. Nelson, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Ranters and religious radicals, Elizabethan, Jacobean, and 
Restoration drama. 

r Susan Shaw Sailer, Ph.D. (U. Wash.). Irish poetry, James Joyce, Literary theory, Epics. 

timothy Sweet, Ph.D. (U. Minn.). American studies (1 7th-1 9th-century), Literature and photography. 
Native American literature. 

Assistant Professors 

^ail Adams, M.A. (U. Texas). American studies, Creative writing. 

^ernadette Andrea, Ph.D. (Cornell U.). Renaissance and Seventeenth Century studies. 

*Gwen Bergner, Ph.D. (Princeton U.). African-American and Multi-Ethnic literatures. 

'Patricia DeMarco, Ph.D. (Duke U.). Middle English and general Medieval studies. 

f Marilyn Francus, Ph.D. (Columbia U.). Restoration and 18th-century literature and culture, Women's 
studies, Satire, History of the novel. 

r James Harms, M.F.A. (Indiana U.). Creative writing (poetry), Contemporary poetry. 

'Ethel Morgan Smith, M.A. (Hollins College). Creative writing: fiction, Nonfiction essay, African- 
American literature. 

r David Stewart, D. Phil. (Oxford U.). British romanticism, Literary theory. 

'Susan Warshauer, Ph.D. (U. of Texas). Humanities computing, drama, and composition. 

Foreign Languages 
Professors 

'Robert J. Elkins, Ph.D. (U. Kans.). Emeritus. German. Language methodology, German radio plays, 

English as a second language. 
f Kathleen E. McNemey, Ph.D. (U. N. Mex.). Catalan language and literature, Spanish literature and culture. 
T Frank W. Medley, Jr., Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Chairperson. Spanish, Foreign language education. 
'Joseph A. Murphy, Ph.D. Emeritus. (Ohio St. U.). Associate Chairperson. French. English as a 

second language, Foreign language education. 
r Joseph J. Prentiss, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Emeritus. Classics. Greek and Latin literature, Classical 

mythology. 
r Janice Spleth, Ph.D. (Rice U.). French. Francophone literature and culture. 
Associate Professors 
'Marilyn Bendena, Ph.D. (Wayne St. U.). French, Russian. Russian literature/culture, 

Contemporary French novel. 
T Jeffrey Bruner, Ph.D. (Rutgers U.). Graduate coordinator. Modern Spanish peninsular literature. 
f Axel W. Claesges. Ph.D. (Vanderbilt U.). German. German cultural and intellectual history, 19th 

century literature, Commercial German. 



94 WVU Graduate Catalog 



"Ahmed Fahkri. Ph.D. (U. Mich.). TESL. Second language acquisition. Applied linguistics. Discourse 

analysis. 
"Daniel Ferreras. Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Comparative Romance literature. French/Spanish 19th and 

20th century novel. Theory of the fantastic. 
'Pablo Gonzalez. Ph.D. (U. Madrid). Spanish. Spanish-American literature. Commercial Spanish. 
"Michael Lastinger. Ph.D. (U. Ga.). French. 19th century French literature. Critical theory. 
"Valerie Lastinger. Ph.D. (U. Ga.). French. 18th century French literature. French women writers. 
"Michael E. Reider. Ph.D. (U. Iowa). Spanish. Linguistics. Syntax and phonology, Psycholinguistics. 
'Joseph F. Renahan. M.S. (Yeshiva U.). Emeritus. Spanish. French and Spanish philology. Spanish 

Golden Age drama. 
'Jurgen Schlunk. Ph.D. (U. Marburg). German. 18th century German literature. 19th and 20th 

century German drama. 
Assistant Professors 

'Maria Amores. Ph.D. (Penn St. LI.). Spanish. Foreign language acquisition. 
"Susan Bradi. Ph.D. (U. Del.). ESL. Applied linguistics. Second language acquisition. Syntax. 
'Sandra Dixon. Ph.D. (Brown U.). Spanish. Portugese literature. Spanish-American literature. 
"Deborah Janson. Ph.D. (U. Cal.). German. The Enlightenment. Romanticism. 20th Century 

literature. GDR literature. Ecofeminism. 
"Twyla Meding. Ph.D. (U. Va.). French. 16th and 17th century French literature. The pastoral novel. 
"Johan Seynnaeve. Ph.D. (Cornell U.). General linguistics. Sociolinguistics. Phonology. 
"Sharon Wilkinson. Ph.D. (Penn St. U.). French. Foreign language acquisition. 

Geology and Geography 
Professors 

'Robert E. Behling. Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Geomorphology. 

"Frank J. Calzonetti. Ph.D. (U. Okla.). WV EPSCOR Director. Energy and regional development. 

Industrial location. 
"Alan C. Donaldson, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Emeritus. Sedimentation-stratigraphy. 
"Gregory A. Elmes. Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). GIS. Spatial modeling. Energy and environment. 
"Trevor M. Harris. Ph.D. (U. Hull). Chairperson. Geographic information systems. 
"Milton T Heald. Ph.D. (Harvard U.). Emeritus. Mineralogy and petrology. 
'Thomas W. Kammer. Ph.D. (Ind. U.). Paleontology. 

"Kenneth C. Martis. Ph.D. (U. Mich.). Political geography. Historical geography. 
M. Duane Nellis. Ph.D. (Oregon State U.). Satellite Remote Sensing. Natural resources. 
'Henry W. Rauch. Ph.D. (Penn St. U.). Hydrogeology and geochemistry. 
"John J. Renton. Ph.D. (WVU). Geochemistry. 

"Robert C. Shumaker. Ph.D. (Cornell U.). Emeritus. Petroleum geology. 
"Richard A. Smosna. Ph.D. (III. U.). Carbonate sedimentation. 
"Thomas H. Wilson. Ph.D. (WVU). Geophysics. 
Associate Professors 

"Robert Q. Hanham. Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Urban and regional systems. Research methods. 
"Ronald Harris. Ph.D. (V. College. London). Structural geology. 
"J. Steven Kite. Ph.D. (U. Wise). Geomorphology. 
"Helen Lang. Ph.D. (U. Ore.). Petrology and mineralogy. 

"Ann M. Oberhauser. Ph.D. (Clark U.). Economic restructuring. Gender studies. Europe. 
"Daniel Weiner. Ph.D. (Clark U.). Director. Office of International Programs. Development geography. 

Political ecology. Africa. 
Assistant Professors 

"Joseph Donovan. Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Hydrogeology and geochemistry. 
"Calvin Masilela. Ph.D. (VPI). Planning. International development and land use policy. 
'Timothy A. Warner. Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Remote sensing. 

History 
Professors 

"Wesley M. Bagby. Ph.D. (Columbia U.). Recent U.S.. U.S. diplomatic. Sino-American relations. 
'Robert E. Blobaum. Ph.D. (U. Nebr.). Russia. East Europe. Poland. 20th-century political and 
social history. 

Eberly College of Arts and Sciences 95 



T Jack L. Hammersmith, Ph.D. (U. Va.). Modern U.S., U.S. diplomatic, 

U.S. -Japanese relations. 
Donald L. Lewis, Ph.D. (U. Akron). Eberly Professor. Modern U.S., West Virginia/Appalachia, 

Labor, South. 
Robert M. Maxon, Ph.D. (Syracuse U.). Africa, East Africa, economic and imperial. 
r Stephen C. McCluskey, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Medieval Europe, History of Science, Astronomies of 

traditional cultures. 
T John R. McKivigan, Ph.D. (Ohio State U.). 19th-century U.S., Ethnic history, popular culture, 

American reform movements. 
f John C. Super, Ph.D. (UCLA). Latin America, Spain, Biography, Food and agriculture. 
Associate Professors 
*William S. Arnett, Ph.D. (Ohio State U.). Ancient, Egyptology, aging and the elderly in the ancient 

Middle East. 
^elen M. Bannan, Ph.D. (Syracuse U.). U.S. Women, Native Americans. 
T Amos J. Beyan, Ph.D. (WVU). West Africa, African diaspora, African-American. 
T Elizabeth A. Fones-Wolf, Ph.D. ( U. Mass). Modern U.S., 20th-century economic and social, 

Business. 
Gregory A. Good, Ph.D. (U. Toronto). History of Science, 18th- and 19th-century science, History 

of instruments and scientific institutions. 
r Barbara J. Howe, Ph.D. (Temple U.). Chairperson. Modern U.S., Public History, U.S. urban and 

women. 
T Mary Lou Lustig, Ph.D. (Syracuse U.). Colonial and revolutionary U.S., Political and cultural, 

17th- and 18th-century England, U.S. constitutional. 
r A. Michal McMahon, Ph.D. (Texas). 18th- and 19th-century U.S. environmental history, History of 

Technology. 
T Steven M. Zdatny, Ph.D. (U. Penn). Modern Europe, France, Social. 
Assistant Professors 
Catherine Aaslestad, Ph.D. (U. III.). Europe, Germany, Cultural, Urban, and International 

relations. 
f Steven J. Ericson, Ph.D. (Harvard U.). Japan, East Asia. 
Caroline J. Litzenberger, Ph.D. (Cambridge U.). Early Modern Europe, England, European 

women, history and computing. 
*Jose V. Pimienta-Bey, Ph.D. (Temple U.). African-American, North Africa. 
'Mark B. Tauger, Ph.D. (UCLA). Russian/Soviet, Modern Europe, Environmental. 
Adjunct Faculty 
Katherine Bankole 
Kenneth Fones-Wolf 
Sally Ward Maggard 
Roger Yeager 

Mathematics 
Professors 

Ian Christie, Ph.D. (Dundee U.). Numerical partial differential equations. 

Harvey R. Diamond, Ph.D. (MIT). Applied probability. 

^arry Gingold, D.Sc. (Israel Inst. Tech.). Differential equations, Perturbation methods, Asymptotic methods. 

tHenry W. Gould, M.A. (U. Va.). Combinatorics, Number theory, Special functions. 

Jack Goodykoontz, Ph.D. (U. Ky.). Topology. 

*Caulton L. Irwin, Ph.D. (Emory U.). Associate Director, Energy Research Center. Variational 

methods, Optimization, Applied mathematics. 
T Jin Bai Kim, Ph.D. (VPI & SU). Emeritus. Algebra, Semigroups. 
f Dening Li, Ph.D. (Fudan U.). Partial differential equations. 
T Larry N. Mann, Ph.D. (U. Penn.). Topology, Geometry. 
Michael E. Mays, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Number theory. 
f Sam B. Nadler, Jr., Ph.D. (U. Ga.). Continuum theory. 



96 WVU Graduate Catalog 



William H. Simons, Ph.D. (Carnegie-Mellon U.). Analysis, Differential equations, Applied mathematics. 

f Cun-Quan Zhang, Ph.D. (Simon Fraser U.). Combinatorics, Graph theory. 

Associate Professors 

tKrzysztof Ciesielski, Ph.D. (Warsaw U.). Analysis, Topology. 

t Weifu Fang, Ph.D. (Claremont). Applied Mathematics. 

tGary Ganser, Ph.D. (RPI). Applied mathematics, Fluid mechanics. 

f John Goldwasser, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Combinatorics, Linear algebra. 

tHarumi Hattori, Ph.D. (RPI.). Differential equations, Continuum mechanics, Numerical analysis. 

V\ndrzej Karwowski, Ph.D. (Rutgers U.). Continuum mechanics. 

tHong-Jian Lai, Ph.D. (Wayne St. U.). Combinatorics, Graph theory. 

Barnes E. Miller, Ph.D. (U. Ky.). Complex analysis. 

Barnes L. Moseley, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Partial differential equations. 

John W. Randolph, Ph.D. (U. Va.). Algebra. 

f Joseph Wilder, Ph.D. (RPI). Applied mathematics. 

f Jerzy Wojciechowski, Ph.D. (Cambridge U.). Combinatorics, Graph theory. 

Philosophy 
Professors 

tRalph W. Clark, Ph.D. (U. Colo.). Ethics, Business ethics, Metaphysics. 

Theodore M. Drange, Ph.D. (Cornell U.). Philosophy of religion, Epistemology. 

*Mark R. Wicclair, Ph.D. (Columbia U.). Philosophy of law, Medical ethics, Ethics. 

Associate Professors 

tRichard A. Montgomery, Ph.D. (U. III. -Chicago). Chairperson. Philosophy of mind/cognitive 

science, Philosophy of science. 
Daniel Shapiro, Ph.D. (U. Minn.). Social and political philosophy, Ethics, Philosophy of law. 

Physics 
Professors 

f Bemard R. Cooper, Ph.D. (U. Calif.). Benedum Professor of Physics. Condensed matter and 

materials theory. 
r Boyd F. Edwards, Ph.D. (Stanford U.). Fluid dynamics, Combustion processes, Percolation theory. 
t Martin V. Ferer, Ph.D. (U. III.). Phase transitions and critical phenomena, Theory. 
f Larry E. Halliburton, Ph.D. (U. Mo.). Chairperson. Solid state physics, Experiment. 
Richard T Kouzes, Ph.D. (Princeton U.). Nuclear physics, Physics education. 
tJohn E. Littleton, Ph.D. (U. Rochester). Astrophysics. 

Carl A. Rotter, Ph.D. (Case W. Res. U.). Eberly Professor. Neutron scattering, Physics education. 
f Mohindar S. Seehra, Ph.D. (U. Rochester). Eberly Professor. Magnetic, electronic, optical 

properties of solids, Experiment. 
t H. Arthur Weldon, Ph.D. (MIT). Particle physics, Quantum fields, Theory. 
Associate Professors 

f Wathiq Abdul-Razzaq, Ph.D. (U. Illinois-Chicago Circle). Solid state physics, Experiment. 
r Nancy C. Giles, Ph.D. (N.C. St. U.). Optical properties of semiconductors, Experiment. 
*Mark E. Koepke, Ph.D. (U. Maryland). Plasma physics, Experiment. 
Thomas H. Myers, Ph.D. (N.C. St. U.). MBE growth of ll-VI semiconductors. 
Assistant Professors 

T David Lederman, Ph.D. (U Calif. -Santa Barbara). Condensed matter physics, Experiment. 
Leonardo Golubovic, Ph.D. (Belgrade U.). Condensed matter theory and statistical physics. 
r Earl E. Scime, Ph.D. (U. Wise. -Madison). Plasma physics, Experiment. 

Political Science 
Professors 

Robert E. DiClerico, Ph.D. (Ind. U.). Director of Undergraduate Studies. American politics, 
Presidential politics, Political parties, Electoral behavior, Public policy (Agenda setting). 

f Robert Dilger, Ph.D. (Brandeis U.). Director, Institute for Public Affairs. Intergovernmental 
relations, State and local government, Congress. 



Eberly College of Arts and Sciences 97 



r Joe D. Hagan, Ph.D. (U. Ky.). International relations and world politics, Foreign policy 

analysis. 
T Hong N. Kim, Ph.D. (Georgetown U.). Comparative politics (Asia), Comparative public policy. 
T Donley Studlar, Ph.D. (Ind. U.) Eberly Distinguished Professor. British politics, Comparative 

politics (European and English-speaking regimes), Gender and ethnic politics. 
"Rodger D. Yeager, Ph.D. (Syracuse U.). Comparative politics, (Africa), Political development. 
Associate Professors 
r Richard A. Brisbin, Jr., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins U.). Public law and judicial politics, Public policy 

(Criminal justice and regulation). 
Robert D. Duval, Ph.D. (Fla. St. U.). Methodology, International politics and policy, Public policy 

(Energy, environmental, foreign). 
t Allan H. Hammock, Ph.D. (U. Va.). Chairperson. American government, Public policy (Civil rights, 

health care). 
T Susan Hunter, Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Public policy (Environment, policy design, ethics), 

Contemporary political theory. 
f John Kilwein, Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Public law, Judicial politics, Public policy, Public administration. 
T Kevin Leyden, Ph.D. (U. Iowa). Congress, Political behavior, Interest groups, Research methods. 
Christopher Z. Mooney, Ph.D. (U. Wise). State politics, Research methods, Legislative politics. 
Jeffrey S. Worsham, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Public policy (regulation, social welfare), Bureaucratic 

politics and public administration. 
Assistant Professors 

tNeil Berch, Ph.D. (U. Wash.). Public policy (political economy), American politics (state and local). 
*Paul Hoyt, M.A. (Ohio St. U.). Comparative politics (Middle East), International relations, U.S. 

Foreign Policy. 

Psychology 

Professors 

t Philip N. Chase, Ph.D. (U. Mass.). Chairperson. Verbal behavior, Concept learning, Individualized 

instruction, Organizational behavior management. 
f Stanley H. Cohen, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Quantitative methods, Applications of computers in 

behavioral sciences, Multivariate analysis. Survey and evaluation research. 
'Philip E. Comer, Ph.D. (WVU). Emeritus. Adjustment and developmental aspects of college life, 

Counseling and psychotherapy, Psychopathology, Diagnostic methods. 
T Barry A. Edelstein, Ph.D. (Memphis St. U.). Social competence, Behavioral assessment, Behavior therapy. 
T Georg H. Eifert, Ph.D. (U. Frankfurt, Germany). Eberly Distinguished Professor. Models and 

treatments of anxiety disorders, Conceptual advances in behavior therapy, Clinical applica- 
tions of classical conditioning principles. 
t William J. Fremouw, Ph.D. (U. Mass.). Cognitive-behavioral therapy, Eating disorders. 
Robert P. Hawkins, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Emeritus. Behavior analysis of child behavior, Behavioral 

assessment, Child treatment programs. 
Daniel E. Hursh, Ph.D. (U. Kansas). Educational psychology, Personalized systems of instruction, 

Language evaluation. 
f Kennon A. Lattal, Ph.D. (U. Ala.). Centennial Professor. Experimental analysis of behavior, Behavi- 
or theory and philosophy, History of psychology. 
Joseph Panepinto, Ph.D. (WVU). Community psychology, Program development and evaluation. 
'Michael Perone, Ph.D. (U. Wise. -Milwaukee). Associate Chairperson. Basic processes in the 

operant behavior of humans and animals, Research methodology, Laboratory application of 

microcomputers, Radical behaviorism. 
T Hayne W. Reese, Ph.D. (U. Iowa). Centennial Professor. Cognitive development across the 

lifespan. Lifespan research methodology, Philosophical analysis. 
T Richard J. Seime, Ph.D. (U. Minn.). Adult behavior therapy and assessment, Eating disorders, 

Mood disorders. 
James N. Shafer, Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Emeritus. Behavior analysis. 
R. T. Walls, Ph.D. (Penn State U.). Educational psychology, Human learning, Vocational 

Rehabilitation. 



WVU Graduate Catalog 



Associate Professors 

r Andrew S. Bradlyn, Ph.D. (U. Miss.). Pediatric behavioral medicine, Child behavior therapy and 

assessment. 
James Capage, Ph.D. (Ohio U.). Clinical assessment, Psychotherapy, Abnormal behavior. 
Virginia L. Goetsch, Ph.D. (U. Ga.). Behavioral medicine, Psychophysiology of stress, Anxiety 

disorders. 
Irving J. Goodman, Ph.D. (U. Rochester). Neural mechanisms of behavior, Psychopharmacology, 

Behavioral neuroscience. 
f Carol V. Harris, Ph.D. (U. Fla.). Child and adolescent behavior therapy, Adolescent substance 

abuse, Pediatric behavioral medicine. 
Catherine Hildebrandt Karraker, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Infant social development, Physical ap- 
pearance effects on development, Parent-infant relations. 
f Kevin Larkin, Ph.D. (U. Pitt). Behavioral assessment and treatment of anxiety-related disorders, 

Relationship between cardiovascular reactivity and cardiovascular disease. 
Alice Darnell Lattal, Ph.D. (WVU). Organizational behavior management. 
*John C. Linton, Ph.D. (Kent U.). Behavioral medical psychology, Crisis intervention. 
Daniel W. McNeil, Ph.D. (U. Ala.). Director of Clinical Training. Experimental psychopathology, 

Fear, Anxiety, Phobia. 
Vernon Odom, Ph.D. (U. N.C.). Abnormal and normal visual development. 
f B. Kent Parker, Ph.D. (U. Utah). Conditioning and learning, Animal cognition, Stimulus control and 

memory, Research design and statistics. 
f David W. Schaal, Ph.D. (U. Fla.) Behavioral pharmacology, delayed reinforcement, radical 

behaviorism. 
Joseph R. Scotti, Ph.D. (SUNY-Binghamton). Mental retardation and developmental disabilities, 

AIDS prevention, Behavioral systems, Standards of practice, Treatment of survivors of trauma. 
Assistant Professors 
"^Christina D. Adams, Ph.D. (Louisiana State U.). Adolescent psychopathology, Test construction, 

Pediatric psychology. 
Dennis Becotte, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Federal corrections. 

Martin Boone, Ph.D. (Okla. St. U.). Behavioral medicine, Clinical neuropsychology. 
David Brunetti, Ph.D. (Okla. St. U.). Individual and group psychotherapy, Psychological assess- 
ment, Forensic evaluation 
Jeannie Sperry Clark, Ph.D. (Ohio U.). Factors associated with successful placement and 

improvement of psychiatric inpatients, Ethical decisions in psychotherapy. 
Bruce Corsino, Ph.D. (Fla. Inst. Tech.). Ethics and psychology, Informed consent, End-of-life 

treatment issue. 
f John Crosbie, Ph.D. (Flinders U. South Australia). Human operant behavior, Programmed 

instruction, Statistical analysis of single-subject data. 
Lydia Eifert-McLarnon, Ph.D. (Concordia U.). Illness behavior, Chronic and acute pain, Women's 

health issues. 
Jeffrey Hammond, Ph. D. (U.S. International U.). Supervision, Forensic psychology, Psychotherapy. 
Jennifer Haut, Ph.D. (U. North Dakota). Behavioral medicine. 
f Marc Haut, Ph.D., (U. North Dakota). Behavioral medicine. 
Alfred Kasprowicz, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Behavioral medicine, Psychophysiology. 
Donald K. Kincaid, Ed.D. (WVU.). Developmental disabilities, Positive behavior support, Personal 

futures planning. 
Jan M. Kouzes, Ed.D. (Indiana U. ). Psychotherapy with individuals, couples, families, groups. 
Cheryl B. McNeil, Ph.D. (U. Fla.). Disruptive behavior disorders of children, Assessment, Parent- 
child interactions. 
H'racy L. Morris, Ph.D. (U. Miss.). Peer relationships and social anxiety in children, Parent-child 

interactions, Internalizing disorders in children. 
T Anne Watson O'Reilly, Ph.D. (U. Mich.). Cognitive development in young children, Representational 

ability, Symbolic thought 
Ruth Ann Pannepinto, Ph.D. (WVU). Community psychology. 
tJerry B. Richards, Ph.D. (Emory U.). Impulsive behavior, Drug abuse, Behavioral pharmacology, 

Behavioral neuroscience, Animal models of psychopathology. 
Brian H. Sharp, Ph.D. (WVU). Clinical neuropsychology and rehabilitation, Traumatic brain injury. 



Eberly College of Arts and Sciences 99 



Julie Smith, Ph.D. (WVU). Organizational performance systems. Innovation and creativity, Training 

systems. 
Nina Spadaro, Ed.D. (WVU). Family and marriage maintenance during incarceration, Group therapy. 
Thomas J. Spencer, Ph.D. (WVU). Organizational behavior management. 
f JoNell Strough, Ph.D. (U. Utah). Problem-solving and interpersonal relationships across the life span, 

Interpersonal processes in aging. 
Mark D. Weist, Ph.D. (Va. Poly. Inst, and St. U. ). School-based mental health services. 
Leslie Wilk, Ph.D. (W. Mich. U.). Organizational behavior management, Performance management 

and leadership. 
Christina Sara Wilson, Ph.D. (Wayne St. U. ). Clinical neuropsychology, Dementia, Head Injury. 

Public Administration 
Professors 

T Gerald M. Pops, Ph.D. (Syracuse U.), J.D. (U. Calif.). Personnel, Public law. 

T David G. Williams, Ph.D. (SUNY Albany) Chairperson. Public organization, Management. 

Associate Professors 

r Kenneth A. Klase, D.P.A. (U. Ga.). Public budgeting and finance, Public policy analysis, Planning. 

Assistant Professors 

Nancy Adams, M.S.N. (U. Md.). Healthcare administration. 

L. Christopher Plein, Ph.D. (U. Mo.). Public policy, Legal and Political foundations. 

Soo Geun Song, D.P.A. (U. Ga.). Research methods, Public budgeting and finance, Policy analysis. 

Sociology and Anthropology 
Professors 

Donald C. Althouse, Ph.D. (U. Minn.). Chairperson, Sociology. Theory, Work, Occupational safety 

and health. 
r Richard A. Ball, Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Sociology. Deviant behavior, Criminology, Social psychology. 
f Jerold M. Starr, Ph.D. (Brandeis U.). Sociology. Life course, Social movements, Sociology of 

knowledge. 
Associate Professors 

t Sally W. Maggard, Ph.D. (U. Ky.). Sociology. Appalachian studies, Gender, Work, Social change. 
f Lawrence T Nichols, Ph.D. (Boston C). Sociology. Criminology, Sociology of business, Theory, 

Qualitative methods. 
*Ann L. Paterson, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Sociology. Education, Sex roles, Socialization. 
Tartricia Rice, M.A. (Ohio St.). Anthropology. Prehistoric art, Physical archaeology. 
f Kenyon R. Stebbins, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Anthropology. Medical anthropology, Latin America, 

Political economy of history. 
Assistant Professors 
Melissa Latimer, Ph.D. (U. Ky.). Sociology. Stratification and inequality, Poverty, Labor market 

analysis, Work and occupations, Gender and race issues, Sociology of sports, Violence against 

women. 
F. Carson Mencken, Ph.D. (LSU). Sociology. Stratification, Work and labor markets, Industrial, Job 

matching, Networks. 
Gretchen Stiers, Ph.D. (U. of Mass.). Sociology. Medical sociology, Health, Aging, Family, Gender 

relations. 

Statistics 
Professors 

f Erdogan Gunel, Ph.D. (SUNY-Buffalo). Bayesian inference, Biostatistics, Categorical data 

analysis. 
*E. James Harner, Ph.D. (Cornell U.). Chairperson. Dynamic graphics, Statistical computing, 

Statistical modeling, Statistical education. 
William V. Thayne, Ph.D. (U. III.). Experimental design, Statistical genetics, Regression 

analysis. 
T Edwin C. Townsend, Ph.D. (Cornell U.). Experimental design, Regression analysis. 



1 00 WVU Graduate Catalog 



'Stanley Wearden, Ph.D. (Cornell U.). Emeritus. Biostatistics. Statistical genetics. Population 
biology. 

Associate Professors 

'Daniel M. Chilko. M.S. (Rutgers U.). Statistical computing. Computer graphics. 

'Gerald R. Hobbs. Jr.. Ph.D. (Kansas St. U.). Biostatistics. Nonparametric statistics. Regres- 
sion analysis. 

"Magdalena Niewiadomska-Bugaj. Ph.D. (Adam Mickiewicz U.. Poznan. Pol.). Classification. 
Categorical data analysis. Statistical computing. 

Adjunct Associate Professors 

Michael D. Artfield. Ph.D. (WVU). Design and analysis of experiments. 

James T. Wassell. Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Biostatistics. Survival analysis. Nonparametric 
statistical methods. 

Women's Studies 
Professor 

'Judith G. Stitzel. Ph.D. (U. Minn.). Women's studies. Feminist pedagogy. Creative writing. 

Associate Professor 

Helen M. Bannan. Ph.D. (Syracuse U.). Director. Women's Studies. American Indian history. 

Visiting Assistant Professor. 

Barbara Scott Winkler. Ph.D. (U. Mich.). Women's studies, Feminist pedagogy. History of sexuality. 



Biology 

Keith Garbutt. Chairperson of the Department 

200 Brooks Hall 

Degrees Offered: Master of Science. Doctor of Philosophy 

The Department of Biology offers graduate studies leading to the degrees of doctor of 
philosophy and master of science. The doctor of philosophy degree is offered in the area 
of cellular and molecular biology and in the area of environmental plant biology, with 
research concentration in the areas of gene regulation and transcriptional control during 
development: genetic analysis of circadian rhythms: positional effects on gene expres- 
sion; cellular and molecular bases of regulation of cell proliferation: pheromonal commu- 
nication: bone cell differentiation: endocrinology of reproduction: analysis of protein 
kinases: molecular biology of aging: uses of remote sensing in evaluation of forest health: 
population and ecological genetics of plants: environmental stress physiology: mycor- 
rhizal-plant interactions and physiological, population, community and ecosystem ecol- 
ogy with an emphasis on global climate change, regional environmental issues and 
conservation of biodiversity. The master of science provides specialization in animal 
behavior as well as in cellular and molecular biology and environmental plant biology as 
listed above. Each degree requires completion of an original research project which 
represents the principal theme about which the graduate program is constructed. 

Master of Science 

Prerequisites and Requirements Applicants for the master of science program in biol- 
ogy must show at the minimum the equivalent of a bachelor's degree from an accredited 
institution, an undergraduate grade-point average of 3.0. a 50th percentile ranking for 
the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the Graduate Record Examination: an 
adequate science background, which normally includes one year of physics and two 
years of chemistry: and a sufficient knowledge in biology as reflected in scores normally 
greater than the 50th percentile on all three sections of the GRE subject test in Biology. 
Applicants are requested to submit a one — page essay describing past research experi- 
ence and expectations for career goals. Three letters of recommendation from individuals 

Biology 101 



familiar with the applicant's academic performance are required as well as official tran- 
scripts from all colleges or universities attended. The Department of Biology's Graduate 
Committee reviews the applicant's records and makes the admission decisions. 

The WVU general requirements for the master of science are outlined elsewhere in 
the graduate catalog. Students in the biology M.S. program may apply up to six hours of 
research credit toward the 30-hour requirement; the remaining 24 hours of credit must 
be earned in graduate courses which reflect a diversified exposure to biology. The estab- 
lishment of an advisory committee and the generation of a program of study are 
explained in detail in the department's Graduate Student Handbook. A final oral exami- 
nation is administered by the advisory committee after the program of study has been 
completed and the thesis has been submitted. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program The program for the degree of doctor of philosophy concentrating in cellular 
and molecular biology, or in environmental plant biology, reflects a flexible, research- 
oriented approach geared to develop the interests, capabilities, and potentials of mature 
students. Applicants must have met all the entrance requirements listed above for the 
master of science program. Acceptance into the Ph.D. program is by vote of the Gradu- 
ate Committee of the Department of Biology. This committee ensures that all entrance 
requirements are met or that provisions have been made to remedy the deficiencies, and 
that facilities and personnel are adequate to support the program to a successful conclusion. 

Each student admitted to the Ph.D. program works under the close supervision of a 
faculty research advisor and an advisory committee: details on the composition and es- 
tablishment of an advisory committee are available in the Graduate Student Handbook. 
Students must have a program of study formulated and approved within 12 months of 
entering the Ph.D. program; all deficiencies must have been removed earlier. Significant 
deviations from an established program of study require approval from the advisory com- 
mittee and the graduate committee. 

Examinations and Dissertation Proposal The advisory committee is responsible for 
overseeing the progress of the student and for administering and judging performance in 
the required examinations; it ensures that all Department of Biology. College of Arts and 
Sciences, and University requirements are met during the course of the student's pro- 
gram of study. The program of study outlines the course work to be taken in support of 
the proposed research. 

Students must successfully complete a Preliminary Exam and Proposal Exam before 
being promoted to candidacy for the Ph.D. The Preliminary Exam is given by the end of 
the fourth semester in residence and consists of two parts, a Written Exam and an Oral 
Exam. The Proposal Exam is taken by the end of the fifth semester in residence and 
consists of a written dissertation research proposal, which is also orally presented before 
the department. 

Candidacy Successful passage of the Preliminary and Proposal examinations leads to 
promotion to candidacy, wherein the student may concentrate fully upon the dissertation 
research and prepare for the final examination. The final examination consists of the 
submission of a completed and acceptable written dissertation and an oral dissertation 
defense. A formal departmental seminar covering the dissertation research must be pre- 
sented before graduation. 



1 02 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Biology (BIOL) 

201. History of Biology. I. 3 HR. PR: (BIOL 1 and BIOL 3 and BIOL 2 and BIOL 4) or BIOL 15. 
History of development of biological knowledge, with philosophical and social backgrounds. 

209. Topics and Problems in Biology. I. II. S. 1-4 HR. (May be repeated for a max. of 6 HR.) PR: 
Permission required. Topics and problems in contemporary biology. All topics or problems must 
be selected in consultation with the instructor. 

21 0. Biometry. 3 hr. PR: STAT 1 01 . Application of quantitative methods and statistics to biological 
data, with emphasis on hands-on hypothesis construction, experimental design, data analysis 
and biological interpretation of statistical results. Lec-3 hrs Lab-0 hrs/Contact-3 hrs. 

211. Advanced Cellular/Molecular Biology. II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 19. Advanced study of fundamental 
cellular activities and their underlying molecular processes. Cellular structure and organization, 
protein structure and function, transcription, translation, and control of gene expression. 

212. Advanced Cellular/Molecular Biology-Laboratory. II. 1 HR. Coreq: BIOL 211. Experimental 
approaches to the study of cellular systems. 

213. Introduction to Virology. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 19. Survey of viruses: their modes of replication: 
contributions made to molecular biology, significance of viral diseases in agriculture and medi- 
cine, and contemporary use of viruses in biotechnology. 3 HR. Lee. 

214. Molecular Basis of Cellular Growth. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 19. Study of the integration of events 
as they regulate the growth and division of cells. Topics include: hormones as cell effectors, and 
the cancer cell as a model system. 

216. Cell and Molecular Biology Methods. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 19. Introduction to the theory and 
application of basis analytical tools used in molecular biology. Selected topics included are: hy- 
drodynamic methods, chromatography, electrophoresis, and general laboratory methods. 
(Offered in even years.) 

219. Introduction to Recombinant DNA. I. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 19. An introductory course covering the 
basic principles and techniques of recombinant DNA technology. Includes molecular cloning, iso- 
lation of plasmid DNA. agarose acrylamide gel electrophoresis, restriction enzyme mapping, nucleic 
acid hybridization, and DNA sequencing. 

221. Molecular Genetics. II. 4 hr. PR: BIOL 15. 17. 19. Theoretical and practical knowledge in 
genetics, as a field of study and tool for investigating biological problems, are presented. The 
laboratory is a logical sequence of experiments providing an actual research experience in mo- 
lecular genetics. Lec-3 hrs Lab-3 hrs/Contact-6 hrs. 

222. Cell Structure and Function. 4 hr .; PR: BIOL 21. Students have hands-on experiences in 
methodologies used to study cell structure and function. Light and fluorescence microscopy are 
used to address cell signaling, signal transduction, exocytosis. apoptosis. and regulation of 
gene expression in reproductive endocrinology. Lec-3 hrs/Lab-3 hrs Contact-6 hrs. 

223. Developmental Biology. II. 4 hr . PR: BIOL 15. 17. 19. A molecular genetic analysis of the 
mechanisms by which multicellular organisms develop from single cells. Lec-3 hrs'Lab-4 hrs/ 
Contact-7 hrs. 

231 . Animal Behavior. I. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 21 and ({BIOL 1 and BIOL 3 and BIOL 2 and BIOL 4} or 
BIOL 15). Introduction to animal behavior (ethology), emphasizing the ecology and evolution of 
individual and social behaviors. Laboratory includes independent investigation of behavioral phe- 
nomena. Given in even-numbered years. 

232. Physiological Psychology. I. 3 HR. PR: 9 HR. Psychology, behavior, physiology, or graduate 
standing. Introduction to physiological mechanisms and the neural basis of behavior. (Also listed 
as PSYC232.) 

233. Behavioral Ecology. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 21. Consideration of the influences of environmental 
factors on the short and long term regulation, control, and evolution of the behaviors of animals. 

234. Neuroethology II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL1 7 and 1 9 and (BIOL 231 or BIOL 232). Explores the way 
behavior is controlled in a wide variety of animals, so the similarities and differences in neural 
mechanisms can be better understood. Given in odd-numbered years. 

Biology 1 03 



240. Methods in Ecology and Biogeochemistry. II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 21 . Introduction to the theory 
and application of basic analytical tools used in ecology and biogeochemistry. Topics include 
sampling of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and their environment, and chemical analyses of 
biological materials. (Offered in odd years.) 

243. Plant Ecology. I. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 21. Introduction to the four divisions of plant ecology, 
including physiological, population ecology, community ecology, and ecosystem ecology. (Offered 
in odd years.) 

244. Global Ecology. I. (odd-num. yrs.) 3 HR. PR: BIOL 21. The Earth viewed as a changing 
biogeochemical system. Topics include: the structure, composition and dynamics of the ecospere; 
nutrient cycles; changing atmospheric composition; climate change; ozone depletion; land-use 
change; biological invasions; and changes in biodiversity. 

246. Limnology. I. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 21. Physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of inland 
waters with an introduction to the principles of biological productivity. 

247. Aquaculture. 3 HR. PR: (BIOL 1, 3 and 2, 4) or BIOL 15. An introduction to the farming and 
husbandry of freshwater and marine organisms. Overnight field trips are voluntary. (Offered in 
odd years.) 

248. Comparative Evolutionary Biology of Plants. I. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 1 and BIOL 3 and BIOL 2 and 
BIOL 4. Evolutionary history, morphology, life cycles, and ecology of extant and extinct groups, 
including: cyanobacteria, lichens, algae (green, red, and brown), bryophytes, ferns, fern allies, 
gymnosperms, and angiosperms. Laboratories emphasize comparative analysis of living speci- 
mens. One or two field trips at student's expense. 

249. Plant Systematics. 1. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 1 and BIOL 3 and BIOL 2 and BIOL 4 or BIOL 1 7. Study 
of the taxonomy of flowering plants worldwide and related topics in angiosperm classification and 
evolution. Laboratories emphasize characteristics of selected families of monocotyledons and 
dicotyledons, using living and herbarium material. (5-contact hours) 

251 . Principles of Evolution. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 21 . Introduction to the study of evolution, including 
genetics of evolutionary change, speciation and adaptation molecular evolution, the history of life, 
extinction, co-evolution, and the origins of humans. 

252. Flora of West Virginia. S. 3 HR. PR: (BIOL 1, 3 and 2, 4.) or BIOL15. Identification of local 
woody and herbaceous seed plants, focusing on common native and introduced species. Con- 
ducted primarily through field trips to nearby areas with the use of dichotomous keys to determine 
the scientific names of observed specimens. 

253. Anatomy and Development of Plants. II. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 1 7 or PLSC 52. A comparative study 
of vegetative and reproductive structures (cells, tissue, and organs) of bryophytes and vascular 
plants, with emphasis on flowering plants. Laboratories focus on living plants, and include obser- 
vation of plant development from spores, seeds, and cuttings. One field trip. 

254. Plant Geography. II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 21. World-wide distribution patterns of plants and fac- 
tors related to these distributions — including dispersal. Limiting factors, climate, isolation, evolu- 
tionary history, plate tectonics, pleistocene glaciations, and human activities. Plant communities 
and soils of polar, temperate and tropical biomes are discussed. 

255. Invertebrate Zoology. II. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 19 and 21. The evolution of animals without verte- 
bral columns. The laboratory includes field trips, including one that takes an entire weekend. 
(Dissection kit required.) Given in odd-numbered years. 

257. Ichthyology. II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 17. Internal and external structure of fishes, their systematic 
and ecological relationships, and their distribution in time and space. (Dissection kit required.) 

259. Parasitology. 4 HR. 

260. Plant Development. I. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 1 5, 1 7, 1 9, and 21 and (organic chemistry or biochem- 
istry.) Experimental studies of plant growth and development. 

261. Comparative Anatomy. I. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 15, 17. 19, and 21 or consent. Afunctional and 
evolutionary study of vertebrate structure. (Dissection kit required.) 



1 04 WVU Graduate Catalog 



262. Vertebrate Embryology. 11.4 HR. PR: BIOL 15, 17, 19, and 21 . An experimental and descrip- 
tive analysis of vertebrate development. 

263. Vertebrate Microanatomy. II. 5 HR. PR: BIOL 15, 17, 19, and 21. Structural and functional 
approach to the study of tissues and organs of vertebrates. 

268. Molecular Endocrinology. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 21 Hormonal action is discussed at the cellular 
and molecular levels. Topics include hormone production and regulation, receptor kinetics and 
activation, and receptor out put. 

269. Molecular Endocrinology - Laboratory. I. 1 HR. Coreq: BIOL 268. Experimental techniques 
used to study hormones and receptors. 

270. General Animal Physiology. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 15, 17, 19, and 21. In-depth, current treatment 
of physiological principles which operate at various levels of biological organization in animals of 
diverse taxonomic relationships. Understanding is developed from background lectures and stu- 
dent analysis in discussion sessions of research literature. 

271 . General Animal Physiology-Laboratory. I. 1 HR. Coreq: BIOL 270. After learning basic tech- 
niques, students are provided the opportunity to design, execute, and report upon an indepen- 
dent research project in physiology. 

309. Topics and Problems in Biology. I, II, S. 1-4 HR. PR: Consent. Topics and problems in con- 
temporary biology, to be selected in consultation with instructor. 

311. Biology Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. Discussions and presentations of general interest to biologists. 

314. Molecular Cell Biology. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. An advanced course presenting contemporary 
methodologies and their application to study of problems in cellular organization, molecular ge- 
netics, and developmental biology. Introduction to the research literature is stressed. 

315. Molecular Basis of Virology. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL19orequiv., or consent. Lectures on bacterial, 
animal, and plant viruses; their structure, replication, and interaction with host cells. Discussion of 
the contributions virology has made to the understanding of molecular mechanisms in biology. 

320. Molecular Biology of the Gene. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 19 or consent. Comprehensive survey of 
basic principles, theories, and techniques of molecular biology, including structure/function of 
nucleic acids, DNA replication, transcription, translation, recombination, gene regulation, and func- 
tion. 3 HR. lee. 

324. Cell Structure and Function. 4 HR.; PR: Graduate level status. Students have a hands-on 
experience in methodologies used to study cell structure and function. Light and fluorescence 
microscopy are used to address cell signaling, signal transduction, exocytosis, apoptosis, and 
regulation of gene expression in reproductive endocrinology. Lec-3 hrs/Lab-3 hrs/Contact-6 hrs. 

340. Ecosystem Dynamics. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. A survey of our current understanding of the 
biogeochemistry that occurs at and near the surface of the Earth. Emphasis is placed on the 
biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. The origin and dynamics of 
the atmosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere are also considered. (Offered in even-numbered 
years.) 

341. Plant Population Biology. 3 HR.; PR: Graduate Status or Undergraduate Status with the 
completion of Biology 21 and the Instructor's Permit. Plant Population Biology examines the inter- 
play of ecological theory and the real world of experimental ecology of natural populations using 
a case study approach. Each student will research a current topic in greater depth. Lec-3 hrs/Lab- 
hrs/Contact-3 hrs. 

345. Fisheries Science. II. 4 HR. PR: BIOL 257 or equiv., or consent. Population dynamics in 
relation to principles and techniques of fish management. (Offered in spring of even years.) 

355. Advanced Plant Systematics 1. II 3 HR. PR: BIOL 151 or equiv. Taxonomy of bryophytes, 
pteridophytes, and gymnosperms, emphasizing classification, identification, and nomenclature of 
regional species of mosses, ferns, and conifers. 



Biology 1 05 



356. Advanced Plant Systematics. II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 151 or equiv. Investigation of taxonomic 
problems and methods of plant classification through readings and herbarium, greenhouse, and 
laboratory experiences. Approaches include techniques in comparative morphology, anatomy, 
palynology, cytology, phytochemistry, statistics, and cladistics. 

362. Developmental Biology. I. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 262 or equiv., organic chemistry or biochemistry, 
or consent. The molecular and cellular basis of differentiation and morphogenesis. (Offered in fall 
of odd years.) 

364. Advanced Plant Physiology I, II. 3 HR. PR: BIOL 169, organic chemistry, general physics 
and consent. Advanced studies of plant processes including recent advances in the field. I Sec- 
ond Semester, even numbered years - Mineral nutrition of higher plants. II. First Semester, 
odd - numbered years -Plant growth and development. III. First Semester, odd -numbered years 
- Environmental physiology. 

375. Fundamentals of Gerontology II. 3 HR. PR: MDS 50 or consent. An advanced multidisciplinary 
examination of current research in biological, psychological, and sociological issues of human 
aging and the ways in which these impinge on the individual to create both problems and new 
opportunities. (Also listed as PSYC 375.) 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491. Advanced Study 1-6 HR. 

492. Directed Study 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



Chemistry 

Paul W. Jagodzinski, Chairperson of the Department 
222 Clark Hall or 357 Chemistry Research Laboratory 
Degrees Offered: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy 

The Department of Chemistry offers graduate studies leading to the degrees of master 
of science and doctor of philosophy with research concentration in the areas of analyti- 
cal, inorganic, organic, physical, and theoretical chemistry. The master of science and 
doctor of philosophy degrees require completion of a research project, which represents 
the principal component of the graduate program. 



1 06 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Prerequisites 

Applicants for graduate studies in chemistry must have a bachelor's degree as a mini- 
mum requirement. Applicants must have a major or concentration in chemistry and an 
appropriate background in physics and mathematics. All entering graduate students in 
chemistry are required to take departmental guidance examinations in the major areas 
of chemistry. These examinations, at the undergraduate level, are administered before 
registration and serve to guide the faculty in recommending a course program for the 
beginning graduate student. Deficiencies revealed by the departmental guidance exami- 
nations need to be corrected in a manner prescribed by the faculty. All graduate students 
pursuing M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry are required to teach in the instructional 
laboratories for a minimum of two semesters. 

Thesis/Credits 

The WVU general requirements for the master of science degree are outlined else- 
where in this catalog. Graduate students in the M.S. program in chemistry are required 
to submit a research thesis. They may apply up to six hours of research credit toward the 
30-hour requirement. The remaining 24 hours of credit must be earned in the basic gradu- 
ate courses which reflect a diversified exposure to chemistry; no more than nine hours of 
200-level chemistry courses may be included; no more than 10 hours may be elected 
outside the department; and course work taken at the 300 to 400-level must include at 
least three, three credit-hour courses distributed in two of the three areas of chemistry 
outside the student's major area of research. Students are required to enroll in the de- 
partmental seminar program and are expected to attend special lectures and seminars 
offered by visiting scientists. A final oral examination is administered after completion 
and submission of the thesis. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The program for the degree of doctor of philosophy reflects a flexible, research-ori- 
ented approach geared to develop the interests, capability, and potential of students. A 
program of courses is recommended to suit individual needs based on background and 
ability. These courses are classified as basic graduate courses which present the essen- 
tials of a given discipline on an advanced level, and specialized graduate courses that 
take one to the frontiers in a specific area of research. The course offerings are designed 
to provide guidelines from which students can launch their independent studies in prepa- 
ration for candidacy examinations. Students are required to enroll in the departmental 
seminar program and are expected to attend special lectures and seminars offered by 
visiting scientists. 

Graduate students in the Ph.D. program are required to complete satisfactorily a mini- 
mum of three courses (three credits each) at the 300-400 course level, offered by the 
Department of Chemistry and distributed in two areas outside their major area of research. 
In addition, each major area in chemistry requires students in that area to enroll in basic 
graduate courses presenting the essentials of that discipline on an advanced level. 

Candidacy Candidacy examinations contain written and oral portions. The written ex- 
aminations are of the cumulative type, and are offered eight times a year. The oral ex- 
amination is based on a proposition for a research problem not intimately related to the 
student's own project, or any particular research project being actively pursued at WVU. 
This proposition is presented in writing to the student's research committee and 
defended before that group and any other interested faculty members. 



Chemistry 1 07 



Research 

Research, which is the major theme of graduate studies, may be initiated as early as 
the student and faculty feel appropriate for the individual. Normally, a student will begin 
laboratory work no later than the second semester. Upon successful completion of an 
original piece of research, the candidate will present results in a Ph.D. dissertation and at 
the appropriate time defend the work in a final oral examination. 

Chemistry (CHEM) 

201. Chemical Literature. 1.1 HR. PR: CHEM 134 and CHEM 141 or 246. Study of techniques for 
locating, utilizing, and compiling information needed by the research worker in chemistry. 1 HR. 
lee. 

202. Selected Topics. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Written consent and 2.0 CHEM GPA. Individual instruction 
under supervision of a faculty member. 

203. Undergraduate Seminar. II. 1 HR. PR: CHEM 201 . For B.S. chemistry majors, B.A. chemistry 
majors by consent. Instruction in design and presentation of topics of current chemical interest. 1 
HR. individual instruction and/or lecture. 

210. Instrumental Analysis. II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 115 and Physical Chemistry lectures and 
demonstations. Fundamentals of instrumental mehtods applies to chemical analyses: 
electrochemistry, spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chromatography. 2 HR. lee; 1 HR. 
demonstration. 

211. Intermediate Analytical Chemistry. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 115 and physical chemistry. Concepts 
underlying modern analytical procedures and their application to the solution of contemporary 
problems; presented at the intermediate level. 3 HR. lee. 

212. Environmental Chemistry II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 115, 134, and physical chemistry. Study of the 
nature, reactions, transport, and fates of chemical species in the environment. 2 HR. lee; 1 HR. 
demonstration. 

213. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 210. Practical application of modern 
instrumental methods to problems in chemical analysis. 3 HR. lab. 

214. Computer Methods in Analytical Chemistry. I. 1 HR. PR: CHEM 210; Cone: CHEM 213. 
Instruction in the use of data aquisition and data processing systems in the analytical chemistry 
lab. 3 HR. lab. 

222. Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry. I. 3 HR. PR: Physical chemistry. Structure, bonding, and 
reactivity of compounds of main-group and transition metal elements. Molecular structure and 
symmetry, solid state chemistry, ligand field theoory, and coordination chemistry. 3 HR. lee. 

223. Inorganic Synthesis Laboratory. II. 2 HR. PR: CHEM 222. Application of modern synthetic 
and spectroscopic methods of analysis to the preparation and characterization of main group, 
solid-state, transition metal, and organometallic compounds. Two 3 HR. lab. 

235. Methods of Sturcture Determination. I. 4 HR. PR: CHEM 134 and CHEM 136. Use of chemi- 
cal methods and UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy to elucidate structures of organic com- 
pounds. For students in chemistry and related fields who may need these methods in research 
and applied science. 2 HR. lee, two 3 HR. lab. 

237. Polymer Chemistry. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 134 and physical chemistry. Methods, mechanisms, 
and underlying theory of polymerization. Structure and stereochemistry of polymers in relation to 
chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. 3 HR. lee. 

239. Organic Syntheses. II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 134, 136. Modern synthetic methods of organic 
chemistry. 1 HR. lee, two 3 HR. lab. 

241. Chemical Crystallography. II. 3 HR. PR or Cone: Physical chemistry or consent. Applica- 
tions of X-ray detraction of crystals to the study of crystal and molecular structure. Includes 
theories of diffraction and crystallographic methods of analysis. 3 HR. lee 



1 08 WVU Graduate Catalog 



244. Colloid and Surface Chemistry. 11.3 HR. PR: Physical chemistry. Selected topics in the 
properties and physical chemistry of systems involving macromolecules, lyophobic colloids, and 
surfaces. 3 HR. lee. 

246. Physical Chemistry. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 134, MATH 16, and PHYS 12. A first course in 
physical chemistry. Topics include a study of thermodynamics and chemical equilibria. 3 HR. lee. 
(Students may not receive credit for CHEM 246 and for CHEM 141 .) 

247. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. II. 1 HR. PR: CHEM 18 or 115 and CHEM 246. Experimenta- 
tion illustrating the principles of physical chemistry and offering experience with chemical instru- 
mentation. One 3 HR. lab. 

248. Physical Chemistry. II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 246 and MATH 17. Continuation of CHEM 246. 
Chemical Dynamics and the structure of matter. 3 HR. lee. (Students may not receive credit for 
CHEM 248 and for CHEM 141.) 

249. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. I. 2 HR. PR: CHEM 246, 247. 248. Continuation of CHEM 
247. Two 3 HR. lab. 

250. Bonding & Molecular Structure. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 248. Introduction to the quantum theory 
of chemical bonding. Atomic structure, theoretical spectroscopy, predictions of molecular struc- 
tures, and bond properties. 3 HR. lee. 

314. Mass Spec. Principles and Practice. II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 210. Fundamental principles 
inderlying modern mass spectrometry. Gas phase chemmistry related to the formation and frag- 
mentation of ions. The design of instrumental systems for mass spectrometry. Application of mass 
spectrometric techniques to multidisciplinary problems of current interest. 3 HR. lee. 

321. Organometallic Chemistry. 3 HR. PR: Graduate standing in chemistry or consent. Synthe- 
ses, structure, and reactivity of organometallic comppounds. Applications of organometallic com- 
pounds to catalysis and organic synthesis. 3 HR. lee. 

331. Advanced Organic Chemistry 1. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 134. Structural concepts, bonding, 
tautomerism, static and dynamic stereochemistry, mechanistic classifications of reagents, and 
reactions including some applications. 3 HR. lee. 

332. Advanced Organic Chemistry 2. II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 331. Continuation of CHEM 331 with 
emphasis upon synthetic methods and reaction mechanisms. 3 HR. lee. 

341. Chemical Thermodynamics. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 248. Principles of classical and statistical 
thermodynamics and their application to chemical problems. 3 HR. lee. 

391 . Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

411. Seminar in Analytical Chemistry. I, II. 1 HR. per sem. Current literature and research. 

412. Seminar in Analytical Chemistry. I, II. 1 HR. per semester. Current literature and research. 

413. Electrochemistry & Instrumentn. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 210. Electronic instrumentation applied 
to study of mass transfer kinetics of electrode reactions, voltammetry, and high-frequency meth- 
ods. 3 HR. lee. 

414. Analyt. Atomic Spectrom. I. 3HR. PR: CHEM 250. Theory of atomic spectroscopy relevant to 
elemental analysis Considerations in the design and use of modern optical spectrometry sys- 
tems. 3 HR. lee. 

415. Chemical Separations. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 115, 133 and physical chemistry. Fundamentals of 
separate transport and flow transport processes underlying all separation techniques. Empirical 
coverage of chromatographic and electrophoretic mehtods for analytical separations. 3 HR. lee. 

417. Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry. I, II. 1 - 3 HR. per sem. Recent advances and topics 
of current interest, lec./discussion. 



Chemistry 109 



421. Seminar in Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. 1 HR. per sem. Current literature and research. 

422. Seminar in Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. 1 HR. per sem. Current literature and research. 

423. Phys. Methods in Inorganic Chemistry. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 222. Symmetry, vibrational spec- 
troscopy, theory and applications of NMR and EPR methods, magnetism, optical activity, dynamic 
processes, and fluxional behavior. 3 HR.lec 

424. Coordination Chemistry. II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 222. Symmetry, hybridization, ligand field theory, 
molecular orbital theory, metal-ligand bonding in coordination complexes and organometallics. 3 
HR. lee. 

425. Inorganic Reactions and Mechanisms. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 222. Inorganic reactions (ligand 
substitution aquation, organmetallic reactions, electron transfer); kinetics and mechanistic stud- 
ies. 3 HR. lee. 

427. Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. 1-3 HR. per sem. Recent advances and topics 
of current interest, lec./discussion. 

428. Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. I, II. 1-3 HR. per sem. Recent advances and topics 
of current interest, lec./discussion. 

431. Seminar in Organic Chemistry. I, II. 1 HR. per sem. Current literature and research. 

432. Seminar in Organic Chemistry. I, II. 1 HR. per sem. Current literature and research. 

433. Physical Organic Chemistry. II. 3 HR. PR: Chem 331. Theoretical considerations of organic 
molecules, kinetics and other methods used in the study of organic structure and reaction mecha- 
nisms, linear free energy relationship and other related topics. 3 HR. lee. 

437. Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry. I, II. 1-3 HR. per sem. Recent advances and topics 
of current interest. 

438. Advanced Topics in Organic Chemistry. I, II. 1-3 HR. per sem. Recent advances and topics 
of current interest. 

441. Seminar in Physical Chemistry. I, II. 1 HR. per sem. Current literature and research. 

442. Seminar in Physical Chemistry. I, II. 1 HR. per sem. Current literature and research. 

443. Chemical Kinetics. I. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 248. Theories and applications of kinetics in gaseous 
state and in solution. 3 HR. lee. 

444. Statistical Mechanics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 446. Theory and application of statistical 
mechanics to chemical systems. 3 HR. lee. (Offered on demand.) 

445. Theoretical Chemistry 1. 1 or II. 3 HR. PR: Differential equations. Theoretical background for 
quantum mechanics. 3 HR. lee. 

446. Theoretical Chemistry 2. 1 or II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 445. Theories and applications of quantum 
mechanics in chemistry. 3 HR. lee. (Offered on demand.) 

447. Molecular Spectrosc. & Structure. II. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 250 or graduate standing in chemis- 
try, or consent. Advanced applications of spectral methods to the study of molecular structure. 
3 HR. lee. 

448. Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry. I, II. 1-3 HR. per sem. Recent advances and topics 
of current interest. 

449. Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry. I, II. 1-3 HR. per sem. Recent advances and topics 
of current interest. 

489. Research Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. PR: Graduate student in chemistry. Research seminars by 
visiting lecturers. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

1 1 WVU Graduate Catalog 



491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced subjects which are 
not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Study may be independent or through specially sched- 
uled lectures. 

492. Directed Study. I, II. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking 
course work credit but who wish to meet residence requirements, use the University's faacilities, 
and participate in academic and cultural programs. 



Communication Studies 

Melanie Booth-Butterfield, Chairperson of the Department 

108 Armstrong Hall 

Degree Offered: Master of Arts 

The Department of Communication Studies offers work leading to the degree of 
Master of Arts, with a concentration in communication theory and research. Persons who 
possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university may be admitted to 
the program. Qualified graduate students from a variety of disciplines are admitted to the 
program. The master of arts degree program is intended to qualify the student to: 

• Assume a variety of professional roles in educational, industrial, governmental, or 
media institutions. 

• Teach the subject matter in high school and/or college. 

• Undertake advanced training toward a doctorate in the behavioral/social sciences. 

Requirements 

In addition to the general WVU requirements, the graduate student in communication 
studies must meet departmental requirements. These include successful completion of 
the minimum number of required graduate hours as set forth in Program A, B, or C, 
below with a grade of B or above in each class and the maintenance of a minimum 
grade-point average of 3.0. 

Classes graded "P", "S" or marked "CR" may not be counted toward a degree. 



Communication Studies 1 1 1 



Program A 

Applicants for admission must specify the program they wish to pursue. Program A is 
open only to full-time resident students. Programs B and C are open to both part-time 
and full-time students. 

All students planning to continue graduate study past the M.A. level are encouraged to 
enter Program A. The following are required: 

• At least 36 hours of graduate credit, 30 of which must be in the Department of 
Communication Studies. A maximum of six hours of thesis credit will be allowed. 

• Completion of COMM 401 and 420. 

• A thesis. 

• An oral examination on the thesis. 

Program B 

All students planning a professional career in a field other than education are encour- 
aged to enter this program. This is normally a terminal degree program in communica- 
tion studies. The following are required: 

• A minimum of 36 hours of course work with at least 30 hours in the Department of 
Communication Studies: 

• Successful completion of written and oral comprehensive examinations. 

The oral examination may be waived with the approval of the student's examination 
committee and the departmental coordinator of graduate studies. 

Students who wish to prepare themselves to be more effective professional communi- 
cators but who may not wish to complete program B may obtain a certificate in corporate 
and organizational communication by completing 15 specified hours in this program. 
Three courses are required: COMM 491 -A Applied Communication Theory, COMM 491- 
B Nonverbal Communication in the Organizational Environment, and COMM 376 Theory 
and Research in Organizational Communication. Six hours of electives may be chosen 
from COMM 370, 373, 374, and 377. 

Program C 

All students planning a professional career in elementary or secondary education are 
encouraged to enter this program. This is normally a terminal degree program in commu- 
nication studies. Students may complete this program through off-campus study, on- 
campus study, or a combination. The following are required: 

• A minimum of 33 hours of course work with at least 27 hours in the Department of 
Communication Studies including COMM 361, 362, 363, and 378. 

• Successful completion of written and oral comprehensive examinations. 

The oral examination may be waived with the approval of the student's examination 
committee and the departmental coordinator of graduate studies. 

Communication Studies (COMM) 

201. Principles of Communication Education. I, II. 3 HR. PR: 15 hr communication studies. Litera- 
ture, principles, and current practices of communication education in public schools with directed 
application. Intended for teachers in communication and language arts. 

206. Advanced Study in Nonverbal Communication. I, II. 3 HR. PR: COMM 106. Functions of 
nonverbal communication including status, power, immediacy, relationship development, regula- 
tion, turn-taking, leakage and deception, tuition, person perception, and emotional expressions. 

221. Persuasion. I, II. 3 HR. Theory and research in persuasion, emphasizing a critical under- 
standing and working knowledge of the effects of social communication on attitudes, beliefs, and 
behavior. 

230. Survey of Rhetorical-Communication Theory. I, II. 3 HR. A survey of theory in the rhetorical 
communication context with emphasis upon periods preceding the twentieth century. 

1 1 2 WVU Graduate Catalog 



231. Communication and Symbol Analysis. I, II. 3 HR. PR: COMM 131. Advanced study of lan- 
guage in communication. Specific attention to conversational analysis. 

361 . Communication in the Classroom. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: Teaching experience or consent. Role of 
interpersonal communication in classroom environment, with particular emphasis on communica- 
tion between students and teachers. Recommended for elementary, secondary, and college teach- 
ers in all fields. 

362. Nonverbal Communication in the Classroom. I, II, S. 3 HR. Impact of nonverbal communica- 
tion behaviors of students and teachers on teacher-student interaction and student learning. Rec- 
ommended for elementary, secondary, and college teachers in all fields. 

363. Communication in the Educational Organization. I, II, S. 3 HR. Problems of communication 
within educational organizations with emphasis on elements that impact educational change, conflict 
management, and interpersonal influence. Recommended for elementary, secondary, and col- 
lege teachers in all fields. 

364. Communication Problems of Children. I, II, S. 3 Hr (Primarily for elementary and secondary 
school teachers and language arts supervisors.) Normal maturational development of listening 
and speaking skills, their relationships to language acquisition, and influence upon achievement. 

365. Media in Communication and Education. I, II, S. 3 HR. Use of the media in educational and 
other communication environments with emphasis on communication processes and principles 
relevant to television and film. 

370. Interpersonal Communication: Theory and Research. I, II, S. 3 HR. Survey of the theory and 
research in dyadic interpersonal communication. Emphasis upon relational communication and 
intimate communication in interpersonal relationships. 

371. Theory and Research in Language. 3 HR. Study of verbal interactions and language from 
source and receive perspectives. 

372. Theory and Research in Mass Communication. I, II. 3 HR. Mass communication from a 
consumer's viewpoint. Use of consumer-oriented mass media research also stressed. 

373. Theory and Research in Persuasion. I, II, S. 3 HR. Various theories and principles of persua- 
sion with emphasis on contemporary research literature. 

374. Intercultural Communication: Theory and Research. 3 HR. Advanced seminar in communi- 
cation of various cultures. Special emphasis on research in diffusion of innovations. 

375. Communication Apprehension and Avoidance. 3 HR. Theory and research related to indi- 
viduals' predispositional and situational tendencies to approach or avoid communication. Empha- 
sis on work in the areas of willingness to communicate, communication apprehension, reticence, 
and shyness. 

376. Theory and Research in Organizational Communication. I, II. 3 HR. Contemporary research 
linking communication variables and networks to organizational change, effectiveness, leader- 
ship, power, and management practices. Analysis of communication problems within a variety of 
organizations. 

377. Small Group Theory and Practice. I, II, S. 3 HR. Specific research areas in interpersonal 
communication with emphasis on small groups. 

378. Comm and Affect in Instruction. II. 3 HR. PR: Graduate Status. This advanced graduate 
course addresses how communication of affect from the perspective of both instructor and stu- 
dents influences of classroom learning. 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in 
regularly scheduled courses. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities leading to a thesis, problem report, 
research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 



Communication Studies 1 1 3 



401. Introduction to Graduate Study in Human Communication. I. 3 HR. Major emphasis on de- 
signing and conducting experimental and laboratory research in human communication. Com- 
puter applications to social science research also given consideration. Should be taken the first 
semester of graduate study. 

402. Advanced Seminar in Research Methods. II. 3 HR. PR: COMM 401 . Research techniques nec- 
essary to conduct original communication research. Emphasis on advanced statistical techniques. 

420. Survey of Human Communication Theory. I. 3 HR. Broad overview of contemporary theories 
in human communication. Should be taken the first semester of graduate study. 

433. Special Topics. I, II, S. 3-12 HR. PR: Consent. Thorough study of special topics in human 
communication including interpersonal and small group, language, intercultural, organizational, 
persuasion, and mass communication, nonverbal communication, and communication education. 

475. Independent Study. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Open to graduate students pursuing inde- 
pendent study in communication. 

486. Seminar in Human Communication. I, II, S. 3-9 HR. Current problems and research in hu- 
man communication. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. (Open only to graduate assistants in the 
Department of Communication Studies.) Supervised experience in classroom teaching. 

491 . Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1 -6 HR. Advanced study in a variety of areas in human communica- 
tion. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. Directed study, reading, and/or research. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments 
in the field. 

493A. Special Topics. 1 -6 HR. A study of contemporary topics selected from recent developments 
in the field. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate students. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



English 

Patrick W. Conner, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department 

Timothy Sweet, Ph.D. Supervisor 

Elaine Ginsberg, M.A. Supervisor 

Stansbury Hall 

Degrees Offered: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy 

To be admitted to the Department of English as prospective candidates for the degree 
of Master of Arts, students are expected to have completed work comparable to the 
department's undergraduate requirement for English majors (but with records distinctly 
above the average), and to present as part of their applications their scores on the Gra- 
duate Record Examination General Aptitude Test, and, if nonnative speakers of English, 
their TOEFL scores. Past experience has shown that successful graduate students 
usually score at least the 60th percentile on the verbal section of the GRE. 



1 1 4 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Master of Arts 

Admission The applicant may be admitted as a regular graduate student — one who is 
approved for a degree program; more rarely as a provisional graduate student — one 
who is accepted for study but at the time of acceptance does not meet all the require- 
ments for regular admission; or as a non-degree graduate student. (The GRE and TOEFL 
scores are not required of non-degree graduate students.) 

Course Requirements (No Thesis) M.A. students selecting the non-thesis option must 
successfully complete 30 hours, distributed as follows: nine hours of core courses; nine 
hours of author, topic, genre courses; nine hours of seminar courses (including ENGL 
492); and three hours of unrestricted course work. No more than six hours of course 
work outside the Department of English can apply toward the 30-hour requirement. Stu- 
dents should check with the department about the most current courses available. 

Course Requirements and Thesis A candidate for the M.A. degree may choose to take 
24 hours of course work and write a thesis, for six hours credit, under the supervision of a 
thesis advisor. The thesis may be creative (a novel or a collection of short stories, poems, 
or literary essays with an analytic introduction) or scholarly. A candidate may register for up 
to 12 hours of thesis credit, but only six hours can be included in the 30 hours required for 
the degree. Thesis hours are graded as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). 

Students electing the thesis option are expected to defend their finished work before 
their thesis committees and any others who wish to attend the oral examination. The 
English Department requires no terminal examination. Instead, course distribution re- 
quirements and individual courses provide rigor and breadth, and only classes passed 
with a grade of B or better count toward the degree. 

Language Requirement Two options are available for fulfilling the foreign language 
requirement. In the first option, students may take a graduate reading examination ad- 
ministered by the Department of Foreign Languages in French, German, classical Greek, 
Italian, Latin, Russian, or Spanish. In the alternative option, students may fulfill the lan- 
guage requirement by having successfully completed (with receipt of a grade of A or B in 
the last course) a second-year level of foreign language study at an accredited college or 
university (or its international equivalent) within the last five years. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Admission Applicants for admission to the program will be judged on the bases of 
academic record, three recommendations from former teachers, a statement of purpose 
outlining their academic and professional goals, a sample of their academic writing, and 
the Graduate Record Examination Advanced Test scores. Nonnative English-speaking 
applicants must also present their TOEFL scores. All decisions on admission are made 
by the Ph.D. admissions committee. 

Examinations and Requirements The doctoral program can be completed in three 
years of full-time study beyond the master's degree or its equivalent. During the first year 
in residence, students must enroll in English 499 Graduate Colloquium, and pass the 
qualifying examination. Thirty credit-hours must be taken prior to the examination for 
formal admission to candidacy. Full-time students are expected to enroll in nine credit- 
hours per semester. Only 300- and 400-level courses can be applied to the 30 credit- 
hours requirement; nine of these hours must be in 400-level seminars, one of which must 
be English 488 Current Directions in Literary Stud/. All doctoral candidates, unless they 



English 1 1 5 



have previously taken an equivalent course, must take English 492 Introduction to Liter- 
ary Research. Neither English 490 (required of all teaching assistants) nor English 492 
may be substituted for the seminar requirements. Doctoral students must teach suc- 
cessfully in the department. Concurrent with the teaching practicum, six hours of teach- 
ing practicum (three for teaching composition and three for teaching literature) are also 
required. This requirement can be waived for those candidates with teaching experience 
approved by the department. Students are permitted only six hours of independent study, 
however. The dissertation carries 12 hours; thus, the typical Ph.D. program includes 48 
credit hours. 

Upon approval by the plan of study committee, students may choose to complete a 
minor, not to exceed 1 2 hours in 300- or 400-level courses, in a related subject offered by 
another department. 

Language Requirement The foreign language options are the same as for the master's 
program and must be completed prior to taking the examination for formal admission to 
candidacy. 

Doctoral Dissertation After completing course work, passing the examination for for- 
mal admission to candidacy, and fulfilling the language and teaching requirements, the 
student, under the direction of the dissertation committee chairperson, writes a prospec- 
tus of the final project. The dissertation, meant to be an original contribution to scholar- 
ship in its field, should be able to be completed in one year. 

The final examination (oral defense of the dissertation) is scheduled by the disserta- 
tion director and is open to the public. 

Core Courses 

301. The Graduate Writing Workshop 

310. Old English 1 

312. Medieval Literature 

313. Renaissance Literature 

314. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature 

315. Romantic Literature 

316. Victorian Literature 

317. Twentieth-Century British Literature 

320. Studies in Composition and Rhetoric 
350. Shakespeare 

370. American Literature to 1865 

371 . American Literature, 1865 to 1915 

372. American Literature, 1915 to Present 
383. Recent Literary Criticism 

Author, Topic, Genre Courses 

311. OldEnglish2 

321 . Studies in Drama 

322. Studies in Poetry 

323. Studies in the Novel 

324. Studies in Nonfiction Prose 

325. Study of Selected Authors 
392. Special Topics 



1 1 6 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Seminars 

440. Seminar in Medieval Studies 

446. Seminar in Renaissance Studies, 1550-1660 

460. Seminar in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Studies 

470. Seminar in British Romanticism 

476. Seminar in Victorian Studies 

484. Seminar in American Studies 

485. Seminar in Twentieth-Century British Studies 
488. Current Directions in Literary Study 

492. Introduction to Literary Research 

493. Folger Institute Seminar 

494. Seminar 

499. Graduate Colloquium 

English (ENGL) 

201. Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Grade of "B" or higher in ENGL 114. 
Advanced workshop in creative writing for students seriously engaged in writing fiction. 

202. Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Grade of "B" or higher in ENGL 115. 
Advanced workshop in creative writing for students seriously engaged in the writing of a major 
group of poems. 

203. Creative Writing Workshop: Non-Fiction. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Grade of B or better in ENGL 114 or 
ENGL 1 1 5 or ENGL 1 1 6. Advanced workshop in creative writing for students seriously engaged in 
the writing of nonfiction. 

208. Scientific and Technical Writing. I, II. 3 HR. PR: ENGL 1 and 2. Writing for the scientific and 
technical professions. Description of a process and a complex idea; feasibility report; analysis of 
a technological innovation; communications; articles for trade and research journals. 

210. Structure of the English Language. I, II. 3 HR. Historical, comparative, and descriptive gram- 
mar, together with an introduction to English linguistics. 

211. History of the English Language. I, II. 3HR. Study of the nature of the language; questions of 
origins, language families, development, relationships of English as one of the Indo-European 
languages. 

220. American Poetry. I, II. 3 HR. Major American poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

223. Modern American Poetics. I, II. 3 HR. A close study of those poets who have shaped the 
aesthetics of contemporary American poetry. 

232. Literary Criticism. I, II. 3 HR. Literary criticism from Aristotle to modern times. 

235. American Drama. I, II. 3 HR. Representative American dramas and history of theatre in 
America. 

236. Tragedy I, II. 3 HR. Masterpieces of tragedy from Greek times to modern, with consideration 
of changing concepts of tragedy and of ethical and ideological values reflected in works of major 
tragic authors. 

240. Folk Literature. I, II. 3 HR. The folk ballad, its origin, history, and literary significance, based 
on Child's collection and on American ballad collections. 

241 . Folk Literature of the Southern Appalachian Region. I, II. 3 HR. Traditional literature of the 
southern Appalachian region, including songs, prose, tales, languages, customs, based on mate- 
rial collected in the region— especially in West Virginia. 

245. Studies in Appalachian Literature. I, II. S. 3 HR. Studies of authors, genres, themes, or topics 
in Appalachian literature. 



English 117 



250. Shakespeare's Art. I, II, S. (Alt. yrs.) 3 HR. Special studies in Shakespeare's tragedies, 
comedies, and/or history plays, with some attention given to his non-dramatic poetry. With em- 
phases varying from year to year, studies may include textual, historical, critical, and dramaturgi- 
cal-theatrical approaches. 

255. Chaucer. I, II. 3 HR. Early poems, Troilus and Criseyde, and The Canterbury Tales. In addi- 
tion to an understanding and appreciation of Chaucer's works, the student is expected to acquire 
an adequate knowledge of Chaucer's language. 

256. Milton. I, II. 3 HR. All of Milton's poems and a few selected prose works. 

261 . Sixteenth Century Prose and Poetry. I, II. 3 HR. Studies from Caxton to Bacon, from Skelton 
to Shakespeare. 

262. Seventeenth Century Prose and Poetry. I, II. 3 HR. Studies from Donne to Dryden. 

263. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. I, II. 3 HR. Literature of the period 1660-1744 in relation 
to social, political, and religious movements of the time. 

264. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. I, II. 3 HR. Continuation of ENGL 263, covering the 
latter half of the century. May be taken independently of ENGL 263. 

265. The Romantic Movement. I, II. 3 HR. A survey of the works of the major British Romantic 
writers along with an introduction to works of scholarship in British Romanticism. 

266. American Romanticism. I, II. 3 HR. Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, 
and Nathaniel Hawthorne. A study of relations of these men to the history of their own time; their 
contributions to American thought and art. 

267. Victorian Poetry. I, II. 3 HR. Major Victorian poets-Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Rossetti, 
Morris, Swinburne, Fitzgerald-and a few of the later Victorian poets. 

268. British and Irish Poetry From the late 19th Century to the Present. I, II. 3 HR. Representative 
poets studied include Yeats, Eliot, Auden, Hughes, Heaney, Hill, and Boland. 

271 . Topics in Creative Writing. II. 3 Hrs. PR: Consent. (May be repeated for a maximum of 9 Hrs.) 
Advanced work in creative writing; course content changes with genre: fiction, poetry, non-fiction. 

273. Creative Writing Seminar. I. 3 HR. PR: 9 hours of creative writing and consent. Individual 
projects in creative writing pursued in a workshop setting. 

280. Southern Writers. I, II. 3 HR. Twentieth-century Southern essayists, poets, short-story writ- 
ers and novelist in relation to ideological background. 

283. Study of Selected Authors. I, II. 3 HR. (May be repeated with a change in course content for 
a maximum of 9 credit hours.) Study of the works of one or more major authors. 

288. Women writers in England and America. I, II. 3 HR. Syllabus may vary from year to year to 
include women writers in a particular courtry, historical period, or genre; or writing on a particular 
theme. 

290. Independent Study I, II. 1-3 HR. (With departmental consent, may be repeated for a maxi- 
mum of 9 credit hours.) PR: Departmental consent. Individual study of literary, linguistic, and 
writing problems. 

293. Practicum in Teaching Composition. I. 1 HR. Designed to give prospective English and lan- 
guage arts teachers supervised practical experiences in individual writing tutorials. 

294. Fiction for Adolescents. II. 3 HR. Designed for prospective teachers of English and language 
arts. Course focuses on recent fiction for adolescents as well as on traditional literature appropri- 
ate to the needs, interests, and abilities of youth. Evaluative criteria emphasized. 

295. Approaches to Teaching Composition. I. 3 HR. PR: ENGL 108. CONC: ENGL 293. (May not 
be taken for both undergraduate and graduate credit.) Surveys attitudes toward and techniques 
of teaching writing in elementary and secondary schools. Provides experiment in class with meth- 
ods of teaching writing. 

1 1 8 WVU Graduate Catalog 



301 . Graduate Writing Workshop. I, II. 3 HR. (With departmental consent, may be repeated for a 
maximum of 6 credit hours.) Advanced workshop in creative writing. Genre and focus varies from 
semester to semester. PR: Instructor consent. 

310. Old English 1. I, II. 3 HR. Study of Anglo-Saxon with selected readings from the literature of 
the period. 

311. Old English 2. I, II. 3 HR. PR: ENGL 310. Beowulf and other texts in Old English. 

312. Medieval Literature. 3 HR. Readings in the literature of the Medieval period; attention to 
major writers and genres; focus on literary theory. 3 HR. lee. 

313. Renaissance Literature. 3 HR. Readings in the literature of the English Renaissance; atten- 
tion to major writers and genres; focus on literary history. 3 HR. lee. 

314. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature. 3 HR. Readings in the literature of England 
during the Restoration and the eighteenth century; attention to major writers and genres; focus on 
literary history. 3 HR. lee. 

315. Romantic Literature. 3 HR. Readings in the literature of England during the romantic period; 
attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history. 3 HR. lee. 

316. Victorian Literature. 3 HR. Readings in the literature of England during the Victorian period; 
attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history. 3 HR. lee. 

317. Twentieth-Century British Literature. 3 HR. Readings on the literature of England during the 
twentieth century; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history. 3 HR. lee. 

320. Studies in Composition and Rhetoric. 3 HR. Integration of theory with pedagogy for effective 
instruction, composition and rhetoric. Historical development of composition theory and current 
issues in rhetoric. 3 HR. lee. 

321 . Studies in Drama. 3 HR. Advanced study in the genre of drama, with emphasis varying from 
year to year. Course may include textual, historical, critical, formalist, and/or theoretical study. Not 
restricted to any one period or century. 

322. Studies in Poetry. 3 HR. Advanced study in genre of poetry, with emphasis varying from year 
to year. Course may include textual, historical, critical, formalist, and/or theoretical study. Not 
restricted to any one period or century. 

323. Studies in the Novel. 3 HR. Advanced study in the genre of the novel, with emphasis varying 
from year to year. Course may include textual, historical, critical, formalist, and/or theoretical 
study. Not restricted to any one period or century. 

324. Studies in Nonfiction Prose. 3 HR. Advanced study in the genre of nonfiction, with emphasis 
varying from year to year. Course may include textual, historical, critical, formalist, and/or theo- 
retical study. Not restricted to any one period or century. 

325. Study of Selected Authors. 3 HR. Advanced study of one or more major authors. 

350. Shakespeare. I, II. 3 HR. Intensive study of selected plays. Special attention to textual 
problems and to language and poetic imagery, together with the history of Shakespearean criti- 
cism and scholarship. 

370. American Literature to 1865. 3 HR. Readings in the literature of America from its beginnings 
to 1865; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history. 

371. American Literature, 1865-1915. 3 HR. Readings in the literature of America from 1865- 
1915; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history. 

372. American Literature, 1915-Present. 3 HR. Readings in the literature of America from 1915 to 
the present; attention to major writers and genres; focus on literary history. 

383. Recent Literary Criticism. 3 HR. Brief survey of theories of major schools of recent criticism 
and an application of these theories to selected literary works. 



English 1 1 9 



391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

392. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-9 HR. Advanced study of special topics in language, literature, or 
writing. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

400. Thesis. I, II. 3 HR. 

401. Thesis. I, II. 3 HR. 

440. Seminar in Medieval Studies. I, II. 3 HR. Topics from English literature, 1100-1500. 

446. Seminar in Renaissance Studies, 1550-1660. I, II. 3 HR. Studies in major authors and spe- 
cial topics in the Renaissance. 

460. Seminar in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Studies. I, II. 3 HR. 

470. Seminar in British Romanticism. I, II. 3 HR. Studies in major authors and special topics in the 
field of British Romanticism. 

476. Seminar in Victorian Studies. I, II. 3 HR. Research and discussion in selected topics in the 
literature and history of the period. 

484. Seminar in American Studies. I, II. 3 HR. Seminar in principal authors and movements in 
American literature. 

485. Seminar in Twentieth-Century British Studies. I, II. 3 HR. Seminar in principal authors and 
movements in twentieth-century British literature. 

488. Current Directions in Literary Study. II. 3 HR. PR: Advanced graduate standing (English 383 
recommended). Intensive study of one or more current approaches to literature and theories of 
criticism, with some emphasis on the interrelations of literary study with other disciplines. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. Supervised practice in college teaching of expository 
writing. Il-Supervised practice in college teaching of literature. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II. 1-6 HR. Specific topics approved by the instructor. 

492. Introduction to Literary Research. I, II. 1-6 HR. Bibliography; materials and tools of literary 
investigations; methods of research in various fields of literary history and interpretation; problem 
of editing. Practical guidance in the writing of theses. 

493. Special Topics. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Graduate standing. (Enrollment is by special application 
only. Contact department chairperson for information.) Seminar conducted by distinguished scholars 
and held at the Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth Century Studies in Washington, 
D.C. Topics vary. (Also listed as HIST 493.) 

494. Special Seminar. I, II. 1-6 HR. Specific authors to be approved by instructors. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. I, II. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. 

498. Doctoral Thesis. I, II. 2-4 HR. PR: Consent. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Credit for this course may not be applied 
toward satisfaction of the 30-hour degree requirements at either the master's or doctoral level. 



1 20 WVU Graduate Catalog 






Foreign Languages 

Frank W. Medley, Jr., Chairperson of the Department 

205-B Chitwood Hall 
Jeffrey Bruner, Graduate Coordinator 

216 Chitwood Hall 
Degree Offered: Master of Arts 

The Department of Foreign Languages offers the degree of Master of Arts with 
emphasis in the following areas: French, German, Spanish, TESOL, Linguistics, and 
Comparative Literature. The degree is intended for those students who seek more 
specialized knowledge in order to teach in their chosen area, and it serves as the 
basis for doctoral study. The graduate program in Foreign Languages seeks to 
prepare students for both options by offering courses in language teaching method- 
ology and applied linguistics as well as in theoretical linguistics, literary criticism, 
and literature and culture. Students also have opportunity to engage in research 
projects that reflect their interests within a given subject and which serve to com- 
plement and augment the information imparted through in-class activities. 

There is a limited number of Graduate Teaching Assistantships (primarily in ESL, French, 
German, and Spanish, and occasionally in Chinese, Japanese, Linguistics, and 
Russian) available to help defray the cost of graduate study. The assistantships carry full 
tuition remission and a nine-month stipend (August-May); there are also opportunities to 
teach during the university's summer sessions. Assistantships are awarded annually to 
those students who have potential to become effective teachers. 

In addition to graduate teaching assistantships, limited financial aid is available to 
graduate students in the Department on a competitive basis. For information on stipends, 
contact the Department chair. A limited number of meritorious tuition waiver awards are 
sometimes available from the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences through the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Languages; these awards are based on academic performance and 
financial need. (Recipients of tuition awards who will be enrolling for fewer hours than 
those paid for in their award must notify the Department immediately. Failure to do so will 
result in disqualification for future tuition waivers.) 

Advisory Committee 

To be admitted to the graduate program, a student is expected to have an undergradu- 
ate degree in the desired area of study (or an acceptable related area) with a GPA of 3.00 
(overall as well as within the major). The student must complete the university admis- 
sion application, including payment of the required fee, and the departmental application 
form, which includes a 300-word "statement of purpose." 

All international students whose native language is not English must demonstrate pro- 
ficiency in English by scoring a minimum of 550 on the TOEFL in order to be admitted to 
the University. IMPORTANT NOTE: International students whose native language is not 
English applying to study TESOL (or a TESOL combination) must score a minimum of 
580 on the TOEFL in order to concentrate in that area of study. 

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required of all applicants. 

To be considered for a Graduate Teaching Assistantship (GTA), the student must com- 
plete the GTA Application form and submit a writing sample and a cassette tape, both in 
the language to which the student is applying. In addition, the student must have three 
letters of recommendation forwarded by the writers to the Department of Foreign 
Languages. NOTE: Consideration for a GTA is contingent upon admission to the gra- 
duate program. 



Foreign Languages 121 



All necessary forms may be obtained from the Department of Foreign Languages. No 
applications will be processed until the file is complete. 

General Academic Information 

Advising 

All graduate students will have a primary advisor (usually assigned by the chair when 
the student is accepted into the program). Students should consult with their advisor 
when they register for, or need to add or drop, courses. In addition, the Graduate Pro- 
gram Coordinator is available to answer questions regarding the degree program, re- 
quirements, comprehensive examinations, graduation, etc. Students may consult with 
the Chairperson regarding departmental matters. 

International students 

International students studying in the Department on an F-l visa should remember 
that they are required to carry a minimum course load of 9 hours each semester (ex- 
cluding the summer) in order to maintain their legal status for their visa. International 
students who may be forced to withdraw from a course and thus fall below 9 hours in 
any semester, must first check with the Department Chair or Associate Chair and also 
speak with the International Student Office in E. Moore Hall. 

Students graduating from the program who wish to receive a Practical Training Visa 
must apply for it within 60 days before or after graduation. See the International 
Student Office for necessary application papers and any possible changes in policy. 

Academic Requirements 

General 

A minimum of 36 credit hours at the graduate level, of which 24 hours of course work 
must be taken within the Department (exclusive of 391 — "Advanced Topics" and 397 — 
"Master's Degree Research"). In addition, no more than 12 hours of course work done 
at the 200 level will be counted toward the degree. 

No more than three hours of independent study will be applied to the degree, unless 
approved by the departmental Chairperson. NOTE: Independent studies will be permit- 
ted only in special circumstances; in most instances students must enroll in the regu- 
larly scheduled courses. 

No courses for the degree may be taken Pass/Fail. 

No more than 6 hours of thesis research credits (397) can be applied to the 
degree. 

A 3.00 GPA is required for graduation. 

All requirements for the Master's degree must be completed within 8 years of the 
student's initial matriculation. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

Students in French, Spanish, or German (that is, those who are not native speakers 
of the language of study) must demonstrate proficiency in that language by passing the 
departmental foreign language examination prior to graduation. 

Native speakers of English in TESOL, Linguistics, Comparative Literature, or a TESOL 
combination, must demonstrate proficiency in a second language prior to graduation. 
This may be done by 1) passing the departmental foreign language exam, or 2) com- 
pleting four semesters of a foreign language with a minimum GPA of 3.00; in this case, 
the courses must be taken during the student's course of studies. 



1 22 WVU Graduate Catalog 






Native speakers of English in TESOL or a TESOL combination must take the English 
Grammar Examination during their first semester; those students who do not pass this 
examination must complete "The Grammar of English" course (ENGL 392) at their ear- 
liest opportunity. (NOTE: This course does not count toward the 36 hours required for 
graduation.) 

International students whose native language is not English are considered to have 
satisfied the Foreign Language requirement upon admission by virtue of their TOEFL 
score. 

Research Requirement 

Students are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out research and to write at 
a level appropriate to the Master's degree. They may satisfy this requirement in one of 
the following ways: 

Successful completion of Bibliography and Research 365 (3 hrs). 

Presentation of an acceptable master's thesis (6 hrs). 

Grade of "A" in a 397 course— Master's Degree Research (3 hrs). 

Areas of Emphasis 

Students must sign a formal "Plan of Study" (available in 205 Chitwood) as soon as 
possible during their first semester of graduate work. This document lists the require- 
ments within the individual areas of emphasis, and it is the students' responsibility to 
fulfill these requirements. (A student can change her/his area of emphasis prior to the 
semester s/he intends to graduate. Please note, however, that teaching assistantships 
are awarded on the basis of the students' area of emphasis, and a change may affect 
reappointment.) The specific requirements for each area of emphasis are listed below. 

French 

Linguistics 247 Structure of Modern French or 

Linguistics 341 History of the French Language 
French 217 French Culture or 

French 392 French Civilization 
French 344 Explication de Textes or 

French 326 Literary Criticism 
Four courses, minimum, in French literature 

German 

German 211 German Culture since 1945 
Linguistics 257 Structure of German or 

Linguistics 351 History of the German Language 
Four courses, minimum, in German literature 

Spanish 

Linguistics 217 Structure of Spanish or 

Linguistics 311 History of Spanish 
Spanish 324 Explicacion de Textos 
Spanish 316 Spanish Culture or 

Spanish 392 Spanish American Culture 
Four courses, minimum, in Hispanic literature 



Foreign Languages 1 23 



TESOL 

Language 321 ESL Methods 
Language 341 ESL Theory 
Linguistics 202 Phonology 
Linguistics 330 ESL Linguistics 
ESL 380 American Culture 

Four courses from the following list: 



Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 
Engl 



sh 21 1 History of the English Lang 

sh 322 Studies in Poetry* 

sh 220 American Poetry 

sh 323 Studies in the Novel* 

sh 235 American Drama 

sh 324 Studies in N on fiction Prose 

sh 245 Studies in Appalachian Lit. 

sh 325 Studies of Selected Authors* 

sh 266 American Romanticism 

sh 370 American Literature to 1865 

sh 280 Southern Writers 

sh 371 American Lit, 1865-1915 

sh 292 Special Topics* 

sh 372 American Lit, 1915 to present 

sh 294 Fiction for Adolescents 

sh 392 19th-C. American Literature 

sh 321 Studies in Drama* 

sh 392 20th-C. American Literature 



(*lf authors are American) 

Linguistics 

Linguistics 202 Phonology 
Linguistics 302 Advanced Phonology 
Linguistics 283 Transformational Grammar 
Linguistics 383 Advanced Transformational Syntax 
Two additional courses, minimum, in Linguistics 
One culture course 

Four additional courses in literature, linguistics, or any combination thereof, beyond 
the minimum linguistics requirement. 

Comparative Literature 

Seven courses in literature (of which five must be within the Department) 

FLIT 369 Comparative Literature: Theory and Practice 

One culture course 

One of the following: 

English 211 History of English 

Linguistics 31 3 Old Spanish 

English 310 Old English (Anglo Saxon) 

Linguistics 341 History of French 

English 311 Old English (Beowulf) 

Linguistics 343 Old French 

Linguistics 311 History of Spanish 

Linguistics 351 History of German 

Linguistics 353 Middle High German 

1 24 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Combined areas 

Students may also combine two areas, and two of the most common combinations 
involve TESOL and a second language or linguistics. 

The TESOL/Language plan of study must include at least one linguistics course from 
the TESOL program, one linguistics course in the language, five literature courses (three 
in one language/two in the other), and a culture course (either American culture or a 
culture course within the language area). 

The TESOL/Linguistics plan of study must include ESL Methods, ESL Theory, ESL 
Linguistics, Phonology, three additional linguistics courses, American Culture, and 
four American literature courses. One of the following can substitute for a literature 
course and may double count as a linguistics requirement: Linguistics 311 , Linguis- 
tics 313, Linguistics 341 , Linguistics 351 , Linguistics 353, English 211, English 31 0, 
English 311. 

Students may petition for a plan of study which is not described above but which falls 
within the general guidelines and includes at least one linguistics course, one culture 
course, and four literature courses. The petition must include justification for the combi- 
nation and a detailed description of the proposed course work. The petition must be 
submitted to the Graduate Coordinator and approved by the Graduate Coordinator, the 
Chair, and the Dean. 

Information for Graduate Teaching Assistants 

The Department values the contributions made by our graduate assistants and strives 
to help them become effective teachers. All graduate assistants work under the super- 
vision of a coordinator. The coordinator will conduct orientations and organizational 
meetings with graduate assistants and provide course materials (such as syllabi). In 
addition, the coordinator will periodically observe individual classes in order to assess 
the graduate assistants' performance and to provide encouragement and assistance. 

Requirements and responsibilities 

Graduate assistants normally teach two courses (six class hours per week), although 
IEP assistants normally teach nine class hours per week. Graduate assistants are 
uniquely responsible their courses (including evaluating their students' work). 

All graduate assistants must register for a LANG 421 (LANG 321 for TESOL stu- 
dents) during their first semester. In addition, graduate assistants must register for LANG 
490 each semester of employment ; please note that this course does not count toward 
the degree. 

Students who will be teaching English, French, German, or Spanish must take a test 
in that language (unless they have previously demonstrated an acceptable level of 
knowledge of the grammar of the language). If the results are below the acceptable 
level, they will be required to enroll in an appropriate language course; this course is 
deemed a deficiency course and does not count toward the degree. 

If a graduate student is teaching in a language area different from her/his area of 
emphasis (and does not hold a master's degree in the language), s/he must register for 
at least one graduate-level course, per year, in that language. 

Students who have already received an M.A. in Foreign Languages from West 
Virginia University are ineligible for an assistantship in this Department. 

The responsibilities of the graduate assistant include: 

• Prompt attendance at all required meetings. 

• Maintaining full-time student status (minimum 9 hours per semester.) 

• At least 6 hours, per semester, must be at the graduate level. 

• No more than 3 hours, per semester, may be taken outside the Department with- 
out consent. 

Foreign Languages 1 25 



• Maintaining a minimum grade-point average of 3.00 each semester. 

Please remember that the graduate teaching assistantship is a privilege and must be 
renewed yearly. If a graduate assistant is found to be negligent in any area, his/her 
assistantship will not be renewed. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

The comprehensive examinations are intended to evaluate a student's knowledge, 
including the ability to synthesize and evaluate ideas, in her/his area of emphasis. The 
examinations are based on standardized reading lists (available in 205 Chitwood). Al- 
though some of the works may be covered in course work, independent research will 
be necessary. 

Students must take the comprehensive examinations the semester they intend to 
graduate. Prior to that, each student must select an examination committee. This com- 
mittee is comprised of at least three professors from the student's area of emphasis, 
one of whom will act as the committee chair; the chair must be a regular member of the 
graduate faculty (see appendix). The student will meet with her/his committee in order 
to select the content areas of the examinations. The committee is responsible for pre- 
paring and grading the student's examination. 

The comprehensive examinations will be administered on a Saturday around the 
1 0th week of the semester and is divided into three 2-hour periods. At least two of the 
sections are to be done in writing. The third section may be written or oral (to be de- 
cided in consultation with the committee), and in the latter case the student will sched- 
ule an examination time with her/his committee. At least one examination must be writ- 
ten in the language(s) of study (including the TESOL/Language option), and students 
will be expected to demonstrate appropriate command of the language(s). 

If any student fails one written examination, s/he must pass an oral examination on 
the section failed; if a student who has elected to take two written and one oral exami- 
nations should fail the oral, s/he must schedule a make-up examination with the com- 
mittee. Any student who fails two or more examinations, written or oral, must retake all 
comprehensive examinations in a later semester. 

Thesis 

As mentioned above, a student may elect to write a thesis in order to satisfy the 
research requirement. Under this option, the student is not required to take tho written 
comprehensive examinations but is still responsible for the reading list for her/his area(s). 
For more information about this option, see the document "Information Regarding The- 
ses" (available in 205 Chitwood). 

Graduation 

During the semester in which a student plans to graduate, he/she must register for 
graduation with the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences (103 Woodbum) and fill out an 
application requesting a Shuttle Sheet from the College (available in 205 Chitwood). 
The student will then be notified of any deficiencies and will be responsible for correct- 
ing them by the appropriate deadlines. The student must also pay graduation fees. 
NOTE: All students must be enrolled for at least one credit hour the semester they 
intend to graduate. 

Bibliography and Research (BIBY) 

301. Introduction to Research. I. 1-3 HR. (For seminar credit, counts as 1 hour; for a specific 
project carried out during the course, counts as 3 hours.) PR: Graduate standing. Pro-seminar in 
graduate-level research in foreign languages, literature, and linguistics. 



1 26 WVU Graduate Catalog 



365. Methods of Research. I. 3 HR. 

Classics (CLAS) 

201. Roman Novelists. I. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: CLAS 109, 110, or consent. 

202. Roman Comedy. II. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: CLAS 109, 110, or consent. 
235. Roman Epic. I. 3 HR. PR: CLAS 109, 110, or equiv. 

292. Pro-Seminar in Latin or Greek Literature. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special topics. 

392. Seminar in Latin or Greek Literature. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special topics. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities lead- 
ing to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

English as a Second Language 

391 . Advanced Topics. I, II. 1 -6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in 
regularly scheduled courses. 

Foreign Literature in Translation (FLIT) 

211. Chinese Literature in Translation. I. 3 HR. Survey of selected works of Chinese literature 
form ancient times through the eighteenth century. 

221 . Japanese Literature in Translation. II. 3 HR. Survey of selected works of Japanese literature 
from ancient period to the mid-nineteenth century and an introduction to a few works of the mod- 
ern period. 

241 . Women Writers of Spain. 3 HR. Major women writers of Spain from the earliest extant manu- 
scripts to the present; focus on 20th century works. Spanish majors will read selections in the 
original. 

263. French Women Writers. 3 HR. Selected works of French women writers. 3 HR. lee. 

292. Pro-Seminar. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: 6 HR. upper-division literature courses or consent. Special 
topics. 

369. Comparative Literature: Theory and Practice. I. 3 HR. PR: Reading fluency in at least one 
foreign language. Conceptual bases of comparative literature and their application to literary in- 
terpretation. 

392. Seminar. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: 6 HR. of upper-division literature courses or consent. Special 
topics. 

French (FRCH) 

203. Oral Expression. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. of upper-division French. Intensive practice of oral skills 
with emphasis on discussion, debate, reciatin, reading aloud, etc. 

217. French Civilization. II. 3 HR. PR: 12 HR. of French. 

221. The Romantic Movement. I. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of French or consent. 

222. French Realism. II. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of French or consent. 

229. Literature of the Sixteenth Century. I. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of French or consent. 

231. Phonetics and Pronunciation. II. 3 HR. PR: 12 HR. of French or equiv. 

232. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 3 HR. PR: 18 hrs. of French or consent. Survey of major 
literary works of eighteenth century France. 

292. Pro-Seminar. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: 18 HR. of French or consent. Special topics. 



Foreign Languages 1 27 



305. Fundamentals for Reading French. I. 3 HR. PR: Graduate or upper-division standing. (FRCH 
305 and 306 is intended for graduate students from other departments to teach them to read 
general and technical French.) 

306. Reading French. II. 3 HR. PR: 12 HR. of French or equivalent or FRCH 305. (Graduate 
students meet a doctoral foreign language requirement by achieving a grade of B or better in this 
course.) 

326. Literary Criticism. II. 3 HR. PR: B.A. in French or consent. 

337. Moliere. II. 3 HR. PR: B.A. in French or consent. 

344. Explication de Textes. II. 3 HR. PR: 24 HR. of French or equivalent. 

371 . The Modern Novel to 1930. I. 3 HR. PR: B.A. in French or consent. 

372. The Novel After 1930. II. 3 HR. PR: B.A. in French or consent. 

374. French Women Writers. 3 HR. PR: B.A. in French or consent. Selected works of French 
women writers. 

381 . Medieval French Literature. II. 3 HR. PR: LING 342 or consent. 

391 . Advanced Topics. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in 
regularly scheduled courses. 

392. Seminar. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special topics. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II. 1-15 hr PR: Consent. Research activities leading 
to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

German (GER) 

245. Classicism and Romanticism. I. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of German or consent. Critical study of 
German literature from 1750 to 1830. 

246. The Liberal Age. II. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of German or consent. Critical study of German 
literature from 1830 to 1870. 

247. The Age of Crisis. I. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of German or consent. A critical study of German 
literature from 1870 to 1945. 

292. Pro-Seminar. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special topics. 

305. Fundamentals for Reading German. I. 3 HR. PR: Graduate or upper-division standing. (GER 
305-306 is intended for graduate students from other departments to teach them to read general 
and technical German.) 

306. Reading German. II. 3 HR. PR: 12 HR. of German or equivalent or GER 305. (Graduate 
students may meet a doctoral foreign language requirement by achieving a grade of B or better in 
this course.) 

376. The German Novel. 3 HR. A study of representative novels from various periods. 

391. Advanced Topics. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in 
reguarly scheduled courses. 

392. Seminar. 1-6 HR. PR: Graduate standing or consent. Special topics. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities lead- 
ing to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

Language Teaching Methods (LANG) 

221. The Teaching of Foreign Languages. I.3HR. PR: Consent. Required of all students who are 
prospective foreign language teachers on the secondary level. 



1 28 WVU Graduate Catalog 



292. Pro-Seminar. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special topics. 

321 . ESL Methods. I, II, S. 3 HR. Theory and practice of teaching English as a second language; 
techniques and approaches for teaching speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. 

391 . Advanced Topics. I, II. 1 -6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in 
regularly scheduled courses. 

392. Seminar. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special topics. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II. 1-15 hr PR: Consent. Research activities leading 
to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

421. Teaching Foreign Language in College. I, II. 1-6 HR. Methods and techniques of teaching a 
foreign language at the college level. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. Required each semester of all graduate assistants in 
the Department of Foreign Languages. 

Linguistics (LING) 

202. Phonology. I, II. 3 HR. PR: LING 1 or LING 111. Description of sounds and sound systems in 
language. Articulatory phonetics. Structuralist and generative approaches to phonemics. 

217. Structure of Spanish. I. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of SPAN and LING 111 or consent. Description of 
the phonological or grammatical systems of Spanish, with emphasis on contrastive analysis (Span- 
ish/English) and applied linguistics. 

247. Structure of Modern French. I. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of FRCH and LING 111 or consent. Study 
of phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern French together with a contrastive analysis of 
French and English. 

257. Structure of German. II. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of German and LING 111 or consent. Phonologi- 
cal, morphological and syntactical structure of contemporary German language. 

267. Structure of Russian. II. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of Russian and LING 111 or consent. Phonologi- 
cal, morphological, and syntactical structure of contemporary Russian. 

283. Transformational Grammar. S. 3 HR. PR: LING 111 and consent. Emphasis on generative 
syntax in English, German, Romance, and Slavic languages. 

284. History of Linguistics. I. 3 HR. PR: LING 111 or consent. Development of linguistics from 
Greeks and Romans to contemporary researchers with concentration on major linguists and schools 
of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

288. Sociolinguistics. I. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: LING 1 or LING 111. Linguistic study of geo- 
graphical and social variation in languages; effects of regional background, social class, ethnic 
group, sex, and setting; outcomes of conflict between dialect and between languages. 

292. Pro-Seminar. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special topics. 

311. History of the Spanish Language. II. (Alt. yrs.) 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of Spanish and LING 111 or 
consent. Evolution of Castilian from Vulgar Latin to its modern standard form through a study of 
historical phonology, morphology, and syntax, together with the external factors which influenced 
the development of the language. 

313. Old Spanish. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. 

331. Applied Linguistics. 3 HR. PR: LING 111 and prior second language study. Study of the 
application of linguistic analysis in the areas of language acquisition, instruction, and use. 



Foreign Languages ^ 29 



341. History of the French Language. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of French and LING 
111 or consent. Evolution of French from Vulgar Latin into the Modern French standard through a 
study of historical phonology, morphology, and syntax, together with the external factors which 
influenced the development of the language. 

343. Old French. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Study of the oldest monuments of the French language 
including the Chanson de Roland and Aucassin et Nicolette in an effort to trace the evolution of 
Francien, Anglo-Norman, and Picard and Vulgar Latin. 

351. History of the German Language. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of German and 
LING 111 or consent. Historical development of standard German languages and dialects. 

353. Middle High German 1. I. 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of German and LING 111 or consent. Study of 
the linguistic developments of Middle High German from the eleventh to the fifteenth centuries 
with illustrative readings from the Niebelungenlied. 

361. History of the Russian Language. II. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: 18 HR. of Russian and 
LING 111 or consent. Development of Russian from Indo-European to the present. 

363. Language Change and Reconstruction. 3 HR. PR: LING 111 or equivalent. Exploration of the 
mechanisms of language change, theories of diachronic linguistics, and techniques for recon- 
structing unattested languages; concentration on the Indo-European family and its history. 

383. Advanced Transformational Syntax. I. 3 HR. PR: LING 282 or consent. Examination and 
discussion of theorectical issues in generative-transformational syntax. Focus on specific propos- 
als advanced within the framework of Government-Binding Theory. 

387. Psycholinguistics. I.3HR. PR: LING 111 or consent. Provides an insight into the many areas 
of psycholinguistics study, including language acquisition, sentence processing, animal commu- 
nication, dichotic listening, aphasia, and semantics. 

391. Advanced Topics. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in 
regularly scheduled courses. 

392. Seminar. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special topics. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities lead- 
ing to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

Russian (RUSS) 

292. Pro-Seminar. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: 18 HR. of Russian or equiv. 

Spanish (SPAN) 

221. Golden Age Literature. II. 3 HR. PR: At least one literature course in Spanish. Readings in 
Spanish literature of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, in the novel, the comedia, and lyric 
poetry. 

292. Pro-Seminar. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special Topics. 

315. Lyric Poetry. I. 3 HR. PR: 24 HR. of Spanish or equivalent. 

324. Explicacion De Textos. II. (Alt. yrs.) 3 HR. PR: 24 HR. of Spanish or equivalent. 

326. Cervantes. II. 3 HR. PR: 24 HR. of Spanish or consent. 

391 . Advanced Topics. I, II. 1 -6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in 
regularly scheduled classes. 

392. Seminar. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Special topics. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities lead- 
ing to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 



1 30 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Geography 

Trevor Harris, Chairperson of the Department of Geology and Geography 
Ann Oberhauser, Associate Chairperson for Geography 
425 White Hall, P.O. Box 6300 

Degrees Offered: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy 
with a major in Geography 

The graduate program in geography at West Virginia University provides students with 
the opportunity to study for a master of arts or a doctor of philosophy degree with an area 
of emphasis in one or more of the following fields: 

• Geographic information systems and remote sensing 

• Regional development and planning 

• Environmental and resource geography 

Research 

Students who are interested in pursuing research in an area other than these may do so 
provided the research area matches the interest of a faculty member in the department who 
agrees to supervise the student's program. Students who wish to focus their research on a 
particular region are encouraged to do so. The graduate program in geography at WVU has 
strong links with the University's Regional Research Institute, the geology program, the 
Water Research Institute, the international studies program, the West Virginia Geological 
and Economic Survey, the Center for Women's Studies, and the Center for Black Culture 
and Research. 

Admission/Application Requirements 

Master of Arts applicants must submit GRE scores, a personal two-page statement 
defining the applicant's interest in geography and career intentions, and two letters of 
recommendation from people who are familiar with the student's undergraduate training. 
Ph.D. applicants should send three letters of recommendation, GRE scores, and a per- 
sonal, two-page statement defining the applicant's interest in geography and career in- 
tentions. This material should be forwarded directly to the coordinator of the geography 
graduate program at West Virginia University 425 White Hall, P.O. Box 6300, Morgan- 
town, WV 26506 

Prospective students must have an overall undergraduate GPAof 2.75 and a 3.0 GPA 
for undergraduate geography courses. Students with degrees in other disciplines are 
encouraged to apply although they may be asked to make up deficiencies in geography 
during the first year in the program. 

Master of Arts 

Each incoming student is interviewed prior to the first semester to ascertain the student's 
interests and to assess whether the student has academic deficiencies. All students are 
initially supervised by the coordinator of the graduate program until the student develops a 
more clearly defined research interest. During the early part of the second semester of 
residence, a first year progress interview will be held with Department of Geography Gra- 
duate Studies Committee. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss student progress in the 
program and to facilitate the process of choosing an M.A. thesis advisor and committee. 
Two of the three committee members (including the advisor) must be geography faculty 
members at WVU. Students may change advisor or committee members after consultation 
with the advisor and the Department of Geography Graduate Studies Committee. In cases 
where a student is performing significantly below expectations, the progress interview may 
result in non-continuance in the program. 



Geography 131 



Course Work A student will be awarded the master of arts degree after completing 30 
hours of graduate credit. The student is required to take the following courses: Geo- 
graphic Traditions (GEOG 301 ), Geographic Design (GEOG 302) and four semesters of 
the Colloquium (GEOG 300). The student will also select four elective courses, three of 
which must be in geography, that provide training in the student's area of specialization. 

Thesis The thesis and thesis defense will represent the outcome of independent re- 
search undertaken by the student. The thesis must reflect the student's knowledge of the 
literature relevant and be regarded by the student's program committee as a contribution 
to the discipline of geography. The student's committee will determine the proposal's 
acceptability. If it is deemed unacceptable, a further presentation may be required. The 
proposal must be typed and copied to the committee at least two weeks prior to the 
presentation. A full proposal of the thesis research will be presented to the faculty in an 
oral presentation at the end of the second semester or beginning of the third semester. 
The defense of the thesis will take place when the student and his/her committee agree 
that a defensible copy of the thesis is complete. The thesis examination is graded on a 
pass/provisional pass/fail basis by a majority vote of the committee. A student who fails 
may submit another thesis or a revised version upon the approval of the student's 
committee. No student may be reexamined more than once. A student who is given a 
provisional pass will generally be required to make minor revisions or corrections to the 
thesis. It is expected that full-time students shall not need more than two years to satisfy 
all program requirements. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Prospective doctor of philosophy students must have a master's degree. Students with 
degrees in other disciplines are encouraged to apply, but they may be asked to make up 
deficiencies in geography during their first year in the program. Incoming geography stu- 
dents may also be asked to make up deficiencies if any are found during the student's entry 
interview with faculty. This interview is immediately prior to the first semester of the 
program. 

Students are expected to be well grounded in one of the program's areas of emphasis, 
and also in the history and philosophy of geography. Students will be awarded a Ph.D. after 
obtaining 54 hours of graduate credit, completing certain required courses, passing com- 
prehensive examinations, and writing a dissertation. These steps are discussed in more 
detail below. 

Course Work The courses Geographic Traditions (GEOG 301 ) and Geographic Research 
Design (GEOG 302) are required, as well as three general electives and two method elec- 
tives. An additional 11 hours of other courses, which may include seminars and directed 
study courses, must also be completed. A limited number of the required courses may be 
waived if the student has already completed an equivalent course and can demonstrate 
proficiency with the material. 

Examinations and Dissertation The student is required to pass an oral and three 
written comprehensive examinations. The student will be examined on two areas of 
specialization and the student's dissertation, research topic. Upon successful comple- 
tion of the comprehensive examination the student will be expected to defend a disser- 
tation research proposal. The award of the Ph.D. is granted upon the successful 
defense of the dissertation itself. 



1 32 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Teaching Assistantships 

The geography graduate program has available several teaching and research assis- 
tantships each year, which are allocated to qualified students on a competitive basis. 
These awards include a full tuition waiver. Teaching assistantships are awarded annually 
and for no more than four semesters for M.A. students and six semesters for Ph.D. 
students. Assistantships are reconfirmed each year based on performance in the previ- 
ous year with respect to both assistantship duties and academic progress. Additionally, 
meritorious tuition waivers are offered on a competitive basis to outstanding students 
who do not receive assistantships. Requests for teaching assistantships and tuition waivers 
should be sent directly to the coordinator of graduate studies in geography. The deadline 
for receipt of the latter application is March 15. 

Research Assistantships 

Research assistantships must be applied for through the faculty member whose research 
is providing the funding. The geography faculty are engaged in numerous funded research 
projects, many of which provide graduate students with opportunities for obtaining research 
skills and experience as well as employment and tuition aid. Furthermore, the professional 
contacts made in the course of faculty research frequently provide graduate students with 
opportunities for career development. 

Computing Facilities 

The geography program's computing facilities are based on an NT local area net- 
work. Twelve unix workstations are clustered via Ethernet. The teaching laboratory is 
based upon INTEL Pentium PCs networked via Ethernet to the cluster and supporting 
graphic terminal emulation. The system has in excess of nine gigabytes of on-line stor- 
age and magnetic tape drives. It supports Tektronix graphic workstations, multiple ter- 
minals, four digitizers, a color scanner, and a 36" color electrostatic plotter and a dye 
sublimation printer. Major hardware upgrades are scheduled. 

The computer equipment is housed in recently renovated computer laboratories within 
the department. The labs represent state-of-the-art computing facilities funded by the 
NSF and WVU. The laboratory provides hands-on capability for research and teaching 
as well as computer-based lecture facilities and is among the most sophisticated facili- 
ties in the country. 

The laboratory operates ESRI's ARC-INFO in both multi-user and workstation envi- 
ronments. TYDAC SPANS raster GIS operating under OS/2 is supported on the per- 
sonal computers. ERDAS Imagine and GRASS are installed on the workstations. The 
laboratory has SAS, SAS-Graph, Surface III, Oracle, and extensive database, graphics, 
spreadsheet, and statistical packages. Dynamic Graphics 3-D EMOD software is cur- 
rently being installed on a dedicated workstation for GIS applications. 

The remote sensing program operates two full-range, portable spectroradiometers, an ASD 
full range, and a GER MK IV. 

Geography (GEOG) 

200. Geographical Data Analysis. 3 HR. Quantitative techniques for collection, classification, and 
spatial analysis of geographical data with emphasis on map analysis and application of spatial 
statistics. 

201. Geography of West Virginia and Appalachia. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 8 or consent. Geographic 
analysis of the changing socio-economic activities and physical environment in West Virginia and 
Appalachia. Emphasis on the historical development of the state and region and contemporary 
spatial and social inequalities. 



Geography 1 33 



202. Political Geography. II. 3 HR. Examines the interrelationship between politics and the envi- 
ronment, human territoriality, the political organization of space, geopolitical aspects of the na- 
tion-state and international problems. 

205. History of Geography in U.S. Environment. II. 3 Hr Surveys natural resource exploitation and 
environmental alteration in the United States from 1 600 to the present with consideration of chang- 
ing natural resource, conservation, and environmental perceptions and policies. 

209. Industrial Geography. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 109 or consent. Introduction to theories and 
concepts of industrial geography; emphasis on the interdependence of the world economy and 
spatial patterns of industrial restructuring; case studies from various industrial sectors and re- 
gions. 

210. Global Issues: Inequality and Interdependence. II. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: GEOG 1 or 
GEOG 2 or GEOG 8. Themes of spatial equity and justice in an increasingly inter-dependent 
world system. Contemporary issues concerning location, place, movement, and region. 

21 1 . Rural and Regional Development. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 2 or GEOG 8. An investigation into rural 
and regional development in developed and underdeveloped regions. The relationship between 
development theory and policy is explored. 

212. Geography of Gender. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 8 or consent. An exploration of how gender affects 
spatial patterns and processes. Theoretical and empirical aspects of feminism are analyzed in- 
cluding women and employment, Third World feminism, sexuality and space, and gender in 
academia. 

215. Environmental Systems Geography. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 7, equivalent or consent. A geo- 
graphic analysis of the earth system emphasizing the interdependence and feedback mecha- 
nisms of the hydrologic cycle, ecosystems and climate. 

219. Problems in Geography. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Independent study or special topics. 

220. Seminar in Geography. I, II. 1-12 HR. persem.; max. 15 HR. PR: Consent. Includes separate 
seminars in urban, economic, physical, behavioral, social, Appalachian, transportation, census, 
planning, resource, international studies, geographic model building, rural problems, cartogra- 
phy, aging, and environment, and energy. 

221. Geomorphology. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 1 and GEOL 2 An examination of earth-surface pro- 
cesses and landforms, with emphasis on environmental geomorphology, streams, floods, gla- 
ciers, and landslides. (Required field trip at student's expense; also listed as GEOL 221 .) 

225. Urban and Regional Planning. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 110 or POLS 121 or consent. Explores 
concepts, techniques, and processes of physical and socioeconomic planning and their applica- 
tion to urban and regional problems. 

230. Land Use Policy. (Alternate years). 3 HR. PR: GEOG 225 or consent. Basic concepts of land 
use policy at the national, regional, county, and local level are examined. Environmental and land 
use policies are analyzed. 

250. Introduction to GIS. 4 HR. Geographic information systems (GIS) in principle and practice. 
Spatial data handling in a computer environment: data, analysis, production and information dis- 
play for planning and decision-making. (3 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab.) 

251 . Geographic Information Systems Technical Issues. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: GEOG 250. 
Technical aspects of GIS functions, algorithms, theory of geographical data structures and error 
handling. Labs require tools, data and macros to construct small GIS. (2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab.) 

252. GIS Applications. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 250. GIS uses, needs, analysis, design, and imple- 
mentation. Operational institutional and management topics of GIS for planning, locational deci- 
sion making in business, government, and research contexts. (2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab.) (Also listed 
as GEOL 254.) 

253. GIS Design and Implementation. I. II. S. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 250 and consent. Geographic 
database design and implementation using contemporary GIS software. 



1 34 WVU Graduate Catalog 






255. Introduction to Remote Sensing. I. 3 HR. Theory, technology and applications of photo- 
interpretation and digital image analysis of aerial photography and multispectral images. (2 HR. 
lee, 1 HR. lab.) Also listed as GEOL 255. 

262. Digital Cartography. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 161 or consent. Computer-assisted mapping empha- 
sizing the appropriate uses of software in thematic and topographic map design, annotation, 
symbolization, color, design, display, and reproduction. 

266. Field Camp. 3-6 HR. Observations, data gathering, and other field techniques for under- 
standing physical environment, human geography, and culture; off-campus field experience. (3 
HR. lee, 3 HR. field camp.) 

285. Methods of Geographic Research. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Geographic analysis as problem- 
solving activity. Practical experience in field techniques, library research, hypothesis formation 
and testing, and report preparation and presentation. Students will acquire skills in literary and 
numerical approaches to geographic data analysis. 

290. Geographical Perspectives on Energy. 3 HR. PR: Consent. A survey of the distribution of 
finite, renewable, and continuous energy resources and an investigation of the geographical pat- 
terns of energy consumption and energy flows. The policy implications of an unequal distribution 
of energy are evaluated. 

295. Internship. I, II, S. 1-12 HR. PR: Junior standing and consent. A working internship with an 
agency or company designed to give the student experience in the practical application of geo- 
graphic training to specific problems. 

299. Honors Thesis. I, II, S. 3-6 HR. PR: Departmental consent. Thesis proposal, writing, and 
defense for students admitted to the Honors Program. 

300. Geography Research Colloquium. I, II. 1 HR. PR: Consent. Lectures and presentation on 
recent and current research by resident and visiting scholars. 

301 . Geographic Traditions. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Review of the major approaches in geographic 
scholarship. 

302. Geographic Research-Design. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 200 and GEOG 301. Choosing, prepar- 
ing, and developing research problems of geographic interest. Emphasizes proposal writing and 
research design alternatives. 

309. Advanced Industrial Geography. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 209 or consent. Examination of theoreti- 
cal perspectives and applied research in industrial geography, focus on international industry and 
employment trends with case studies from developed and underdeveloped regions. 

315. Development Geography. 3 HR. PR: Consent. An analysis of the concept and practice of 
development. Alternative people-centered approaches to social change are investigated. 

321 . Advanced Fluvial Geomorphology. I. 4 HR. PR: GEOL 221 or GEOG 221 or consent. Analy- 
sis of stream processes, landforms, deposits, including paleohydrology and Appalachian surficial 
geology. (Fall semester of odd numbered years; required weekend field trips at student's ex- 
pense; also listed as GEOL 321 .) 

322. Surficial and Glacial Geology. I. 4 HR. PR: GEOL 221 or GEOG 221 or consent. Analysis of 
late Cenozoic landscapes, especially those caused by glaciers or other-wise influenced by global 
climate change. (Fall semester of even-numbered years; required weekend field trips at student's 
expense; also listed as GEOL 322.) 

325. Planning Theory and Process. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: GEOG 225 or consent. A survey 
of the historical development of planning theory, the various roles planners play and the ethical 
dilemmas they face. 

329. Problems in Geomorphology. I, II. 1-4 HR. (Also listed as GEOL 329.) 

351 . GIS Technical Issues. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 250. Current issues in GIS research. Technical aspects 
of GIS operations, algorithms, theory of geographical data structures, and error handlings. Labs focus 
on tools, data structures, database languages, and macros. ( 2 HR. lee, 1 hr lab.) 



Geography 1 35 



391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

399. Advanced Research Methods. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 301 and consent. Review of quantitative 
and qualitative methods used in geographic research. 

41 1 . Regional Development. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Review of contemporary geographic theories of 
uneven spatial development of capitalism. 

420. Resource Geography Seminar. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Survey of the geographical literature on 
natural resource management and nature-society theory. 

452. Advanced GIS. I. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 252 or GEOG 351 , or consent. Functional strengths and 
weaknesses of GIS. Related geographical information science technologies, GPS, remote sens- 
ing, multimedia, spatial statistics, and expert systems. Multi-dimensionality (4-D GIS), temporal- 
ity, social implications of GIS. 

455. Advanced Remote Sensing. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 255, GEOL 255, or consent. Collection, 
processing and classification of remotely sensed data, including optical, thermal, radar, and topo- 
graphic information. (2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab.) (Also listed as GEOL 455.) 

489. Geography Graduate Student Internship. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Internship in the 
private or public sector designed for practical application of geographic training. 

491. Advanced Study in Geography I, II, S. 1-6 HR. Investigation of topics not covered in regu- 
larly scheduled courses. Study may be independent or through scheduled meetings. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. I, II, S. 1-4 HR. Graduate seminars in geography. 

497. Research in Geography. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



Geology 

Trevor Harris, Chairperson of the Department of Geology and Geography 

Thomas Kammer, Associate Chairperson for Geology 

425 White Hall 

Degrees Offered: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy 

The graduate program in geology at WVU provides study opportunities in the following 
areas: 

• Hydrogeology and Environmental Geology, with strengths in flow and contaminant-trans- 
port modeling, mine reclamation, floods and debris flows, landfill siting, and monitoring; 

• Basin Analysis, with strengths in seismic modeling, basin structures, deposystem analy- 
sis, sequence stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, diagenesis, and plate tectonics; and 

• Energy Geology, with strengths in the exploration and development of oil, gas, and coal. 



1 36 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Admission Procedures and Prerequisites 

Applicants for graduate studies in geology must have as a minimum requirement a 
bachelor's degree and an overall grade-point average of at least 2.75. Acceptance by 
the Department of Geology and Geography is necessary before admission of any pro- 
spective student to the program. All candidates for a graduate degree in geology must 
submit scores in the general aptitude tests of the Graduate Record Examination. Appli- 
cants seeking admission and financial support for the fall semester should apply by 
February 15. For spring semester, apply by October 1. Write to the department for an 
application package. 

Before being admitted to programs leading to the master of science or the doctor of 
philosophy, a student must pass an undergraduate review examination covering physi- 
cal, historical and structural geology, sedimentation-stratigraphy, and mineralogy. The 
examination is given from 7:00-9:30 p.m. on the third day of classes each semester. 

Students seeking admission to the master's program or the Ph.D. program must com- 
plete the equivalents of all allied science and mathematics courses required for the B.S. 
in geology at WVU, plus the following geology courses: Geology 1 , 2, 3, 4, 1 52, 1 84, 1 85, 
261, and 266. Similar courses from other universities or relevant experiences may be 
substituted if approved by the departmental graduate curriculum committee. In some 
cases a requirement may be waved by the committee if the student can pass the under- 
graduate review examination for that subject area. 

GPA Requirements 

A minimum grade-point average of 3.0 must be maintained in required formal courses 
in geology and cognate fields for the master's degree and 3.3 for the Ph.D. Loads of 9-12 
hours are required and no withdrawals are permitted after the first two weeks of a se- 
mester. A student who fails to maintain the required average at the completion of any 
semester during the graduate program will be allowed one academic year (two semes- 
ters) to attain the required average. Failure to attain this average by the end of the proba- 
tionary period will permanently eliminate the student as a candidate for a graduate de- 
gree in this department. 

Master of Science 

Emphasis Areas Students are required to take certain courses specified by their advi- 
sory committee. Students in the research option must take at least one course in each of 
three different areas in geology. Students in the Professional Studies option must take at 
least five courses from a minimum of three different topic areas. The five topic areas, 
with the relevant courses, are as follows: 

• Stratigraphy/Sedimentation/Paleontology: GEOL 332, 341, 346; 

• Structure/Tectonics. GEOL 351, 354, 357; 

• Petrology. GEOL 385, 394; 

• Geophysics/Quantitative Methods/GIS/Remote Sensing. GEOL 252, 352, 353, 
399, and GEOG 251 , 252, and 355; 

• Hydrogeology/Geomorphology. GEOL 321, 322, 362, 364, 365, 395. 

Approved graduate courses in biology, chemistry, physics, computer science, math- 
ematics, engineering, soil sciences, or law may be taken as outside courses by geology 
graduate students. Students are free to take as many courses as they choose outside 
the department as long as they satisfy the emphasis areas requirements. 

No later than the beginning of the second semester in residence, the prospective can- 
didate must choose one of the options leading to the master of science (M.S.) degree in 
geology. 



Geology 1 37 



Research Option This has been the traditional option for the master of science in geol- 
ogy. Students considering continued studies (doctor of philosophy) should choose this 
option. A minimum of 24 formal course hours or seeking employment in an area of geo- 
logical research and six research hours are required for graduation. A thesis based on 
original research also is required. With consent of the candidate's advisory committee, 
the field work need not be done while in residence at WVU. 

Required to graduate: 30 hours, including certain required courses specified by 
the advisor. 

Professional Studies Option This option is designed specifically for students seeking 
experience in preparing and presenting professional problems. Students choosing this 
option would be seeking employment in technical fields rather than continuing studies for 
a higher degree. A minimum of 34 formal-course hours and 8 problems hours (GEOL 
392) are required for graduation. The problems hours are in lieu of a thesis and are 
designed to simulate the work of professional geologists as they seek solutions to open- 
ended problems. Experience in presentation of problems and solutions is an integral part 
of the program. Problems credits may be earned in conjunction with off-campus experi- 
ences by consent of the candidate's advisory committee. Required to graduate: 
42 hours, including certain required courses specified by the advisor. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program The candidate for the doctor of philosophy must complete a program of courses 
outlined by the candidate's doctoral committee. Written and oral comprehensive exami- 
nations must be successfully completed. Work on original research is to be presented in 
a dissertation and defended in an oral examination. Graduate seminar is required. 

Cooperative Projects 

The National Research Center for Coal and Energy is located on the WVU campus. 
Research funding for graduate students is obtained by graduate faculty through the 
NRCCE's National Mine Land Reclamation Center and Water Research Institute. Close 
cooperation between the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, located on 
Cheat Lake near Morgantown, and the Department of Geology and Geography makes a 
large amount of material available for laboratory investigation, including the fossil collec- 
tions of the department and the survey. A large number of samples of drill cuttings from 
deep wells in West Virginia and adjoining states are housed in the survey. Complete 
analytical geochemical equipment is available through a University analytical laboratory 
available to the department. The department also has a number of cooperative projects 
with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy. Mor- 
gantown is conveniently situated for detailed studies of Mississippian, Pennsylvanian, 
and Permian formations. Mineral products of the region near Morgantown include coal, 
petroleum, natural gas. and limestone. The occurrence and utilization of these materials 
can be studied by graduate students interested in economic geology. 

Equipment and Facilities 

Department geophysical equipment includes a Geometries magnetometer, a Worden 
gravimeter, an engineering seismograph, and a three-component short period seismograph. 
A permanent summer field camp (Camp Wood) is located in the folded Appalachians at 
Alvon (Greenbrier County), West Virginia, although its basic field course also includes 
mapping of metamorphic and igneous rocks along the Maine sea coast. 



1 38 WVU Graduate Catalog 



The geology program includes an annual trip to the Florida Keys and glacial geology 
studies in Maine. Additional oceanography courses and research are available at the 
Marine Science Consortium at Wallops Island, Virginia, with which WVU is affiliated. 

Research and Teaching Computer Resources 

The department's computing facilities are centered around an Open VMS Cluster pro- 
viding a local area network with a fiber optic link to the Internet. The cluster is comprised 
of three main machines: a VAX 4000, a MicroVAX 3900, and a VaxStation 3500 with 
attached Sky Warrior array processor. In addition, A VaxStation 3100, and a Dec Alpha 
3400 complete the cluster. The cluster contains nine gigs of on-line storage and services 
printers, plotters, and PCs throughout the department. 

A recently renovated computer lab provides seating for 26 people with access to Intel 
486/66 and Pentium-based personal computers. Teaching and research facilities offer 
numerous printers and plotters, including high-speed laser printers, a Tektronix color 
plotter, Versatec and Benson black and white electrostatic plotters, and a Calcomp elec- 
trostatic plotter. 

The department is making a transition from an Open VMS cluster to a client server 
network centered around an AlphaServer 2100 4/200 with 128 megs of RAM, a Dec 
Alpha 3400 Workstation, an HP Apollo 9000/720 Workstation, and a DecStation 5400. 
Future modifications to the computing facilities include acquisition of a Windows NT server 
and a multimedia lab. 

Computer Software Resources 

The department maintains several software packages that are available for both in- 
structional and research usage. Statistical packages such as SAS, Minitab, and NTSYS 
allow students to undertake detailed statistical analysis. Surface III, Mapping Contour 
System, and other mapping software enable users to contour and compare 2D sur- 
faces. Geographic Information System (GIS) software, including ARC-INFO, IDRISI, 
GRASS, and SPANS, is accessible to students who want to integrate and compare 
complex geological and geophysical data. ERDAS IMAGINE provides a suite of image 
processing tools for analyzing remote sensed data. Dynamic Graphics Earth Vision 
software provides an interactive 3D visualization environment to assist interpretation of 
multidisciplinary data. AutoCAD and other computer-aided design packages are avail- 
able to accurately draw surfaces and diagrams. 

State-of-the-art geophysical modeling and processing software are also available for 
instructional and research use. GX Technologies' Advanced Interpretive Modeling 
System, and Landmark Geophysical's MIRA software help in the analysis of reflection 
seismic data. Seismic processing capabilities are present in the form of numerous 
internally developed software in addition to Western Geographical^ Sierra Seis, and 
ICI's Eavesdropper processing software. Interpex Ltd.'s MAGIX package is used to 
undertake both forward and inverse modeling of gravity and magnetic data. Interpex 
Ltd.'s RESIXIP and EMIX34 provide forward and inverse modeling capabilities for 
resistivity and terrain conductivity data. 

Software for groundwater modeling falls into several categories. Emphasis is placed 
on using state-of-practice commercial packages whenever appropriate to enhance ca- 
reer development for both research and professional practice. Supported capabilities 
include aquifier characterization (AQTESOLV), finite-difference flow codes (MODFLOW), 
particle-tracking and pathline analysis codes (MODPATH, PATH3D), and solute-trans- 
port codes (HFLOW, SOLUTE). Both preprocessors (MODELCAD) and postprocessors 
(SURFER, Spyglass TRANSFORM) are available for visualization of modeling results. 
Software in a variety of levels of sophistication are employed so that instruction can be 
carried out at both undergraduate and advanced levels. 

Geology 1 39 



Geology (GEOL) 

201. Physical Geology for Teachers. I, II. 3 HR. (Credit cannot be obtained for both GEOL 201 
and GEOL 1.) PR: High school teaching certificate and consent. Composition and structure of 
earth and the geologic processes which shape its surface. 

215. Environmental Geology II. 3 HR. PR or CONC: GEOL 221. Principles, practice, and case 
histories in application of earth science to environmental problems. Includes: water quality; land- 
slides; subsidence; waste disposal; legal aspects; and geological aspects of land-use planning. 
(Field trips and independent field project required.) 

221 . Geomorphology II. 3 HR. PR: (GEOL 1 and GEOL 2) or (GEOL 1 and GEOL 11 ) or (GEOG 
10 and GEOG 11). An examination of earth-surface processes and landforms, with emphasis on 
environmental geomorphology, streams, floods, glaciers, and landslides. (Required field trip at 
student's expense; also listed as GEOG 221.) 

231 . Paleontology. I. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 3 and GEOL 4 and STAT 101. Uses of Paleontologic data 
in geology; biostratigraphy, paleoecology, evolution, extinction, and biogeography; lab emphasis 
on identification and utilization of marine invertebrate fossils. (Required weekend field trip at 
student's expense.) 

235. Introductory Paleobotany. I. 4 HR. PR: GEOL 3. (Required Saturday field trips at student's 
expense.) Resume of development of principal plant groups through the ages, present distribu- 
tion, mode of occurrence and index species, methods of collection. 

252. Environmental and Expl. Geophysics 1. I. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 2 and (MATH 16 or GEOL 161). 
Basic theory, computer modeling, and use of gravitational, magnetic, resistivity, and electromag- 
netic methods in the evaluation of shallow targets of interest to environmental, hydrological, and 
hazardous waste site investigations. 

253. Structural Geology. I. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 3 and GEOL 4 and GEOL 184 and GEOL 185 and 
PHYS 1 . Introduction to rock deformation processes and the interpretation of geologic structure, 
with applications to the structure and tectonic evolution of the Appalachian Mountains. (Several 
required one-day field trips.) 

254. GIS Applications. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 200 and GEOG 250. Operational and management 
issues in planning management analysis, locational decision making, and design implementation 
of GIS. Lab project emphasizes student's specialization (2 HR. lee, 2 HR. lab; alternate years; 
also listed as GEOG 252.) 

255. Introduction to Remote Sensing. I. 3 HR. Theory, technology and applications of photo- 
interpretation and digital image analysis of aerial photography and multispectral images. (2 HR. 
lee, 1 HR. lab; also listed as GEOG 255.) 

260. Carbonate Sedimentation of Florida. S. 2 HR. PR: GEOL 1 and GEOL 2 and consent. Field 
trip to the Florida Keys to study origin and development of coral reefs and related carbonate 
sediments. (Transportation, room and board, boat charter, and other misc. costs at student's 
expense.) 

261. Stratigraphy and Sedimentation. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 3 and GEOL 4 and GEOL 185 and 
GEOL 221. Study of sediments and sedimentary rocks with an emphasis on the analysis of 
facies. (Required field trips at student's expense.) 

263. Physical Hydrogeology. I. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 1 and MATH 3. Principles of ground-water hy- 
drology, emphasizing the physical occurrence and movement of ground water. Topics include 
aquifer properties, flow net analysis, and hydraulic aquifer testing. 

266. Appalachian Geology Field Camp. S. 6 HR. PR: GEOL 185 and GEOL 253 and GEOL 261 
and consent. Practical experience in detailed geological field procedures and mapping. (Living 
expense in addition to tuition must be paid at time of registration.) 

269. Applied Hydrogeology Seminar. I. 1 HR. A review of professional practices and opportunities 
in hydrogeology. Seminar talks by hydrogeological professionals from WVU, industry, and gov- 
ernment agencies. Field trips to examine hydrogeological practices and techniques. 

270. Mineral Resources. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 1 and GEOL 184. Description, mode of occurrence, 
and principles governing the formation of ore deposits. (Offered in fall of alternate years.) 

1 40 WVU Graduate Catalog 



272. Petroleum Geology. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 151 or GEOL 253. Origin, geologic distribution, 
methods of exploration and exploitation, uses and future reserves of petroleum and natural gas in 
the world. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

273. Petroleum Geology Laboratory. II. 1 HR. PR: GEOL 151 or GEOL 253. Well sample descrip- 
tion, correlation, and interpretation. Construction and interpretation of subsurface maps used in 
exploration for hydrocarbons. (Offered in spring of odd years.) 

290. Geologic Problems. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. (12 HR. max.) PR: Consent. Special problems or field 
classes for senior and graduate students. 

294. Environmental Geochemistry. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 161 and CHEM 16. Basic review of physi- 
cal and aqueous chemistry, discussion of basic geochemical processes; calcium carbonate chem- 
istry, diagenetic processes, weathering, the silicate and iron system. 

321 . Advanced Fluvial Geomorphology. I. 4 HR. PR: GEOL 221 or GEOG 221 or consent. Analy- 
sis of stream processes, landforms, deposits, including paleohydrology and Appalachian surficial 
geology. (Fall semester of odd-numbered years; required weekend field trips at student's ex- 
pense; also listed as GEOG 321 . 

322. Surficial and Glacial Geology. I. 4 HR. PR: GEOL 221 or GEOG 221 or consent. Analysis of 
late Cenozoic landscapes, especially those caused by glaciers or otherwise influenced by global 
climate change. (Fall semester of even-numbered years; required weekend field trips at student's 
expense; also listed as GEOG 322. 

329. Problems in Geomorphology. I, II. 1-4 HR. 

332. Paleoecology. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 231 and GEOL 261 or consent. Methods of paleoecologic 
analysis in sedimentary geology. Topics include trace fossil analysis, shell biogeochemistry, com- 
munity paleoecology, biofacies analysis of basins, and Precambrian paleoecology. 

340. Advanced Stratigraphy. 3 HR. 

341 . Carbonate Sedimentology. I (Alternate years). 4 HR. PR: GEOL 231 and GEOL 261 . Origin 
and distribution of modern marine carbonate sediments as models for interpretation of ancient 
limestone and dolomite facies. 

345. Stratigraphy of Porous Media. I. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: GEOL 261 . Advanced discus- 
sion of the deposition of clastic sediments, chemistry of carbonates, sequence stratigraphy, po- 
rosity development in sandstones and limestones, flow of oil through rock. 

346. Advanced Sedimentation. I.4HR. PR: GEOL 261 or consent. (Required field trips at student's 
expense.) Origin of sedimentary rocks; principles involved in interpretation of ancient geography, 
climates, animals, and plants. Emphasis on detrital sediments and rocks. 

351. Tectonics. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 152 and GEOL 261; undergraduates need consent. Investiga- 
tion of patterns and processes of large-scale deformation mechanisms that shape the earth. Fo- 
cuses on the structural evolution and modeling process of various plate boundaries. Offered in 
spring of even years. 

352. Environ and Expl Geophysics 2. I. 4 HR. PR: PHYS 2, and either MATH 16 or GEOL 161, or 
consent. Studies in applied geophysics with emphasis on the environmental applications of re- 
flection and refraction seismology and ground penetrating radar. (3 HR. lee, 1 HR. computer lab.) 

354. Structural Analysis and Synthesis. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 152 and GEOL 261; undergraduates 
need consent. Field and literature studies into the development of structures. Emphasizes the 
use of physical and theoretical models to understand various mechanisms of deformation. Of- 
fered in spring of odd years. 

357. Basin Structures. I. 4 HR. PR: GEOL 152, and GEOL 261 , or equivalent. The origin, develop- 
ment, and distribution of basins and the structure found within basins throughout the world are 
studied. The distribution of energy-related minerals related to basins and structural accumula- 
tions is emphasized. 



Geology 141 



362. Quantitative Hydrogeology. II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 16, and GEOL 263 or permission. Math- 
ematical and computer analysis of groundwater flow. Aquifer systems. Radical-flow solutions. 
Well/aquifer test methods. Superposition, boundaries. Dispersive/advective transport. 

364. Environmental Hydrogeology. II. 4 HR. PR: GEOL 1 and GEOL 2 and GEOL 263, or consent 
(PR or Cone: GEOL 362). Seminar reviewing groundwater occurrence, flow, quality, and explora- 
tion in various geologic terrains; groundwater pollution and dewatering; and groundwater technol- 
ogy. Includes topical literature review. 

365. Groundwater Modeling. I.4HR. PR: GEOL 362 or consent. Theory and application of ground- 
water flow modeling, focusing on MODFLOW. Numerical methods. Discretization and bound- 
aries. Parameterization and calibration. Problems and case-histories. 

366. Karst Geology. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Review of karst terrain hydrogeology and geomorphol- 
ogy, emphasizing origins and nature of caves, sinkholes and other karst landforms, environmen- 
tal problems of karst, and its water and mineral/petroleum resources. 

385. Optical Mineralogy and Petrology. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 185. Introduction to the optical prop- 
erties of minerals and the use of the petrographic microscope, interpretation of sedimentary, igne- 
ous and metamorphic rocks based on microscopic examination of thin sections. (Offered alter- 
nate years.) 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

392. Master's Non-Thesis Research. I, II, S. 1-12 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised non-thesis re- 
search for M.S. Option 2. Report required by arranged deadline. 

394. Physical Geochemistry. I. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 1 and GEOL 185 and CHEM 16. Introduction to 
thermodynamics and its application to geologic systems. Equilibrium calculations involving pure 
phases and solutions in gaseous, liquid and solid states. (Offered in fall of even years.) 

395. Aqueous Geochemistry. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOL 1 and CHEM 12 or CHEM 16, or consent. 
Review of basic chemical principles as they apply to aqueous geochemical environments. Prop- 
erties of water and the types, sources, and controls of the common and environmentally signifi- 
cant chemical species dissolved in water. 

397. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities leading to a Master's thesis in 
Option 1 . 

399. Quantitative Methods in Geo-Sciences. II. 3 HR. PR: STAT 212 or STAT 311, or consent. 
Brief review and introduction to multivariate quantitative techniques as applied to geology and 
geography. 

420. Advanced Topics. 1-12 HR. 

455. Advanced Remote Sensing. II. 3 HR. PR: GEOG 255 and GEOL 255, or consent. Collection, 
processing and classification of remotely sensed data, including optical, thermal, radar, and topo- 
graphic information. (2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab) (Also listed as GEOG 455.) 

491 . Advanced Study. 1 -6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. I, II. 1-6 HR. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 
499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



1 42 WVU Graduate Catalog 



History 

Barbara J. Howe, Chairperson of the Department 

202 Woodburn Hall 

Degrees Offered: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy 

The Department of History offers graduate courses in the history of the United States, 
Appalachia/Regional, Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America, science and technology, and in 
public history. Courses are designed to prepare students in historiography, research meth- 
ods, and interpretation. Students can select concentrations leading to preparation for ca- 
reers in teaching and scholarship and as specialists for various branches of government, 
business, and public service. Students in the program are normally expected to pursue the 
degrees of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 

Master of Arts 

Admission Students seeking admission to the Master of Arts program should have the 
equivalent of a bachelor's degree in history. Application requirements include transcripts (a 
minimum of a 3.0 average in history courses is expected), three letters of recommendation, 
statement of purpose, writing sample, and combined scores of 1 500 on the Graduate Record 
Examination General Aptitude Test. 

Requirements This program requires the completion of a minimum of 30 hours of course 
work with at least a 3.0 average and achievement of proficiency in one foreign language 
or a research skill (six hours) relevant to the student's program. All 30 hours may be in 
history, or students may select up to six hours outside of the department. The history 
course work shall include a well-defined core area (selected from the fields listed for 
comprehensive examinations or approved by the graduate studies committee) of at least 
12 hours, including one readings/research seminar sequence. In addition, students are 
expected to enroll continuously in HIST 499 Department Colloquium for at least two 
semesters. Credit for this course does not count towards the degree. Students are also 
required to complete a master's thesis. A maximum of six hours of credit for HIST 397 
Research can be taken for writing the thesis and for fulfilling the 30-hour M.A. require- 
ment. Candidates for the M.A. are required to pass a final oral examination on their core 
area of study and thesis. 

Public History Program The department also offers a 36-hour M.A. with an emphasis in 
public history, intended to provide enhanced employment opportunities to graduate students 
interested in using their education in history in a profession such as historic preservation, 
contract history work, archives, or historic site administration. The public history program 
works closely with WVU's Institute for the History of Technology and Industrial Archaeology. 
This is the only complete public history graduate curriculum in West Virginia. 

Students apply for admission as they would for the regular M.A. program and should 
indicate on their application that they are interested in public history. In addition, students 
should submit a two-page letter of application, which should indicate the student's back- 
ground in history or public history and why the student wants to be admitted to the public 
history program; this letter should be addressed to the director of graduate studies of the 
Department of History. Students may be admitted to graduate study who do not have an 
undergraduate major in history by making up deficiencies in their course work for under- 
graduate credit; these courses may be taken while the students are enrolled for graduate 
classes, or students may be able to test out of some courses. 



History 143 



The public history emphasis consists of 15 hours of public history courses (introduc- 
tion to public history, two methods courses, and a six-hour supervised internship). Some 
courses may be taken outside the Department of History. Public history students are not 
required to meet the foreign language/research skill requirement. Students are required 
to take a 300-400 level readings/research seminar sequence in one subject area in the 
Department of History outside public history. Course descriptions, syllabi, policies and 
procedures, and a list of internship possibilities are available at the Department of 
History on request by contacting the coordinator of the public history program. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Program Students seeking admission to the Doctor of Philosophy program should have 
the equivalent of a M.A. in history. Application requirements include a transcript (a mini- 
mum of a 3.0 average in graduate history courses is required), three letters of recom- 
mendation, and combined scores of 1500 on the Graduate Record Examination General 
Aptitude Test. Students should also include a statement of purpose and an example of 
their written work as a part of the application. 

Requirements Requirements for the Ph.D. degree in history include the general WVU 
requirements; achievement of proficiency in one foreign language or research skill with a 
second language or skill at the discretion of the department; completion of two readings/ 
seminar sequences beyond those offered for the M.A.; continuous enrollment in HIST 
499 Department Colloquium for all full-time students (part-time students must attend for 
at least four semesters); passing the Ph.D. comprehensive examination of two parts (oral 
and written) administered by a committee of faculty members (normally at the end of a full- 
time student's second year of study); preparation of an acceptable dissertation based on 
original investigation; and successful defense of the dissertation in a final examination. 

Fields of Study A candidate must offer a program of study in four fields, at least three of 
which must be in history; the other may be in a related field approved by the department. 
Doctoral students must maintain a 3.0 grade point average to remain in good standing. 
Fields available in the department include but, are not limited to Europe, United States, 
Africa, East Asia, Latin America, Appalachia/Regional, and science and technology. At 
least one field must be in a geographic area outside the major field of concentration for 
dissertation work. 

Dissertation Dissertation work should normally be in United States history, twentieth- 
century Europe, European social history, Appalachia/regional, science and technology, 
or modern Africa. Students working in these areas, either at the M.A. or Ph.D. level, have 
the opportunity to study with adjunct professors and faculty from other departments and 
universities. 

History (HIST) 

200. Greece and Rome. 3 HR. Covers the Minoan and Mycenean civilizations, Archaic and Clas- 
sical Greece. Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Age, the Roman Republic, the Etruscan and 
Carthaginian states, and the rise of the Roman Empire. 

201. Social and Economic History of the Middle Ages, 300-1000. 3 HR. (HIST 103 is recom- 
mended as preparation.) The social-economic crisis of the late Roman and German institutions, 
the Merovingian and Carolingian economies, Pierenne Thesis, and transition to feudal society. 

204. Ancient and Medieval Science. 3 HR. Investigations of the natural world in classical antiquity 
and medieval Europe. 



1 44 WVU Graduate Catalog 



205. The Renaissance. 3 HR. The underlying political, economic, and social structure of four- 
teenth-and fifteenth-century Italy with concentration on significant intellectual and cultural trends, 
including humanism and art, gender roles, state formation and exploration. 

206. The Reformation. 3 HR. Religious change in sixteenth-century Europe focusing on distin- 
guishing theological characteristics of major reformers, the response of the people to these reli- 
gious change and the impact on European politics and society. 

207. The Rise of Modern Science. 3 HR. The emergence of the scientific world view from the 
Renaissance through the Enlightenment. 

208. Science in Modern Europe. 3 HR. Crystallization and generalization of scientific world view 
in Europe after the Scientific Revolution. Emphasizes the mutual interaction of science, society, 
and culture. 

209. Brazil: Colony to World Power. 3 HR. Examines the transition of Brazil from a colony to a 
world power, with special emphasis on recent economic developments, regional diversity, political 
patterns, foreign affairs, and race relations. 

21 0. Modern Spain. 3 HR. Survey of the Moslem, Hapsburg, and Bourbon periods followed by an 
examination of modern political and social forces, the Civil War, and the rule of Franco. 

211. Industrial Revolution, 1600-1900. 3 HR. Focuses on technical, economic, and social changes 
surrounding the Industrial Revolution in England and the United States. Examines also the ex- 
panding effects of the process of industrialization in Continental Europe. 

212. Introduction to Public History. 3 HR. Introduction to a wide range of career possibilities for 
historians in areas such as archives, historical societies, editing projects, museums, business, 
libraries, and historic preservation. Lectures, guest speakers, field trips, individual projects. 

213. France-Renaissance to Napoleon. 3 HR. French history from the end of the Hundred Years 
War to Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo. Focus on the construction of the modern French state, the 
Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and Napoleon. 

214. France Since 1815. 3 HR. French history from the restoration of the Bourbon monarchy to 
the present. Will emphasize the development of a modern industrial society, the revolutions of 
the nineteenth century, the impact of the World Wars, and France's role in the new Europe. 

215. European Diplomatic History, 1815 to 1919. 3 HR. Develops an understanding of the forces, 
men, and events which determined diplomatic relations between the major powers. 

216. European Diplomatic History, 1919 to Present. 3 HR. Scope similar to HIST 215. 

217. World War II in Europe. 3 HR. PR: 6 hrs. History or consent. Impact of World War II on the 
political culture and moral fabric of European societies; emphasis on themes of invasion, occupa- 
tion, collaboration, resistance, survival, and retribution. 

218. Eastern Europe Since 1945. 3 HR. The social, economic, intellectual, cultural, and political 
history of Eastern Europe since the second World War. Special emphasis on the causes of the 
East European revolutions of 1989 and the problems of post-communist transition. 

219. Revolutionary Russia, 1905-1939. 3 HR. Detailed study of the revolutionary era of Russian/ 
Soviet history with emphasis on the origins of Russian radicalism, the upheavals of 1905 and 
1917, and Stalin's "revolution from above." 

220. The U.S.S.R., 1939 to Present. 3 HR. Detailed study of the recent social and political history 
of the Soviet Union. The Soviet experience in World War II, Stalin's last years, and the conflict 
between reformism and conservatism since Stalin's death. 

221. Hitler and the Third Reich. 3 HR. PR: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. Myths and reali- 
ties of Hitler's public and personal life; emphasis on rise to power, party, ideology, and propa- 
ganda techniques; position and policies as fuehrer. 

222. Modern Germany since 1900. 3 HR. The Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and the two 
German states created after World War II. 



History 1 45 



224. 15th and 16th Century England. II. 3 HR. England from Richard II to Elizabeth I, covering 
developments in politics, religion and society, ranging from the War of the Roses to the plague to 
Protestantism and Shakespeare. 

225. History of Modern China. 3 HR. Introduction to modern China (since 1839) with attention to 
China's Confucian heritage; examines in detail the Chinese effort to modernize in the face of 
Western diplomatic and economic pressure; specific attention to China's Nationalist and Commu- 
nist revolutionary traditions. 

226. History of Modern Japan. 3 HR. Modern Japan (since 1868) with attention to the develop- 
ment of Japanese institutions and ideas in earlier periods, especially the Tokugawa Era (1600- 
1868); examines the rapid pace of economic change in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries 
along with the important social, political, and diplomatic implications of this change. 

227. East Africa to 1895. 3 HR. East Africa from earliest times to beginning of European control. 
Population movement and interaction, development of varying types of polity, revolutionary changes, 
and the European scramble for East Africa form the major focus. 

228. East Africa Since 1895. 3 HR. History of colonial rule and movement to independence in 
East Africa. Political, economic, and social changes will be examined with particular emphasis on 
the rise and triumph of African nationalism. 

229. History of Africa: Pre-Colonial. 3 HR. History of Africa from earliest times to the middle of the 
nineteenth century. Particular emphasis on population movement and interaction, state forma- 
tion, and the development of trade in sub-Saharan Africa as well as the impact of such external 
influences as Christianity and Islam. 

230. History of Africa: Colonial. 3 HR. History of Africa from the middle of the nineteenth century 
to the 1960's. Political and economic trends will form major focus. 

231. Seventeenth Century Britain, 1603-1715. 3 HR. The more significant political, social, eco- 
nomic, religious, and intellectual developments of Britain during a century of revolution and of the 
men and women who interacted with those movements. 

232. Eighteenth Century Britain, 1715-1832. 3 HR. The Age of Aristocracy, the political, social, 
religious, economic, and intellectual forces which produced it, and the reasons for its decline 
under the combined impact of the Industrial, Agricultural, American, and French revolutions. 

233. West Africa to 1885. I. 3 HR. West Africa from the earliest times to the imposition of colonial 
rule. Examines social, economic, political developments and interactions, and European scramble 
for West Africa. 

234. West Africa from 1885. II. 3 HR. Abolition of the transatlantic slave trade, imposition of colo- 
nial rule, colonial economic, social and administrative systems, the rise and triumph of African 
nationalism, West Africa since independence. 

241. 17th century Colonial America. I. 3 HR. The establishment of England's American colonies 
and their development during a century of political, social, religious, and economic change and 
the interaction between events in Old and New Worlds. 

242. 18th century America. II. 3 HR. The social, political, and economic maturation of England's 
American colonies, the move toward independence, and the establishment of government at state 
and federal levels. 

245. History of American Women. 3 HR. Examination of the history of American women from 
1607 to the present, with emphasis on working conditions, women's rights, development of femi- 
nism, women's role in wartime, and women in the family. 

246. History of European Women to 1700. 3 HR. History of European women to 1700, emphasiz- 
ing philosophic, economic, and societal sources of women's oppression, women's self-percep- 
tions and their roles in work, religion, and the family and the development of feminism. 

251. African-American History to 1900. 3 HR. Slave trade and evolution of slavery in the New 
World. The attack on slavery and its destruction, the South and the blacks during Reconstruction, 
and the age of Reaction and Racism, 1875 — 1900. 



1 46 WVU Graduate Catalog 



252. African-American History Since 1900. 3 HR. Reconstruction, the age of reaction and racism, 
black migration, black nationalism, blacks in the world wars, and desegregation. 

253. Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 HR. Causes as well as constitutional and diplomatic aspects 
of the Civil War; the role of the American black in slavery, in war, and in freedom; and the eco- 
nomic and political aspects of Congressional Reconstruction. 

255. Gilded Age in US History. 3 HR. Examines responses of the American people and institutions 
to opportunities and problems of the late nineteenth century. Emphasis on rise of big business; 
labor organization; immigration; regular, reform, and radical politics; disappearance of the fron- 
tier; farm crisis; and origins of imperialism. 

257. The United States From McKinley to the New Deal, 1896 To 1933. 3 HR. American national 
history from William McKinley to Franklin D. Roosevelt. Particular attention is given to great changes 
in American life after 1896; national political, economic, social, and cultural development; the 
Progressive Era in American politics; and alterations in American foreign relations resulting from 
the Spanish-American War and World War I. 

259. United States History, New Deal to Great Society. 3 HR. Covers New Deal, World War II; 
Cold War, with emphasis on American social, political, technological, and cultural developments; 
United States' domestic problems and foreign relations from 1945 to 1968. 

263. American Diplomacy to 1941. 3 HR. PR: None. HIST 52 and 53 recommended. American 
foreign policy and diplomacy from the adoption of the Constitution to America's entry into World 
Warll. 

264. American Diplomacy since 1941. 3 HR. PR: None, HIST 52 and 53 recommended. America's 
foreign policy and growing involvement in international relations including the U.S. role in World 
War II, Korean War, and Vietnam. 

265. The Vietnam War. II. 3 HR. United States' participation in the 1 946-1 975 fighting in Indochina. 
United States' involvement in the political and military conflict, and the impact of the war on the 
United States. 

266. American Economic History to 1865. 3 HR. Origins and development of American business, 
agricultural, and labor institutions; problems, and policies, from 1600 to 1865; influence of eco- 
nomic factors upon American history during this period. 

267. American Economic History Since 1865. 3 HR. Scope similar to that stated for HIST 266. 

268. The Old South. 3 HR. (For advanced undergraduate and graduate students.) History of the 
South-exploring peculiar differences that led to an attempt to establish a separate nation. The 
geographical limitation permits a detailed study of economic and social forces within the context 
of the larger national history. 

269. The New South. 3 HR. Integration of the South into the nation after the Civil War. Emphasis 
on southern attitudes toward industrialization, commercial agriculture, organized labor, and the 
African American. Special attention to the southern literary renaissance and conservative and 
progressive politics of the southern people. 

273. Appalachian Regional History. 3 HR. Historical survey of Central Appalachia's three phases 
of development: traditional society of the nineteenth century, the transformation of a mountain 
society by industrialization at the turn of the twentieth century, and contemporary Appalachia. 

274. The City in American History. 3 HR. A survey of urban history in the United States, including 
the colonial period, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing on physi- 
cal development of cities (planning, transportation, architecture, surburbanization) and social 
history. 

289. Introduction to Historic Preservation. 3 HR. Introduction to historic preservation issues, 
including law, economics, not-for-profit organizations, site interpretation, architectural history, 
industrial archeology, federal programs, downtown revitalization, and landmarks commissions. 

290. Introduction to Historical Research. 3 HR. (Required for history majors; non-majors by con- 
sent.) Introduction to research techniques useful for history. Instruction in locating sources, taking 
notes, and writing research papers. 

History 147 



301 . Readings in Medieval History. 3 HR. Examination of the literature, bibliography, sources, and 
research methods on selected problems in medieval history, using discussion and written reports 
on assigned readings. May be repeated once. 

305. Readings in English History. 3 HR. Directed readings of scholarly books and articles, prima- 
rily in the history of England from about 1450 to about 1700, but with some opportunity for stu- 
dents to fill gaps in their knowledge of other periods of English history. May be repeated once. 

309. Readings in Central European History. 3 HR. All students will read and discuss selected 
works illustrating outstanding scholarship or interpretative problems related to fifteenth-, sixteenth, 
and early seventeenth-century history. In addition, opportunity will be provided for each student to 
pursue an independent reading project tailored to the student's special interests. May be 
repeated once. 

310. Historic Site Interpretation and Preservation. 3 HR. PR: HIST 212. Introduction to historic 
site interpretation and preservation, including establishing criteria, site inventory, and recording 
techniques using the "case study" method. Lectures, films, discussions, and field projects will 
introduce students to the rapidly growing area, including environmental impact work. 

311. Archival Management. 3 HR. PR: HIST 21 2. Principles and practices of archival work within 
a laboratory context. Includes lectures and selected readings illustrated by holdings and policies 
of West Virginia and Regional History Collection of the WVU Library. 

312. Practicum in Historical Editing. 3 HR. PR: HIST 212. Principles and practices of historical 
editing in a laboratory context. Includes lectures and readings with illustrations from ongoing 
editing projects. 

313. Local History Research Methodology. 3 HR. Emphasis on research methods applicable to 
any locality; includes legal records, oral records, secondary sources, photographs, maps, and 
government documents. 

314. Readings in Eastern European History. 3 HR. Intensive readings on specific topics in 
Russian, Soviet or East European history. Students should normally have had History 117 and 
1 1 8, or their equivalents. Primarily designed for graduate students and selected undergraduates. 
May be repeated once. 

317. Readings in Western European History. 3 HR. This course, primarily for graduate students 
and selected undergraduates, is designed for an intensive reading program on special problems 
in western European history. May be repeated once. 

321. Readings in Asian History. 3 HR. Intensive readings in the history of East Asia (especially 
China and Japan) since the nineteenth century; students should normally have had HIST 225 and 
226, or their equivalents; reviews, as well as bibliographical and historiographical essays, re- 
quired. May be repeated once. 

325. Readings in African History. 3 HR. This course will normally focus on readings and discus- 
sion on problems in the history of pre-colonial Africa, the major works in African history, and 
recent interpretations in the field. May be repeated once. 

330. Readings in Latin American History. 3 HR. PR: Graduate status. Critical examination of 
selected sources and topics for understanding and interpreting Latin American history. May be 
repeated once. 

331 . Readings in American History, 1585-1763. 3 HR. Supervised readings and reports designed 
to prepare students for intensive study in a seminar or for field examinations in colonial American 
history. May be repeated once. 

345. Readings in American Labor History. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Readings seminar designed to 
provide a broad knowledge of American labor and working class history by focusing on concep- 
tual issues and methods of research that have shaped the development of this field. May be 
repeated once. 

355. Readings in American History, 1763-1800. 3 HR. Readings and reports designed to prepare 
students for an intensive study in a seminar or field examination. May be repeated once. 



1 48 WVU Graduate Catalog 



356. Readings in U.S. History, 1787-1850. 1. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Critical examination of major 
works and themes on the political, economic, social, and legal formation of the nation. May be 
repeated once. 

359. Readings in U.S. History, 1840-1898. 3 HR. Survey of interpretative literature on Sectional- 
ism, Civil War, Reconstruction and Gilded Age. Assignments are both oral and written reports on 
assigned readings and a critical essay on some aspect of American historiography for this period. 
May be repeated once. 

363. Readings in United States History, 1898 to Present. 3 HR. Readings and class-led discus- 
sion of one paperback book per week, and preparation of a paper based on these books and the 
class discussion of them. May be repeated once. 

373. Readings in Appalachian Regional History. 3 HR. A course for graduate students and seniors 
in the history of West Virginia and neighboring states, which form what is known as the Trans- 
Allegheny or Upper Ohio region. May be repeated once. 

375. Readings in Science and Technology. 3 HR. Examination of the literature, bibliography, and 
sources on selected topics in the history of science and technology. Class discussions and written 
reports on assigned topics. (May be repeated once.) 

382. Readings in Social History of the United States. 3 HR. The objective of the course is to 
establish for graduate students usable frames of reference for selected topics in social history by 
examining the ways in which historians have written about these topics. May be repeated once. 

385. Readings in Environmental History. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Examines broad themes in- 
cluding settlement patterns, attitudes toward nature, the rise of ecological science, and agricul- 
tural and industrial practices. Explores historiographical and methodological issues. May be re- 
peated once. 

391. Advanced Topics. Variable 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not cov- 
ered in regularly scheduled courses. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. Variable 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities 
leading to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

402. Seminar in Medieval History. 3 HR. PR: Hist 301 ; reading knowledge of Latin and a modern 
European language strongly recommended. Directed examination of bibliographic sources and 
historiographical issues on selected aspects of the Middle Ages, leading to preparation of a re- 
search paper based on primary sources. May be repeated once. 

406. Seminar in English History. II. 3 HR. Research seminar in selected topics in English history 
from about 1450 to about 1700. One major paper and extensive reading based on available 
source material is required. 

410. Seminar in Central European History. 3 HR. An intensive survey of the bibliographical aids 
and printed source materials available in the field. A research paper and a bibliographical essay 
will be presented by each student. Reading knowledge of German and French strongly recom- 
mended. May be repeated once. 

411. Internship in Public History 6 HR. PR: HIST 21 2 and two intermediate public history courses. 
A professional internship at an agency involved in a relevant area of public history. Supervision 
will be exercised by both the Department of History and the host agency. Research report or 
finished professional project required. 

414. Seminar in Eastern European History. 3 HR. PR: HIST 117, 118 or equivalent. Research 
seminar on selected topics in Russian, Soviet, or Eastern European history. One major paper and 
extensive reading based on available source materials is required. May be repeated once. 

418. Seminar in Western European History. 3 HR. A research seminar in selected topics in west- 
ern European history. One major paper and extensive reading based on available source material 
is required. A reading knowledge of the appropriate languages is required, if applicable. May be 
repeated once. 

422. Seminar in Asian History. 3 HR. Advanced readings in East Asian history; specific emphasis on 
research tools and techniques; research paper based on English-language sources required; stu- 
dents should normally have had HIST 225 and 226 or their equivalents. May be repeated once. 

History 1 49 



426. Seminar in African History. 3 HR. The seminar will normally focus on eastern Africa in the 
colonial period. Location and use of source materials will be emphasized as well as economic and 
political developments. Students will spend considerable time in research and writing on selected 
aspects of eastern African history. May be repeated once. 

432. Seminar in American History. 1585-1763. 3 HR. PR: HIST 331 or consent. Directed research 
on colonial American history, using original and secondary materials. May be repeated once. 

441. Seminar in Latin American History. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Survey of Latin American historiog- 
raphy, location and use of primary source materials, discussion of research techniques, and the 
writing of a research paper. Reading knowledge of Spanish, Portuguese, or French will be helpful. 
May be repeated once. 

456. Seminar in American History. 1763-1830. 3 HR. PR: HIST 355 or consent. Advanced read- 
ings and research in revolutionary and early national American history. May be repeated once. 

457. Seminar in U.S. History 1787-1850. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Directed research in early United 
States history. Research will include primary and secondary sources. May be repeated once. 

460. Seminar in United States History 1850-1898. 3 HR. Directed research in mid-and late 19th- 
century American history, including guidance in methods of research and manuscript preparation. 
May be repeated once. 

464. Seminar in United States History, 1898-Present. 3 HR. Directed research in recent American 
history including guidance in method of research and manuscript preparation. May be repeated 
once. 

474. Seminar in Appalachian Regional History. 3 HR. A seminar for graduate students in the 
history of West Virginia and neighboring states, which form what is known as the Trans-Allegheny 
or Upper Ohio region. May be repeated once. 

476. Seminar in Science and Technology. 3 HR. PR: HIST 375 or consent. Research seminar in 
the history of science and technology. Discussion of methods and sources; presentation and 
critique of research papers based on primary sources. May be repeated once. 

481 . Special Problems. 1-3 HR. 

482. Special Problems. 1-3 HR. 

486. Seminars in Environmental History. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Directed research involving 
primary and secondary sources. Will focus on regional case studies and examination of broad 
intellectual and policy themes. May be repeated once. 

489. Folger Institute Seminar. 3 HR. PR: Graduate standing. (Enrollment is by special application 
only. Contact department chairperson for information.) Seminar conducted by distinguished scholars 
and held at the Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth Century Studies in Washington, 
D.C. Topics vary. (Also listed as ENGL 493.) 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practices in college teaching of his- 
tory. (Note: This course is intended to ensure that graduate assistants are adequately prepared 
and supervised when they are given college teaching responsibilities.) 

491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced subjects which are 
not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Study may be independent or through specially sched- 
uled lectures. 

492. Directed Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. Directed study, reading, and/or research. 

493. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. A study of contemporary topics selected from recent develop- 
ments in the field. 

494. Special Seminars. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate stu- 
dents. 

495. Independent Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. Faculty supervised study of topics not available through 
regular course offerings. 

1 50 WVU Graduate Catalog 



497. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Department Colloquium. 1 HR. PR: Consent. Graduate students in residence must register 
for the colloquium. Students are expected to enroll continuously for at least two semesters. Credit 
for this course does not count towards degree requirements. 

Humanities (HUM) 

Although humanities has no graduate program, the following graduate courses are 

available. 

290. Special Topics. I, II. 1-3 HR. 

391 . Advanced Topics. 1 -6 HR. 
397. Research. 1-15 HR. 



Liberal Studies 

Richard Montgomery, Director 

252 Stansbury Hall 

Degree Offered: Master of Arts in Liberal Studies 

This interdisciplinary program provides an opportunity for highly motivated students to 
continue their studies beyond the baccalaureate under a coherent program but without 
the exclusive concentration in one discipline. Studies for this degree should focus prima- 
rily on theoretical issues in the liberal arts disciplines such as humanities (English, his- 
tory, philosophy, religious studies, and foreign languages), the fine arts, or the social 
sciences. 

Curriculum 

Each student, in conjunction with a graduate advisor, will put together a personalized 
curriculum centered around some topic or interdisciplinary area of special interest. Top- 
ics might include area studies such as Appalachian studies or French culture; period 
studies such as the Renaissance or the Enlightenment; or some other area of special 
interest, such as women's studies, that will tie together work in several different disci- 
plines. The central theme is essential to the degree program to provide coherence and 
structure; a degree will not be awarded for an unrelated collection of courses. The focus 
provided by a central topic will ensure that studies are pursued in depth, and justify the 
granting of a graduate degree. 

Faculty 

There are more than 750 graduate faculty members at WVU who can be called upon 
to assist students in their individual plans of study. The program is administered by the 
master of arts in liberal studies committee, which is appointed by the program director 
and is responsible for admitting candidates to the program, approving study contracts, 
overseeing the final evaluation, and determining whether degree requirements have been 
met. This committee serves roughly the same administrative function for the master of 
arts in liberal studies (M.A.L.S.) as an academic department serves for more traditional 
degree programs. 



Liberal Studies 151 



Admission 

Requirements for admission to the M.A.L.S. program: 

• Baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 

• Minimum undergraduate grade-point average of 3.0. Probationary status may 
be granted for those who do not meet this standard but who exhibit clear 
potential for graduate work. 

• GRE General Aptitude Test scores that clearly demonstrate the ability to do 
graduate work. 

• Acceptance by the M.A.L.S. committee of a preliminary study plan for the 
degree. 

Application 

To apply for admission to the M.A.L.S. program, the student should simultaneously 
submit an application for graduate admission to the Office of Admissions and Records 
and submit an essay of approximately 1 ,000 words outlining the proposed plan of study 
to the M.A.L.S. committee. This plan must describe the central focus of the study in 
some detail and must include a preliminary identification of course work to be taken, 
along with an indication of how each course relates to the central topic. 

The quality of the admissions essay is one of the primary criteria used by the M.A.L.S. 
committee in making admission decisions. Thus, the essay should be carefully thought 
out and clearly written; it should provide evidence of direction and motivation as well as 
mastery of the necessary writing skills. Another criterion for admission to the program is 
that the proposed plan of study can be carried out at WVU. The applicant should consult 
the course listings elsewhere in this catalog to determine whether the courses offered 
are adequate to the proposed study plan. In some cases, the necessary courses may not 
be available. 

Advisory Committee 

After admission to the M.A.L.S. program, the student will choose an advisor and a 
master's committee with the assistance of the M.A.L.S. committee. The advisor will then 
help the student to draw up a final version of the plan of study, which should include a 
description of the central, unifying theme, a (possibly revised) list of course work to be 
taken, with an indication of the relevance of the courses to the central topic, and a de- 
scription of the final project. 

Special Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements listed in the graduate catalog for all graduate 
programs at WVU, the M.A.L.S. program has the following specific requirements: 

• A minimum of 36 semester hours of approved course work, subject to the following 
restrictions: a. Because the degree is intended to be interdisciplinary no more than 18 
hours can be taken in one departmental discipline; b. No more than 12 hours of indepen- 
dent study will be approved; c. The program must include at least three hours of course 
work in research methodology. 

• A minimum 3.25 grade-point average for all course work in the degree program. 

• Fulfillment of all requirements of the study contract. 

• Successful completion of a final project (e.g., a comprehensive examination, 

research project, a performance project, or master's thesis). 



1 52 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Mathematics 

Larry N. Mann, Chairperson 

370 Armstrong Hall 

Degree Offered: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy 

Master of Science 

Programs are available for students to study applied mathematics, pure mathematics, 
mathematics combined with another discipline, or mathematics for secondary education. 
Entering students should have the equivalent of an undergraduate major in mathemat- 
ics. To be in good standing, a student is expected to maintain at least a 3.0 average (B) 
in mathematics courses and to present at least a 3.0 average in all work offered in fulfill- 
ment of the degree program. 

Advisory Committee Each student, upon beginning a graduate program, will be as- 
signed an advisory committee consisting of at least three members of the graduate fac- 
ulty. This committee will assist the student in designing a written plan of study that takes 
into account the student's interests and needs as well as the aims of the department's 
graduate programs. Later changes in the plan are possible only through mutual agree- 
ment of the student and the committee. 

Programs The student's plan of study is developed in one of these programs: pure 
mathematics, mathematics for secondary educators, applied mathematics, and interdis- 
ciplinary. The programs are designed either for students who intend to pursue a doctor of 
philosophy in mathematics or for those planning to seek employment in education, gov- 
ernment, or industry. Depending upon the program selected, 30 to 33 semester hours 
are required. 

Note: Math 490 may not be counted for credit to satisfy graduate course hour require- 
ments. 

Completion Requirement A student with 1 8 or more hours of graduate study, who has 
completed the basic required courses with a cumulative average of at least 3.3, may peti- 
tion the advisory committee to accept the successful completion of a project in lieu of the 
final examination. Otherwise, all four programs of study require a written final examination. 



Doctor of Philosophy 

The doctor of philosophy is a research program in which the final product is an original, 
publishable research thesis. The program requires students to take 28 hours of course 
work. Areas of focus include number theory, analysis, topology, applied mathematics, 
combinatorics, and graph theory. 

Requirements 

Applicants must have completed a graduate degree similar to the M.S. in mathematics 
outlined above. The following materials should be submitted: 

• A WVU admission application. 

• An application for financial support. 

• Official undergraduate and graduate transcripts. 

• Three letters of recommendation from individuals having experience of an 
applicant's mathematical ability. 

• GRE scores for the general test and for the mathematics subject test. 

• TOEFL scores for students whose native language is not English. 



Mathematics 153 



All doctoral students must demonstrate that they are prepared to undertake doctoral 
work and research by passing an entrance examination, given each year in May and 
August, within the first year of study. 

Twenty-eight hours of course work are required of all doctoral students. The distribu- 
tion of these courses is as follows: 

• Twelve hours at the 400 level in the student's major area. 

• Six hours in each of two minor areas. With the approval of the director of graduate 
studies, up to one course in a minor area may be at the 300 level. 

• Four hours of MATH 496 Seminar. 

Computer Language Proficiency Proficiency in a computer language at the level of 
CS 301 or an approved equivalent is required. Reading proficiency in French, German, 
Russian, or another foreign language, which may be proved through a score of 465 or 
better on an examination given by Educational Testing Service, or through grades of A or 
B in a Foreign Language 306 course, is required. 

Dissertation Committee After the above requirements are satisfied, a student must 
request that the director of graduate studies select a dissertation committee of at least 
five members, with a dissertation advisor as chairperson and one member from outside 
the department. 

Examinations and Dissertation The student must pass a qualifying oral and written 
examination on the major and minor areas of study. If examination results are unsatisfac- 
tory, the dissertation committee may reexamine the student once. 

A Ph.D. candidate must complete a dissertation, representing at least 24 hours of 400- 
level credit, under the supervision of a dissertation advisor. The research upon which the 
dissertation is based must conform to scholastic standards and constitute an original and 
publishable contribution to mathematics. 

Mathematics (MATH) 

213. Partial Differential Equations. II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18. Introduces students in mathematics, 
engineering, and the sciences to methods of applied mathematics. First and second order equa- 
tions, canonical forms, wave, heat and Laplace's equations, representation of solutions. 

215. Applied Modern Algebra. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Finite fields, algebraic coding theory, Bool- 
ean algebras, monoids, finite state, and Turing machines. 

217. Applied Mathematical Analysis. II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18. The algebra and differential calculus 
of vectors, solution of the partial differential equations of mathematical physics, and application of 
functions of a complex variable. 

219. Seminar in Applied Mathematics. I, II. 1-12 HR. PR: Consent. Selected topics in applied 
mathematics. 

220. Numerical Analysis 1. I, II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 17 and a programming language. Computer 
arithmetic, roots of equations, interpolation, Gaussian elimination, numerical integration and dif- 
ferentiation. Numerical solution of initial value problems for ordinary differential equations. Least 
square approximations. (Equiv. to CS 216.) 

221 . Numerical Analysis 2. II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 220 or CS 216 and MATH 241 or consent. Solu- 
tions of linear systems by direct and iterative methods. Calculation of eigenvalues, eigenvectors, 
and inverses of matrices. Applications to ordinary and partial differential equations. (Equiv. to CS 
221.) 

224. Mathematics of Compound Interest. II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 16 or MATH 128. A problem-solving 
course focusing on the measurement of interest, annuities, amortization schedules, and sinking 
funds, and the valuation of bonds and other securities. 



1 54 WVU Graduate Catalog 



228. Discrete Mathematics. II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 163. Permutations, combinations, binomial theo- 
rem, inclusion-exclusion formula, recurrence relations, generating functions, elementary graph 
theory (connectivity, paths, circuits, trees, vertex and edge coloring, graph algorithms) matching 
theory, and discrete optimization. (Equiv. to CS 228.) 

231 , 232. Introduction to Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher. I, II. 3 HR. per sem. PR: MATH 
34. (Not open to students who have credit for MATH 1 31 .) (For in-service elementary mathemat- 
ics teachers.) Systems of numeration; sets, relations, binary operations, the algebraic structure of 
various number systems; the notions of length, area, and volume; coordinate geometry. 

241. Applied Linear Algebra. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 17 and MATH 18. Matrix algebra with 
emphasis on algorithmic techniques and applications to physical models. Topics include solution 
of large systems of equations, orthogonal projections and least squares, and orthogonal projec- 
tions and least squares, and eigenvalue problems. 

251 , 252. Introduction to Real Analysis. I, II. 3 HR. per sem. PR: MATH 163. A study of sequences, 
convergence, limits, continuity, definite integral, and derivative, differentials, functional depen- 
dence, multiple integrals, sequences, and series of functions. 

255. Advanced Real Calculus. S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18. Limits, series, metric spaces, uniformity, 
integrals, integrals. 

256. Complex Variables. II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18. Complex numbers, functions of a complex vari- 
able; analytic functions; the logarithm and related functions; power series; Laurent series and 
residues; conformal mapping and applications. 

261. Mathematical Logic. 3 HR. 

269. Advanced Topics in Mathematics. I, II, S. 3-9 HR. PR: Consent. An independent but directed 
study program the content of which is to be mutually agreed upon by the individual student and 
instructor. 

301, 302. Combinatorial Analysis. I, II. 3 HR. per sem. PR: One year of calculus. Permutations, 
combinations, generating functions, principle of inclusion and exclusion, distributions, partitions, 
compositions, trees, and networks. 

303. Graph Theory. 3HR. PR: MATH 143 and MATH 163. Basic concepts of graphs and digraphs, 
trees, cycles and circuits, connectivity, traversibility, planarity, colorability, and chromatic polyno- 
mials. Further topics from among factorization, line graph, covering and independence, graph 
matrices and groups, Ramsey theory, and packing theory. 

305. Theory of Numbers. I, II. 3 HR., per sem. PR: One year of calculus. Introduction to classical 
number theory covering such topics as divisibility, the Euclidean algorithm, Diophantine equa- 
tions, congruency, primitive roots, quadratic residues, number-theoretic functions, distribution of 
primes, irrationals, and combinatorial methods. Special numbers such as those of Bernoulli, Euler, 
and Stirling. 

307. Topics in Discrete Mathematics. 3 HR. PR: MATH 143 and MATH 163. Topics may include 
algorithmic graph theory, combinatorial designs, matroid theory, (0,1)-matrics, and permanents. 

308. Applied Discrete Mathematics. 3 HR. Topics may include combinatorial optimization, applied 
coding theory, integer programming, linear programming, matching, and network flows. 

31 3. Intermediate Differential Equations. II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 1 7 and MATH 1 8. A rigorous study of 
ordinary differential equations including linear and nonlinear systems, self-adjoint eigenvalue prob- 
lems, non-self-adjoint boundary-value problems, perturbation theory of autonomous systems, 
Poincare-theorem. 

315. Wave Propagation. 3 HR. PR: MATH 251 or MATH 317. Study of waves in applied math- 
ematics. The wave equation and geometrical optics, water waves, exact solutions, and interact- 
ing solitary waves. Basic concepts of hyperbolic and dimersive waves, conservation laws and 
scalar PDE's shock waves, Bateman Burgers equation, and hyperbolic systems. 



Mathematics 155 



317, 318. Advanced Calculus. I, II. 3 HR. per semester. PR: MATH 18. Primarily for engineers and 
scientists. Functions of several variables, partial differentiation, implicit functions, transforma- 
tions; line surface and volume integrals; point set theory, continuity, integration, infinite series and 
convergence, power series, and improper integrals. 

319. Seminar in Applied Mathematics. 1-12 HR. PR: Consent. Selected topics in applied math- 
ematics. Topics previously offered include applied linear algebra, computational fluid dynamics, 
numerical partial differential equations, ordinary differential equations, perturbation methods, and 
stochastic processes. 

320. Solution of Nonlinear Systems. II. 3 HR. PR: CS 220 or MATH 241. Solution of nonlinear 
systems of equations. Newton and Secant Methods. Unconstrained optimization. Nonlinear 
overrelaxation techniques. Nonlinear least squares problems. (Equivalent to CS 320.) 

321. Numerial Analysis. I. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18 and computer language. Number systems and 
errors, interpolation by polynomials, linear systems, scalar algebraic equations and systems, op- 
timization, approximation theory, integration initial, and boundary value problems. 

322. Numerical Solution of PDE. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18 and computer language. Finite difference 
and finite element methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic problems. Study of properties 
such as consistency, convergence, stability, conservation, and discrete maximum principles. 

330. Introduction to Applied Mathematics. S. 1-6 HR. PR: Calculus. (Designed especially for sec- 
ondary-school mathematics teachers; others admitted with departmental approval obtained be- 
fore registration.) Problem solving and construction of mathematical models in the social, life, and 
physical sciences. Examples illustrating the origins and use of secondary school mathematics in 
solving real world problems. 

333. Modern Algebra for Teachers. I, S. 3 HR. PR: Calculus. (Designed especially for secondary- 
school mathematics teachers. Others admitted with departmental approval obtained prior to 
registration.) Introduction to algebraic structures; groups, rings, integral domains and fields. 
Development and properties of the rational and real number systems. 

334. Modern Algebra for Teachers. II, S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 141 or MATH 333. Further investigation 
of algebraic structures begun in MATH 333. (Emphasis on topics helpful to secondary-school 
mathematics teachers.) Topics include Sylow theory, Jordan-Holder Theorem, rings and quota- 
tions, field extensions, Galois theory, and solution by radicals. 

335. Foundations of Geometry. S. 3 HR. PR: Calculus. (Designed especially for secondary math- 
ematics teachers; others admitted with departmental approval obtained before registration.) Inci- 
dence geometries with models; order for lines and planes; separation by angles and by triangles; 
congruence; introduction to Euclidean geometry. 

336. Transformation Geometry. S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 141 or MATH 333. (Designed especially for 
secondary-school mathematics teachers; others admitted with departmental approval obtained 
before registration.) A modern approach to geometry based on transformations in a vector space 
setting. The course unifies the development of geometry with the methods of modern algebra. 

339. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-12 HR. 

341, 342. Modern Algebra. I, II. 3 HR. persem. PR: MATH 141. Concepts from set theory and the 
equivalence of the Axiom of Choice. Zorn's Lemma and the Well-Ordring Theorem; a study of the 
structure of groups, rings, fields, and vector spaces; elementary factorization theory; extensions 
of ring and fields; modules and ideals; and lattices. 

343. Linear Algebra. II, S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 241. Review of theory of groups and fields; linear 
vector spaces including the theory of duality; full linear group; bilinear and quadratic forms; and 
theory of isotropic and totally isotropic spaces. 

351 . Theory of Functions of Real Variables. I, II. 3 HR. per sem. PR: MATH 181 and MATH 252. A 
development of Lebsgue integral, function spaces and Banach spaces, differentiation, complex 
measures, the Lebsgue-Radon-Nikodym theorem. 

352. Theory of Functions of Real Variables. I, II. 3 HR. persem. PR: MATH 351. A development of 
the Lebsgue integral, function spaces and differentiation, complex measures, the Lebesgue-Ra- 
don-Nikodym theorem. Nikodym theorem. 

1 56 WVU Graduate Catalog 



355. Theory of Functions of Complex Variables. I, II. 3 HR. per sem. PR: MATH 252. Number 
systems, the complex plane and its geometry. Halomorphic functions, power series, elementary 
functions, complex integration, representation theorems, the calculus of residues, analytic con- 
tinuation and analytic function, elliptic functions, Halomorphic functions of several complex 
variables. 

356. Theory of Functions of Complex Variables. I, II. 3 HR. PR: MATH 355. Number systems, the 
complex plane and its geometry. Halomorphic functions, power series, elementary functions, com- 
plex integration, representation theorems, the calculus of residues, analytic continuation and ana- 
lytic function, elliptic functions, Halomorphic functions of several complex variables. 

357. Calculus of Variations. II. 3 HR. PR: (MATH 18 and MATH 252) or MATH 318. Necessary 
conditions and sufficient conditions for weak and strong relative minimums of an integral, Euler- 
Lagrange equation. Legendre condition, field construction, Weierstrass excess function, and the 
Jacobi equation. 

361. Geometric Modeling-Curves/Surf. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18 and linear algebra. Mathematical 
techniques used in CAD/CAM environments, including conies, cubic splines, Bezier splines, B- 
splines rational Bezier and B-splines, interpolation, geometric continuity, and data exchange. 

362. Geometric Modeling-Solids. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18 and linear algebra. Mathematical tech- 
niques used in CAD/CAM environments, including basic primitives, manifold and non-manifold 
solids, Euler characteristic, half-space models, constructive solid geometry (CSG), boundary rep- 
resentation (B-rep), Euler operators, Boolean operations, and data exchange. 

363. Mathematical Modeling. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18 and MATH 213. This course is concerned with 
construction, analysis, and interpretation of mathematical models that shed light on important 
problems in the sciences. Emphasis is on the simplification, dimensional analysis, and scaling of 
mathematical models. 

381. Topology. I, II. 3 HR. per sem. PR: MATH 252. A detailed treatment of topological spaces 
covering the topics of continuity, convergence, compactness, and connectivity; product and iden- 
tification space, function spaces, and the topology in Euclidean spaces. 

382. Topology. II. 3 HR. per sem. PR: MATH 381. A detailed treatment of topological spaces 
covering the topics of continuity, convergence, compactness, and connectivity; product and iden- 
tification space, function spaces, and the topology in Euclidean spaces. 

383. Set Theory and Applications. 3 HR. PR: MATH 341 or MATH 351 or MATH 381 . The course 
concentrates on the typical methods of set theory, transfinite induction, and Zorn's Lemma with 
emphasis on their applications outside set theory. The fundamentals of logic and basic set theory 
are included. 

385. Rings Continuous Functions. 3 HR. 

386. Rings Continuous Functions. 3 HR. 
391 . Advanced Topics. 1 -6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

400. Seminar in Number Theory. I, II. 1-12 HR. 

402. Special Functions. I, II, 3 HR. PR: MATH 18 and MATH 252. Operational techniques, gener- 
alized hyper-geometric functions, classical polynomials of Bell, Hermite, Legendre Noerlund, etc. 
Introduction to recent polynomial systems. Current research topics. 

403. Advanced Topics in Graph Theory. 3 HR. PR: MATH 303. Topics may include: Algebraic 
graph theory, random graph theory, external graph theory, topological graph theory, and structural 
graph theory. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) 

405, 406. Analytic Number Theory. I, II. 3 HR., per sem. PR: MATH 306 and MATH 356. Selected 
topics in analytic number theory such as the prime number theorem, primes in an arithmetical 
progression, the Zeta function, the Goldbach conjecture. 



Mathematics 157 



407. Advanced Topics in Combinatorics. 3 HR. PR: MATH 301 and Math 307. Topics may include: 
Combinatorics on fine sets, probabilistic methods in combinatorics, enumerations, Polya Theory, 
combinatorial matrix theory, coding theory, combinatorial identities, infinite combinatorics, trans- 
versal theory, and matriod theory. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) 

414. Asymptotic Methods. 3 HR. PR: MATH 313. Study of asymptotic methods for differential 
equations. Basic concepts - asymptotic expansions, asymptotic approximation; asymptotic evalu- 
ations of integrals -Laplace's methods, Kelvin's methods, the steepest descent; asymptotic solu- 
tions of equations; perturbation of eigenvectors; the difference between singular and regular per- 
turbations; multiple scale analysis; the method of matched asymptotic expansions; perturbations 
of periodic systems. 

441. Group Theory. 3 HR. 

442. Group Theory. 3 HR. 

443. Algebraic Theory Semigroup. 3 HR. 

444. Algebraic Theory Semigroup. 3 HR. 

450. Seminar in Analysis. 1-12 HR. 

451. Functional Analysis. I, II. 3 HR., per sem. PR: MATH 181 and MATH 241 and MATH 252. A 
study of Banach and Hilbert spaces; the Hahn-Banach theorem, uniform boundedness principle, 
and the open mapping theorem; dual spaces and the Riesz representation theorem; Banack 
algebras; and special theory. 

452. Functional Analysis. I. 3 HR. PR: MATH 451. A study of Banach and Hilbert spaces; the 
Hahn-Banach theorem, uniform boundedness principle, and the open mapping theorem; dual 
spaces and the Riesz representation theorem; Banach algebras; and special theory. Clgebras; 
and special theory. 

457. Theory of Partial Differential Equations. I, II. 3 HR. per sem. PR: MATH 252. Cauchy-Kowaleski 
theorem, Cauchy's problem, the Dirichlet and Neumann problems, Dirichlet's principle, potential 
theory, integral equations, eigenvalue problems, numerical methods. 

458. Theory of Partial Differential Equations. II. 3 HR. per sem. PR: MATH 457. Cauchy-Kowaleski 
theorem, Cauchy's problem, the Dirichlet and Neumann problems, Dirichlet's principle, potential 
theory, integral equations, eigenvalue problems, numerical methods. 

460. Thesis. I, II. 1-6 HR. 

480. Seminar in Topology. 1-12 HR. 

481 , 482. Continuum Theory. I, II. 3 HR., per sem. PR: MATH 381 . The fundamental properties of 
continua (compact, connected, metric spaces), including boundary bumping, space filling curves, 
structure of special continua, and inverse limits. 

483. Set Theory and Applications. 3 HR. PR: MATH 383. The course elaborates on the applica- 
tions of the transfinite induction, and combines recursion methods with other elements of modern 
set theory, including the use of additional axioms of set theory, introduction to the forcing method. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practices in college teaching of 
mathematics. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced subjects which are 
not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Study may be independent or through specially sched- 
uled lectures. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 
495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

1 58 WVU Graduate Catalog 



496. Graduate Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one 
seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of the student's program. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking 
course work credit but who wish to meet residence requirements, use the University's facilities, 
and participate in its academic and cultural programs. 

Philosophy (PHIL) 

Although philosophy has no graduate program, the following graduate courses are 

available. 

230. Philosophy and Culture Criticism. I. 3 HR. PR: 3 hours of philosophy at 100-level or above, 
or consent. Recent philosophical analyses and critiques of modern Western culture; its relation- 
ship to discursive, social, economic, disciplinary, and gendering practices. 

253. Philosophy of Mathematics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHIL 106 or consent. Contemporary viewpoints 
in the foundations of mathematics. (Not offered every year.) 

283. Philosophy of History. I, II. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. in philosophy or history major or consent. Theo- 
retical problems such as the nature of historical explanation, relativism, and the status of specu- 
lative principles of history. (Not offered every year.) 

285. Philosophy of Language. I, II. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. in philosophy or linguistic or language major 
or consent. Philosophical problems concerning the nature of meaning and language. (Not offered 
every year.) 

290. Directed Studies. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Instructor's written con- 
sent. Individually supervised reading, research, and projects. 

292. Advanced Topics in Philosophy. I, II. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. in philosophy or consent. Advanced 
philosophical investigation of selected problems and issues. Topics will vary. 

302. Philosophy of Science. I, II. 3 HR. Philosophical problems associated with the concepts and 
methodology of science. (Not offered every year.) 

303. Theory of Knowledge. I, II. 3 HR. Definitions of knowledge, truth, and belief. Problems asso- 
ciated with skepticism, induction, perception, introspection, memory, and a priori knowledge. 

304. Health Care Ethics. I, II. 3 HR. Topics: Clinician-patient relationship, life-sustaining treat- 
ment, physician-assisted death, physician/nurse conflicts, confidentiality, research, reproductive 
technology, abortion, maternal/fetal conflicts, genetics, rationing, and access. 

305. History of Philosophy. I, II. 3 HR. Selected topics in the history of Western philosophy, usu- 
ally with concentration on one of the following periods: ancient, medieval, modern, or recent. 

306. Metaphysics. I, II. 3 HR. Traditional problems associated with universals and particulars, 
reality and experiences, causality, space and time, matter and mind, the nature of the self, etc. 

308. Ethics of the Marketplace. I, II. 3 HR. An examination of moral questions regarding the 
evaluation of economic systems, labor/management relationships, product liability, advertising, 
codes of conduct, and conflicts of interest. (Not offered every year.) 

310. Ethics. I, II. 3 HR. An examination of selected theoretical and applied problems in the field of 
professional ethics. (Not offered every year.) 

313. Philosophy of Social Science. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Philosophical problems associated 
with the concepts and methodology of the social sciences. 

321 . Seminar: Selected Topics. 3-9 HR. 

391 . Advanced Topics. I, II, S. 1 -6 HR. 



Philosophy 1 59 



397. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (M.A. Research or Thesis) PR: Consent. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491 . Advanced Study. 1 -6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



Physics 

Larry E. Halliburton, Chairperson of the Department 

209 Hodges Hall 

Degrees Offered: Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy 

The graduate program is designed to provide a solid background in classical and 
modern physics, a broad understanding of major research fields, and concentrated 
research experience in one area. Applicants normally enter with a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Physics. A student whose background is weak in a particular area is encour- 
aged to register for the appropriate undergraduate course. The normal first-year courses 
include Introduction to Mathematical Physics (387), Quantum Mechanics (351), Ad- 
vanced Classical Mechanics (331), Advanced Electricity and Magnetism (333), plus 
possible electives. In courses no distinction is made between those students who in- 
tend a terminal M.S. degree and those who will pursue a Ph.D. degree. The minimum 
grade for credit in graduate courses is C and a grade point average of 3.0 must be 
maintained. 

Qualifying Examinations 

After the first year of classes students begin taking the written qualifying exams, 
which determine their admission to the M.S. or Ph.D. programs. The purpose of these 
exams is to ensure that each student has the necessary fundamental background to 
begin research. There are three parts to the exam but the three parts are spread over 
the calendar year to allow students to prepare for one section at a time. The June 
exam, which covers Quantum Mechanics, is normally taken after one year of classes. It 
is followed in August by the Classical Mechanics exam, and in January by the Electric- 
ity and Magnetism exam. Students do not have to take the exams in the above order. 
There is no restriction on retaking any of the exams. A different standard of perfor- 
mance is required for candidacy to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, as explained below. 



1 60 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Master of Science 

Students who pass two sections of the qualifying examination at the 40 percent level 
are admitted to candidacy for the M.S. degree. A faculty advisor directs the student's 
research. The research results must be summarized in a written thesis that is defended 
before a faculty committee. The M.S. degree requires 24 hours of courses at the 300 
level or above, including Physics 331 , 333, 351 , 383, and 387. 

A student may instead earn an M.S. degree without doing thesis research by passing 
all three sections of the qualifying examination at the 60 percent level and by taking 30 
hours of courses at the 300 level or above, including Physics 331 , 333, 351 , 383, and 
387. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Students who pass all three sections of the qualifying examination at the 60 percent 
level are admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. Research is the central focus of 
the degree and is directed by a faculty advisor. Early in the research program the stu- 
dent must make an oral presentation to the dissertation committee reviewing some of 
the published research in his/her subfield of specialization. When the student's research 
is completed it is described in a written dissertation and defended before the disserta- 
tion committee. The average completion time for the Ph.D. is five years beyond the 
B.S. The Ph.D. degree requires 36 hours of course work at the 300 level or above, with 
a minimum of 6 hours at the 400 level. 

Research Groups 

Research groups consist of a professor and several graduate students and/or post- 
doctoral fellows, with financial support from a federal agency or private industry. Depart- 
mental research specialties include condensed matter physics (theory and experiment), 
nonlinear dynamics (theory and experiment), applied physics (theory and experiment), 
plasma physics (experiment), astrophysics (theory), and elementary particle physics (theory). 

GRE/TOEFL 

Applicants are expected to have a bachelor's degree in physics, with upper-division 
courses in electricity and magnetism, mechanics, quantum mechanics, thermodynam- 
ics, and mathematical methods. Students lacking some of these courses may be admit- 
ted provisionally and will be allowed to remedy the deficiencies by taking the appropriate 
courses. The GRE general test is required and the GRE physics subject test is strongly 
recommended. If English is not the student's native language, TOEFL scores are also 
required. Application deadline is February 1 5; contact the department for additional infor- 
mation. 

Financial Aid 

With rare exceptions, all students who are admitted receive financial support. Begin- 
ning students usually receive teaching assistantships; more advanced students receive 
research assistantships. Several fellowships are available for outstanding students, al- 
lowing full-time concentration on course work and research and more rapid progress 
toward the degree. 

Physics (PHYS) 

201. Special Topics. I, II. 1-3 HR. persem. (Maybe repeated to max. of 24 hours.) Study of topics 
of current interest in physics. 

213. Introductory Electronics. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 11 and PHYS 12. Principles and applications of 
integrated circuits and digital electronics. 2 HR. lee, 1 HR. lab. 



Physics 161 



221. Optics. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 11 and PHYS 12 and MATH 18. A basic course in physical optics 
covering wave mathematics, propagation, polarization, interference, and diffraction; applications 
in geometrical optics and selected topics in scattering and quantum optics. 3 HR. lee. 

225. Atomic Physics. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 1 24 or equiv. Relativistic mechanics, atomic structure, and 
spectra. 

231. Theoretical Mechanics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 11 and PHYS 12 or equiv.; Cone,: MATH 18. 
Scalar, vector, and tensor fields; curvilinear coordinate systems. Kinematics and dynamics of 
particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation. Relativ- 
istic motion. 

232. Theoretical Mechanics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 231 or equiv.; Cone: MATH 18. Scalar, vector 
and tensor fields; curvilinear coordinate systems. Kinematics and dynamics of particles, systems 
of particles and rigid bodies. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation. Relativistic motion. 

233. Electricity and Magnetism. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 11 and PHYS 12 or equiv., Cone: MATH 18. 
Electrostatics, electrostatics in matter, magnetostatics, magnetostatics in matter, Maxwell's equa- 
tions, reflection and refraction, wave guides and cavities. 

234. Electricity and Magnetism. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 233 or equiv., Cone: MATH 18. Electrostat- 
ics, electrostatics in matter, magnetostatics, magnetostatics in matter, Maxwell's equations, re- 
flection and refraction, wave guides and cavities. 

241 . Advanced Physics Laboratory. I, II. 1-3 HR. per sem. PR: PHYS 11 and PHYS 12 and PHYS 
124. Experiments in physics designed to implement theory courses, give experience in data tak- 
ing and instrumentation, and learn methods of data evaluation and error analysis. 

248. Physics Seminar. I, II. (No credit.) (Suggested for junior, senior, and graduate Physics ma- 
jors.) These lectures acquaint students with topics of current interest in physics. 

251. Introductory Quantum Mechanics. I. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 124 and MATH 18. Fundamental prin- 
ciples of quantum mechanics; state functions in position and momentum space, operators, 
Schrodinger's equation, applications to one-dimensional problems, approximation methods, the 
hydrogen atom, angular momentum and spin. 

263. Nuclear Physics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 124 and MATH 17. Study of characteristic properties 
of nuclei and their structure as inferred from nuclear decays and reactions, leading to a knowl- 
edge of nuclear forces and models. 

271 . Solid State Physics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 124 or equiv. and MATH 17. Properties of crystal- 
line solids; includes crystal structure, interatomic binding, lattice vibrations, electron theory of 
metals, and the band theory of solids with some applications. 

281. Plasma Physics. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 11 and PHYS 12, Cone: PHYS 234. Introductory course 
in the physics of ionized gases; particle and fluid treatment of plasmas, waves, equilibrium and 
stability, kinetic theory, and nonlinear effects. 

283. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 124 or equiv., and MATH 
17. Introduction to the statistical foundations of thermodynamics; applications of the fundamental 
laws of thermodynamics to physical and chemical systems. 

301. Special Topics. I, II. 1-6 HR. per semester. (May be repeated to max. of 24 hours.) PR: 
Consent. (Primarily for Graduate students.) Specialized topics of current interest in physics. 

321. Optics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 11 and PHYS 12 or equivalent; MATH 17. A basic course in 
physical optics covering radiation theory, diffraction, interference, polychromatic waves, scatter- 
ing, polarization, double refraction, and selected topics in quantum optics. 

325. Advanced Atomic Molecular Physics. I. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 351 . A review of the theory of one- 
electron atoms. The main emphasis is on the theory of two-electron and many-electron atoms: 
para and ortho helium; central field approximation; Thomas-Fermi theory; Hartree-Fock theory; L- 
S, J-J, and intermediate coupling; interaction with electromagnetic fields. 



1 62 WVU Graduate Catalog 



331. Advanced Classical Mechanics. I. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 231 and PHYS 232 and differential 
equations. Lagrange and Hamilton form of equations of motion, rigid bodies, small and nonlinear 
oscillations. Transformation theory, relativistic dynamics, and systems with an infinite number of 
degrees of freedom. 

333. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 233 and PHYS 234 and differen- 
tial equations. Electrostatic and magnetostatic boundary value problems. Maxwell's equations for 
time varying fields. Green's functions and integral representations; applications to radiation; dif- 
fraction, wave guides, plasma physics, and relativistic motion of charged particles. 

334. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 233 and PHYS 234 and differen- 
tial equations. Electrostatic and magnetostatic boundary value problems. Maxwell's equations for 
time varying fields. Green's functions and integral representations; applications to radiation; dif- 
fraction, wave guides, plasma physics, and relativistic motion of charged particles. 

351. Quantum Mechanics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 251. Breakdown of classical physics, the 
Schroedinger equation and its interpretation, one dimensional problems, operator methods and 
abstract Hilbert space, identical particles, three dimensional problems, the hydrogen atom, angu- 
larly momentum, spin, vector coupling, time independent pertubation theory, variational principle, 
atomic and molecular structure, semi-classical radiation theory, scattering theory. 

352. Quantum Mechanics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 351. Breakdown of classical physics, the 
Schroedinger equation and its interpretation, one dimensional problems, operator methods and 
abstract Hilbert space, identical particles, three dimensional problems, the hydrogen atom, angu- 
lar momentum, spin, vector coupling, time independent pertutbation theory, variational principle, 
atomic and molecular structure, semiclassical radiation theory, scattering theory. 

354. Outline of Modern Physics. S. 3 HR. PR: One year introductory college physics. (Primarily 
for education majors; not open to physics majors.) Elementary study of atomic and molecular 
structures and spectra, solid state and nuclear physics, relativity and elementary particles. 

355. Workshop for Physics Teachers. S. 3 HR. per sem. PR: One year college physics; One year 
of college mathematics. (Primarily for Education majors; not open to Physics majors.) Techniques 
of apparatus construction and demonstration. 

356. Workshop for Physics Teachers. S. 3 HR. per sem. PR: One year college physics; One year 
of college mathematics. (Primarily for Education majors; not open to Physics majors.) Techniques 
of apparatus construction and demonstration. 

358. Light. II, S. 3 HR. PR: One year of college physics or equivalent. (Primarily for education 
majors; not open to physics majors.) A demonstration course designed to illustrate the basic 
concepts covering light and optics. 

371 . Intermediate Solid State Physics. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 271 and PHYS 351 or equivalent. Crystal 
structure, reciprocal lattice, phonons, dielectric properties, optical properties, semiconductors, 
cooperative phenomena including superconductivity and magnetism. 

372. Intermediate Solid State Physics. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 271 and PHYS 351 or equivalent. Crystal 
structure, reciprocal lattice, phonons, dielectric properties, optical properties, semiconductors, 
cooperative phenomena including superconductivity and magnetism. 

383. Statistical Mechanics. II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 283 and PHYS 351. Ensemble theory, applica- 
tions to noninteracting systems, as well as perturbative and approximate treatment of interac- 
tions. Typical applications include equilibrium constants, polymers, white dwarfs, metals, super- 
fluids, magnetic transitions. 

387. Intro Mathematical Physics. I. 3 HR. PR: Calculus, differential equations, PHYS 11 and PHYS 
12 or equivalent. Complex variables: series, contour integration and conformal mapping; ordinary 
differential equations; Fourier series, Laplace transforms; Fourier transforms, special functions; 
Bessel functions and Legendre, Hermite, and Laguerre polynomials; introduction to partial differ- 
ential equations; Poisson's equation, Wave equation, and diffusion equation. 

388. Intro Mathematical Physics. II. 3 HR. PR: Calculus, differential equations, PHYS 11 and 
PHYS 12 or equivalent. Vector spaces, tensor calculus, group theory, integral equations, calculus 
of variations, nonlinear systems, and other topics as time permits. 



Physics 1 63 



391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

401 . Advanced Research Topics. I, II. 3 HR. (May be repeated to max. of 24 hours.) PR: Consent. 
Specialized topics in field of physics related to the research interests of the department. Open 
only to students who have completed most of the basic graduate courses. 

410. High Energy Physics. I. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 351 and PHYS 352. Fundamental particle interac- 
tions, field theory, S-matrix expansions, space time symmetries, internal symmetries, unsolved 
problems. 

425. Advanced Atomic and Molecular Physics. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 325. Quantum mechanics of 
atoms and molecules at an advanced level emphasizing the role of symmetry. Necessary material 
on group theory is included. 

463. Advanced Nuclear Physics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 225, PHYS 252 and PHYS 263. Detailed 
presentation of nuclear reaction mechanisms, nuclear forces, and theories of nuclear disintegra- 
tions. 

471. Advanced Solid State Physics. II. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 271, PHYS 325 and PHYS 351. Ad- 
vanced treatment of solid state theory; electronic, vibrational, transport, thermodynamic, and mag- 
netic properties of solids. 

481 . Kinetic Theory of Plasma. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 281 and PHYS 331 and PHYS 334. An advanced 
course focusing on the Vlasov theory of plasma equilibrium and stability. The application to plasma 
waves will be emphasized. 

482. Magnetohydrodynamic Theory of Plasma. 3 HR. PR: PHYS 281 and PHYS 331 and PHYS 
334. Theory of ideal magnetohydrodynamics for plasma equilibrium and stability; emphasis on 
analytic theory in developing the model, describing various equilibria and evaluating plasma sta- 
bility. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491 . Advanced Study. 1-6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



1 64 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Political Science 

Allan S. Hammock, Chairperson of the Department 

316-AWoodburn Hall 

Degrees Offered: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy 

The master of arts and doctor of philosophy programs in political science are designed 
to give advanced training to students who desire careers as policy analysts in govern- 
ment or the private sector or who wish to enter selected teaching or research fields with 
a specialization in public policy (either U.S. domestic or international), American politics, 
state politics, comparative politics, and/or international politics. 

Master of Arts 

The master of arts with emphasis in public policy is offered by the Department of 
Political Science in cooperation with the Department of Economics. It is designed to 
provide students with a broad knowledge of the policy making process and the many 
factors influencing public policies at the international, national, state, and local levels of 
government. A problem-analytic approach, drawn from both economics and political sci- 
ence, is used to develop the ability to comprehend, assess, and evaluate issues, prob- 
lems, and policies in the public sector. Prospective graduates are expected to be skilled 
at gathering and interpreting data, reporting, writing, and analyzing policy options and 
alternatives, and evaluating the intended and unintended consequences of public pro- 
grams and policies. Most graduates will take jobs in government or with private firms 
needing specialists in policy analysis. 

Prerequisites/Requirements Ideally, applicants for the master of arts degree should 
have a B.A. in political science (with a minimum of six hours in economics) or a B.A. or 
B.S. in economics (with a minimum of six hours in political science). However, students 
from other fields and disciplines are also encouraged to apply. In addition, the applicant 
should have an overall grade-point average of 2.75, and should submit three letters of 
recommendation from faculty familiar with the student's work. All students must also 
submit the Verbal and Quantitative results of the Graduate Record Examination. 

In order to remain in good standing, students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative average 
and receive a 3.0 average in each semester for which they are enrolled. Students who 
do not maintain a 3.0 cumulative average will be placed on probation and will be sus- 
pended if they fail to regain a 3.0 cumulative average in their next nine hours of study. 

Admission Admission to candidacy for the M.A. degree requires that the student com- 
plete a minimum of 36 hours (exclusive of colloquium) in a specialized curriculum offered by 
the Department of Political Science and the Department of Economics. This curriculum 
includes courses in economics, policy evaluation, the policy process, and public policy 
analysis. In addition, students must complete work in political science methodology and 
statistical methods. All students must enroll in POLS 499 Colloquium each semester in 
residence. 

Research The M.A. degree provides an optional research practicum or internship dur- 
ing the fourth semester of work. The practicum enables the student to conduct actual 
policy research in a public agency. The practicum will carry an additional six hours of 
graduate credit. Students may also choose a six-hour thesis option. 



Political Science 1 65 



Examinations Students will be expected to pass final written/oral examinations in 
policy analysis. Students who fail examinations may be allowed to retake them at the 
next regularly scheduled examination period. It is contrary to departmental policy to 
give a third examination. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The doctor of philosophy degree is designed for persons planning careers either as 
policy analysts in government or as researchers and teachers in institutions of higher 
education. Those students who choose to enter the Ph.D. program emphasizing policy 
analysis will receive training appropriate for persons who wish to undertake research 
and analysis on public issues in government, both foreign and domestic. This training 
includes a comprehensive knowledge of policy formulation, implementation, and evalua- 
tion and a thorough understanding of the dynamics of political institutions. A central focus 
of the policy studies option will be competence in research methodology and statistical 
techniques of policy analysis. 

Those students who choose to enter the Ph.D. program with the intention of entering 
the field of research and teaching may concentrate on policy studies or take a more 
traditional curriculum that features four fields: American national and state politics, inter- 
national relations, comparative politics, and public policy and administration. 

Admission Admission to the Ph.D. program is open to students with either a bachelor's 
or a master's degree. Students with degrees in political science, economics, public ad- 
ministration, sociology, psychology, engineering, social work, business, law, medicine, 
or journalism are encouraged to apply. An undergraduate applicant should have a grade- 
point average of 3.0; a graduate applicant 3.5. In addition, all applicants must submit the 
results of the Graduate Record Examination and at least three letters of recommenda- 
tion from faculty familiar with the applicant's work. Admission will be based on an overall 
assessment of the individual's record. 

Candidacy The work of all individuals admitted to the doctoral program will be formally 
evaluated at the end of the first two semesters (at least 1 8 credit hours of study) at which 
time one of the following recommendations is made: (1) admission to candidacy for the 
doctoral degree; (2) admission to the master's degree program in public policy studies; 
or (3) termination. 

The program of each person admitted to the doctoral program is designed in accor- 
dance with his or her career objectives and previous training. A complete description of 
the Ph.D. program and course requirements may be obtained by writing the Director of 
Graduate Studies, Department of Political Science, West Virginia University, Morgan- 
town, WV 26506. This should be done before application to the program. 

Minimum Requirements 

The following constitute the formal minimum requirements of the Ph.D. program: 

Public Policy Option General Option 

Public Policy Core (18 hrs) Public Policy (15 hrs) 

Policy Research Methods (15 hrs) Research Methods (12 hrs) 

Economics (6 hrs) Elective Specialty I (15 hrs) 

Policy Field (18 hrs) Elective Specialty 11(15 hrs) 

Dissertation (24 hrs) Dissertation (24 hrs) 

Total: 81 hrs Total: 81 hrs 



1 66 WVU Graduate Catalog 



In addition to the formal course work, students must also pass written and oral com- 
prehensive examinations in their specialty fields. All course work completed for the M.A. 
at West Virginia University also counts toward the Ph.D. Course work from other institu- 
tions will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. 

In order to remain in good standing, students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative average 
and receive a 3.0 average in each semester for which they are enrolled. Students are 
required to spend at least one year (two semesters) in residence enrolled in a full-time 
graduate program of no less than nine semester hours each semester. All graduate stu- 
dents must enroll in POLS 499 (Colloquium) each semester in residence. 

Faculty 

The Department of Political Science has 18 full-time faculty members. The major 
strengths of the graduate faculty are: policy studies (15 faculty with policy specialties); 
American national and state politics and administration (eight faculty with U.S. politics 
and institutional specialties); international and comparative politics (four faculty with in- 
ternational affairs specialties, including U.S. foreign policy, comparative foreign policy, 
and national security policy); comparative politics (three faculty with comparative politics 
specialties, including development politics, African, Western European, Canadian, and 
Far Eastern area studies, and cross-national political analysis); research methods (two 
faulty with advanced statistical analysis specialties); and policy fields (ten faculty with 
policy specialties in criminal law, development, political economy, energy, environment 
foreign policy, gender, national security, regulation, and social welfare). In addition, fac- 
ulty in the Department of Public Administration and the Department of Economics teach 
courses included in the M.A. and Ph.D. curricula. 

Research 

Graduate students have opportunities to conduct research with the political science 
faculty, faculty associated with the Policy Analysis Group, the Institute for Public Affairs, 
and other research organizations at the University, and with externally funded grant 
projects. Opportunities exist for field experience in various government settings, includ- 
ing the West Virginia Legislature, which annually provides paid internships for graduate 
students in the M.A. or Ph.D. programs. 

Financial Aid 

The department has a number of assistantships and fellowships available for students 
in both the M.A. and Ph.D. programs. Students interested in financial assistance should 
apply directly to the Department of Political Science. Graduate assistants may enroll for 
no more than nine credit hours per semester (excluding colloquium) 

Political Science (POLS) 

210. The American Presidency. I, II. 3 HR. Institutional, behavioral, and societal forces which 
have given rise to the modern presidency; factors which enhance and constrain the exercise of 
presidential power over those constituencies with which the president must interact; the nature 
and consequences of the presidential decision-making process; desirability and/or feasibility of 
reforming the presidency. 

211. Political Parties & Elections. II. 3 HR. Parties and elections in America; emphasis on nomina- 
tion and general election processes, campaigns, the mass media, campaign finance, voting, the 
electorial college, and parties in government. 

212. Appellate Judicial Process. II. 3 HR. PR: POLS 110 or consent. The role of appeals courts 
and judges in American politics. Topics include appellate court organization and processes, the 
quantitative and qualitative analysis of judicial behavior, and the influence of courts on public 
policy. 



Political Science 1 67 



213. American Constitutional Law. I. 3 HR. The role of the Constitution in the American political 
system. Topics covered include the political concept of constitutionalism; the role of the Supreme 
Court in the political process; division of powers among the three branches of government; and 
the constitutional relation between the national government and the states. 

214. Civil Liberties in the U.S. I, II. 3 HR. Issues in constitutional law concerning personal liberties 
against government action. Topics include free speech, press and association; religious free- 
doms; abortion; the right to privacy; due process of law; and criminal procedure safeguards. 

215. Law and Public Policy. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: POLS 110 or consent. Advanced examination of the 
role of trial courts in policymaking, including agenda-setting and policy formulation by courts, the 
outcomes of policy litigation, and the politics of legal reform. 

216. Public Opinion and Politics. I, II. 3 HR. In-depth treatment of the origins, content, and impact 
of public opinion in American politics; political ideology, partisanship, socialization, mass media, 
opinion polls, and survey research techniques. 

217. Interest Groups and Democracy. I, II, S. 3 HR. 3 HR. The role of interest groups in American 
politics, focusing on their distribution and internal dynamics, their involvement in campaigns and 
elections, their influence on public policy, and their place in a democratic system. 

218. The Legislative Process. II. 3 HR. Structure, organization and processes of legislative bod- 
ies; powers of the legislature; detailed study of law-making procedures; and role of outside forces. 

221 . West Virginia Government. I, II. 3 HR. Organization and operation of the state government of 
West Virginia. 

231. Criminal Law, Policy and Administration. I, II. 3 HR. Legal and administrative approach to 
policy issues in criminal justice. Focuses on the criminal law, police, court decisions, and the 
implementation of law and policy in the criminal field. 

233. Politics of Social Welfare. I, II. 3 HR. Questions of poverty and inequality; who are the poor, 
what causes economic inequality, what have been governmental and private solutions to the 
problem of poverty, and what successes and failures have there been in the war against poverty. 

234. Politics of Economic Policy. I, II. 3 HR. An examination of U.S. economic policy, with an 
emphasis on the political considerations that influence policy development and implementation in 
government regulation, taxation, and spending. 

235. Civil Rights Policy and Politics. II. 3 HR. Analysis of the law, politics, and policy related to 
discrimination in public accommodations, voting, education, housing and employment based on 
race, gender, national origin, handicapped status, and age. 

236. Energy Policy and Politics. II. 3 HR. Explores the formulation and implementation of energy 
policy, including a discussion of scientific, risk, technological, economic, and political variables 
affecting policy with emphasis on national security, environmental protection, resource manage- 
ment and economic growth problems. 

238. Environmental Policy. I. 3 HR. Explores the formulation and implementation of environmen- 
tal policy, using both a policy process approach and policy analysis. Includes a discussion of the 
scientific, risk, technological, economic, and political variables which affect policy making in this 
area. 

242. Bureaucratic Politics. I. 3 HR. Analysis of the nature and processes of American public ad- 
ministration (political, legal, economic, and social), including the role of bureaucracy in a democ- 
racy. (Equiv. to PUBA 242). 

244. Administrative Law. II. 3 HR. Administrative powers and limitations, procedures in adminis- 
trative adjudication and rule-making, discretion, ultra vires as a check on administrators, notice 
and hearing, administrative penalties, judicial control, and administrative liability. 

250. Government of Japan. II. 3 HR. Survey of political institutions and governmental process of 
Japan with special emphasis on the analysis of political problems in the post-war period. 

251. Russian/Post-Soviet Politics. II. 3 HR. Survey of politics and government in Russia and in 
the states of the former Soviet Union. 

1 68 WVU Graduate Catalog 



253. Western Democratic Governments. I, 11.3 HR. Cross-national and/or country based analysis 
of selected western democracies. Individual countries analyzed will vary, but may include Canada, 
Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy, and the European Union. 

254. Government of China. I. 3 HR. Survey of political institutions and governmental processes of 
the People's Republic of China with special emphasis on the analysis of political problems since 
1949. 

255. Governments of Latin America. I. 3HR. Comparative study of the government and politics of 
the Latin American states. 

256. Politics of the Middle East. II. 3 HR. Survey of the domestic and international political dynam- 
ics of the Middle East. 

258. Politics of Africa. II. 3 HR. Historical legacies and current political processes of tropical 
African countries. 

261 . International Organization. II. 3 HR. Agencies created since the close of World War II. Some 
reference to the development of international law and the United Nations. 

263. Public International Law. I. 3 HR. Law governing relations among nations, including develop- 
ment of rules, means of enforcement, and conflict between theory and practice. 

264. American Foreign Relations. I. 3 HR. PR: POLS 160 or consent. Examination of contempo- 
rary U.S. foreign policy and its historical, cultural, and domestic political roots. Substantive and 
theoretical issues in understanding foreign relations since WWII, including both continuity and 
change in the emerging post-cold war system. 

266. Post-Soviet Foreign Policy. II. 3 HR. The origins and conduct of foreign policy during the 
Soviet and post-Soviet periods. Emphasis will be placed on the foreign policy of the former Soviet 
Republics. 

267. Latin America in International Affairs. II. 3 HR. Relations of Latin American states among 
themselves, with the United States, the United Nations, regional organizations, and nonwestern 
states. Analysis in depth of the Monroe doctrine and its corollaries and the inter-American system. 

268. Politics of War and Peace. 3 HR. PR: POLS 1 60 or consent. Analysis of great power politics 
in the international system. Examination of theories of war, historical patterns of the balance of 
power, and origins of the 20th Century's major conflicts: WWI, WWII, and the Cold War. 

269. Far East International Affairs. II. 3HR. International relations of countries of the Far East with 
emphasis on historic roots of recent conflicts, the roles of the United States and other major 
powers, confrontation between the countries in the region, and the regional cooperation and se- 
curity problems in the post-World War II period. 

272. Modern Political Thought. I. 3 HR. Beginning with early Marxist thought, this course exam- 
ines the evolution of the concepts of rights, justice, liberty, democracy, and equality from 1850 
through the present, using the works of both classical and contemporary political theorists. 

273. American Political Philosophy. I, II. 3 HR. Major American political ideas and their influence 
upon American society and government from the seventeenth century to the present. 

275. Psychological Theories of Politics. II. 3 HR. Introduction to rational choice theory and various 
psychological theories of politics; application of psychological theories to both international rela- 
tions and American politics. 

299. Special Topics. /. //. 1-3 HR. 

300. Introduction to Political Research. I. 3 HR. Introduction to the research methods and tech- 
niques used in political and policy analysis. Topics include logic of inquiry, research design, mea- 
surement, and survey and unobtrusive research. 

310. Intergovernmental Relations. I. 3 HR. Examination of the politics and policy consequences 
of intergovernmental relations among the national, state, and local governments in the United 
States. Topics include the development of intergovernmental relations, regulatory federalism, and 
intergovernmental fiscal relations. ( 3 hr seminar.) 

Political Science 1 69 



330. Policy Analysis. I. 3 HR. Overview of the field of political science and the sub-field of public 
policy studies. Focuses on the issues and problems involved in studying policymaking, and an 
assessment of policy analysis as a mode of thinking and inquiry. (3 HR. Seminar.) 

331. Economic Analysis of Politics. I. 3 HR. Application of economic analysis to questions of 
politics and public policy. Consideration of problems of public goods, voting behavior, and legisla- 
tive behavior. (3 HR. seminar.) 

336. Politics of Agenda Setting. I, II. 3 HR. Examines the social, economic, institutional and politi- 
cal influences on the development of public problems and their placement on the policy agenda. 
(3 HR. seminar.) 

345. Public Administration & Policy. II. 3 HR. Decision-making and policy development in the 
administrative process. (3 HR. seminar.) 

351 . Politics of Planned Development. I. 3 HR. Political aspects of social, economic, and techno- 
logical change, with special reference to the politics of development planning and administration. 
(3 HR. Seminar) 

355. Comparative Public Policy. I, II. 3 HR. Comparison of public policy stages in several ad- 
vanced industrial democracies with emphasis on various explanations of public policy in these 
countries in different policy areas. (3 HR. seminar.) 

360. International Theory & Policy. I. 3 HR. Survey of theoretical approaches in the study of 
international relations, covering major works in the realist, neoliberal, and foreign policy literature. 
Emphasis on the place of foreign policy explanations within the wider, systemic international rela- 
tions literature. (3 HR. seminar.) 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

400. Quantitative Political Analysis. II. 3 HR. PR: POLS 300 and STAT 311 , or equivalents. Appli- 
cation of a range of statistical techniques in political and public policy research. Includes use of 
selected computer software commonly used in political science and policy analysis. 

401. Advanced Quantitative Methods. I. 3 HR. PR: POLS 400 or equivalent advanced topics in 
quantitative methods for political science and policy research. Methods surveyed include multiple 
linear regression, time-series analysis, causal modeling, and linear programming. 

403. Internship. I, II. 6-9 HR. per semester; students may enroll more than once. PR: Consent. 

410. Judicial Politics, Policy & Law. I. 3 HR. Judicial influence on American public policy with 
emphasis on the political theory of American law, the agenda of disputes, the formulation of public 
policy by courts, and the effects of judicial policy on politics. (3 HR. seminar) 

429. Seminar: State and Local Government. I, II. 3 HR. Examination of selected topics in state 
government and politics. (3 HR. seminar) 

430. Seminar: American Politics & Policy. I. 3 HR. A survey of classic and contemporary literature 
on U.S. politics and policy. Emphasis on how various institutions and linkage mechanisms affect 
the policy process. (3 HR. seminar.) 

435. Seminar: Policy Evaluation. II. 3 HR. Methods and techniques in evaluating public policies. 
Topics include the relation of policy analysis to policymaking; types of evaluation; planning, evalu- 
ations; alternative evaluation designs; measuring program consequences; problems of utilization, 
and the setting of evaluation research. (3 HR. seminar) 

438. Seminar: Policy Implementation. II. 3 HR. Research seminar focusing on how the intentions 
of policy-makers are transformed into programs and policies which have both intended, and unin- 
tended consequences. Topics include traditional implementation studies, neo-institutionalism, 
rational choice approaches, and principal-agent theory. (3 HR. seminar.) 



1 70 WVU Graduate Catalog 



439. Research in Policy Analysis. I, II. 3 HR. Supervised, independent research on a policy prob- 
lem utilizing the techniques and methods of quantitative policy research. Designed for advanced 
students, the research project follows the completion of the department's research methods se- 
quence. 

480. Thesis. I, II. 2-6 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 



Psychology 

Philip N. Chase, Chairperson of the Department 

101-AOglebayHall 

Degrees Offered: Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy 

Programs Offered 

The doctoral degree programs in behavior analysis, lifespan developmental psychol- 
ogy, adult clinical psychology, and child clinical psychology prepare students for ca- 
reers in teaching, research, and/or practice. The professional master's degree in adult 
clinical or child clinical psychology prepares students for work in community mental 
health centers, medical facilities, mental health and mental retardation institutions, and 
school systems. 

Admission 

Students are admitted only at the beginning of the fall semester. Application must be 
completed by the preceding January 15. Acceptance is based on: 

• Adequate academic aptitude at the graduate level as measured by the Graduate 
Record Examination; 

• Achievement in undergraduate course work, with a minimum grade point average 
of 3.0 required; 

• Personal qualities that predict success in graduate study and as a professional 
after graduation; 

• Adequate preparation in psychology and related fields; and 

• Fit between the applicant's interests and the offerings of a department graduate 
program. 

Courses 

Graduate courses in psychology are open only to regular graduate students except by 
special departmental permission. Students in the master of arts and doctor of philosophy 
programs must have a final 3.0 average in all psychology courses attempted. 

Master of Arts Requirements 

Two years of full-time study with a minimum of 48 hours of credit are required for the 
master of arts degree. Six hours of credit may be counted for the M.A. thesis. Students 
who are accepted into one of the Ph.D. programs are required to complete an M.A. 
thesis and will receive the M.A. degree upon completing the thesis and credit-hour re- 
quirements. Students accepted into the professional M.A. degree track in clinical psy- 
chology must complete a specified sequence of courses and complete a six-month, full- 
time internship. Completion of a thesis is optional in the professional M.A. track. 

Psychology 171 



Doctor of Philosophy Requirements 

Students are accepted for study toward the doctor of philosophy degree upon entry 
into the department. Each program requires completion of a specific set of required 
courses and electives (described in detail in the Department Graduate Handbook). Stu- 
dents are formally admitted to doctoral candidacy after completion of the master's de- 
gree or its equivalent, a comprehensive preliminary examination, and other requirements. 

A dissertation and oral examination on the dissertation are required for all Ph.D. 
candidates. Students in the clinical psychology programs must also complete a 12- 
month internship. The internship must be approved by the program and by the director 
of clinical training. 

Non-Degree Students 

Graduate courses in psychology are designed for regularly admitted degree-seeking 
students as part of an extensive program of preparing those students for professional 
careers. Thus, students not admitted into one of the psychology graduate programs are 
discouraged from taking graduate courses in psychology. Non-psychology graduate stu- 
dents must obtain the instructor's permission to enroll in any psychology graduate course. 

Psychology (PSYC) 

213. Directed Studies. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. (No more than 10 hours may be applied to 
the 42 hours of psychology to which Psychology majors are limited.) Individually supervised read- 
ing, research and/or applied projects. 

218. History & Systems of Psychology I or II. 3 HR. PR: (PSYC 101 or PSYC 102 or PSYC 141 or 
PSYC 151 or PSYC 164 or PSYC 170 or PSYC 191) and junior or senior psychology major. A 
survey of psychology from its origins in philosophy, biology, and physics through the early major 
schools of psychological thought to modern perspectives on the science of behavior and its appli- 
cations to human affairs. 

223. Cognition & Memory. I or II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 102 and junior or senior psychology major. 
Theoretical and empirical issues in cognitive psychology. Topics include mechanisms and theo- 
ries of attention, memory, language, and conceptual processes. 

224. Learning & Behavior Theory. I or II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 171 and junior or senior psychology 
major. Advanced course in empirical and theoretical issues in the psychology of learning. 

225. Perception. I or II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 1 02 and junior or senior psychology major. Survey of the 
structure and function of human sensory systems (primarily visual and auditory), perceptual is- 
sues and theories. 

226. Physiological Psychology. I or II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 131 and junior or senior psychology major. 
Advanced study of the physiological mechanisms of behavior. Topics include neural and ecdocrine 
mechanisms of behavior and issues, methods, and findings in behavioral neuroscience. 

242. Prenatal & Infant Development. I or II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 141 and junior or senior psychology 
major. Behavior and development from conception to 2 years. Includes behavioral genetics and 
hazards of prenatal development, as well as sensory-motor, cognitive, language, and 
socioemotional behavior during infancy. 

243. Child & Adolescent Behavior. I or II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 141 and junior or senior psychology 
major. Theory and research on major psychological processes in childhood and adolescence; 
maturation, personality, socialization, sensory, and cognitive development. 

245. Adulthood and Aging. I or II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 141 and junior or senior psychology major. 
Psychological issues in the study of adulthood, with an emphasis on the characteristics of older 
adults. Topics include the psychosocial and biological context of aging, cognitive and personality 
changes from early to late adulthood, psychopathology in later life, dementia, issues in caregiving, 
and death and dying. 



1 72 WVU Graduate Catalog 



251. Social Psychology. I or II. 3HR. PR: PSYC 151 and junior or senior psychology major. Social 
factors that determine human behavior, survey of research in selected areas of social psychology 
and their implications for social phenomena. 

262. Psychological Assessment. I or II. 3 HR. PR: (PSYC 101 or PSYC 102 or PSYC 141 or 
PSYC 151 or PSYC 164 or PSYC 170 or PSYC 191) and junior or senior psychology major. 
Theory and practice in development and use of psychological assessment procedures. Includes 
intelligence testing, behavioral assessment, and interviewing. 

263. Personality Theory. I or II. 3 HR. PR: (PSYC 101 or PSYC 102 or PSYC 141 or PSYC 151 or 
PSYC 164 or PSYC 170 or PSYC 191) and junior or senior psychology major. Theoretical and 
empirical readings in a survey of major perspectives in personality theory, including dynamic, 
cognitive, humanistic, and behavioral. 

264. Psychology of Adjustment. I or II. 3 HR. PR: (PSYC 101 or PSYC 102 or PSYC 141 or PSYC 
151 or PSYC 164 or PSYC 170 or PSYC 191) and junior or senior psychology major. Dynamic 
principles of human personality adjustment. 

274. Behavior Modification. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 171 and junior or senior psychology major. 
Basic principles of behavior and their application to changing significant human behavior. In- 
cludes clinical, educational, parenting, industrial/organizational, community, and other 
applications. 

279. Community Psychology. II. 3 HR. PR: (PSYC 101 or 102, or 141, or 151, or 170 or 191) and 
junior or senior psychology major. Psychological principles applied to treatment and intervention 
at the community level; manpower development, organizational change, and systems analysis. 

281 . Abnormal Psychology. I, II. 3 HR. PR: (PSYC 101 or 102, or 141, or 151, or 170 or 191) and 
junior or senior psychology major. Major categories of behavior disorders; etiology, prevention, 
and treatment. 

282. Exceptional Children. I or II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 141 and junior or senior psychology major. 
Exceptional mental retardation or advancement; organic disabilities having behavioral conse- 
quences, such as cerebral palsy or deafness; and behavior disorders. 

295. Seminar in Psychology. I or II. 3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: (PSYC 101 or PSYC 
102 or PSYC 141 or PSYC 151 or PSYC 170 or PSYC 191) and junior or senior psychology 
major. Presentation and discussion of selected topics. 

297. Honors Investigation & Thesis. I, II, S. 3 HR. (May be repeated for credit; max. credit 6 HR.) 
PR: Junior or senior psychology major and admission to Honors Program in Psychology. Super- 
vised readings and investigation culminating in the honors thesis. 

301. Professional Issues in Psychology. I, II. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) 
Survey of professional issues in psychology as they relate to a particular sub-discipline, topic, or 
issue. 

302. Ethical Issues in Psychology. II. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) The 
ethical standards for psychologists are applied to research and clinical problems. 

303. Legal Issues in Psychology. II. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) Review of 
the major areas in which psychologists interact with the civil and criminal legal systems. 

311 . Research Design & Data Analysis 1. 1. 3 HR. Principles of experimental design in psychology 
including group and single subject methodologies. Topics include: (1) internal and external valid- 
ity; (2) simple and complex analysis of variance; and (3) reversal and multiple baseline designs. 

312. Research Design & Data Analysis 2. II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 311. Inferential statistics, simple 
correlation and regression, multiple correlation and regression, partial correlation, analysis of 
power, analysis of covariance, analysis of variance of designs with unequal cell sizes. 

313. Directed Study. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. Directed reading 
and research in special areas. 



Psychology 1 73 



315. Multivariate Analysis. I. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: PSYC 311. Data analysis techniques in 
psychology with application to typical research problems. Includes simple matrix algebra, dis- 
criminant analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and an introduction to factor analysis. (Equiv. 
to STAT 341.) 

316. Quasi-Experimental Design. I. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: PSYC 311 and PSYC 312. Con- 
sideration of the statistical procedures used with quasi-experimental group and single-subject 
designs. 

320. Experimental Analysis of Behavior. I. 3 HR. Research and theory in the psychology of learn- 
ing. Assessment of traditional and behavior-analytic approaches to the study of positive reinforce- 
ment, aversive control, and stimulus control. Includes laboratory work with animals. 

321. Human Behavior. I. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: PSYC 320. Review of the role of basic 
human operant research in testing the generality of animal-based behavior principles, analyzing 
phenomena that are specific to humans, and extending behavior analysis to traditional psycho- 
logical problems. 

323. Applied Behavior Analysis. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: PSYC 320. Methodological, em- 
pirical, and conceptual issues in the application of basic research in behavior analysis to prob- 
lems of social significance. 

341. Methodological Issues in Developmental Psychology. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Method- 
ological issues in psychological research on the major age periods and the life span. Topics in- 
clude: validity; reliability; age, cohort, and time of measurement; cross-sectional, longitudinal, 
and mixed designs; data analytic methods; ethical issues. 

342. Conceptual Issues in Developmental Psychology. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. History, philoso- 
phies, and theories of psychological development in the major age periods and the life span; 
conceptual issues such as nature-nurture, sex differences, cultural differences, life events, 
rigidity-plasticity, continuity-discontinuity, and competence-performance. 

344. Infant Behavior & Development. I. Alternate years) 3 HR. Evaluation of current research 
literature in the areas of physical, cognitive, perceptual, language, and socioemotional develop- 
ment from conception to approximately 2 years. 

347. Child & Adolescent Cognitive Development. (Alternate years) I. 3 HR. Examination of psycho- 
logical literature on child and adolescent cognitive development. Topics include perception, learning, 
language, problem solving. Social cognition, and others. Research and theory are emphasized. 

348. Child & Adolescent Social Development. I. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Examination of the psy- 
chological literature on child and adolescent social/emotional development. Topics include: 
parent-child, peer, and sibling relationships; effects of marital and family functioning; friendship; 
aggression; and altruism. Research and theory are emphasized. 

349. Adult Development & Aging. I. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Current issues in research on 
adulthood and aging. Issues addressed include societal and biological influences on adult 
aging; theoretical accounts of cognitive aging; areas of positive development; personality 
change; psychopathology; caregiving and family issues; and death, dying, and bereavement. 

364. Child Behavior Modification. I. 3 HR. Assessment, intervention, and evaluation strategies 
appropriate for childhood disorders and based on behavior principles. 

375. Fundamentals of Gerontology. I. 3 HR. PR: MDS 50. An advanced multidisciplinary examina- 
tion of current research in biological, psychological, and sociological issues of human aging and 
the ways in which these impinge on the individual to create both problems and new opportunities. 
(Also listed as BIOL 375.) 

379. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. I. 3 HR. Basic interviewing skills and current problems in 
the practice of clinical psychology. 

381 . Behavior Pathology. II. 3 HR. Advanced study of diagnostic classification, functional analy- 
sis, and experimental research in psychopathology of child, adult, and geriatric adjustment 
problems. 



1 74 WVU Graduate Catalog 






384. Biological Aspects of Behavior. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: Consent. Overviews of the 
areas of psychological investigation that pertain to the relation between biology and psychology, 
including neuroscience, psycho biological theories of personality and development, neurological 
and neuropsychological assessment, psychophysiology, and biologically-based treatment strate- 
gies, including basic psycho pharmacology. 

390. Seminar on Teaching Psychology. I, II. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) 
PR: Consent. Review and discussion of methods and issues in college teaching of psychology. 

397. Research. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. 

411 . Single-Subject Research Methods. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: PSYC 311 and PSYC 320. 
Critical evaluation of single-subject designs in basic and applied research. Major topics include 
single-subject methodology's historical and conceptual bases, its relation to group-statistical meth- 
ods, and its role in behavioral psychology. 

415. Advanced /Experiential: Analysis of Behavior. I. 3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with con- 
sent.) PR: PSYC 320. Selected topics and research issues in the experimental analysis of 
behavior. 

416. Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis. I, II. 3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) 
PR: PSYC 323. Application of research and theory in behavior analysis to social problems; other 
selected topics. 

417. Research Issues in Behavior Analysis. I, II. 3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) 
PR: Consent. Examination of research issues in general psychology from a behavior analytic 
perspective. Topics vary from year to year. 

419. Seminar in Methodology. I, II. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) Current 
problems and techniques in research design, data analysis, and research methods. 

420. Reinforcement & Punishment. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: PSYC 320. Examination of 
theories of response acquisition, maintenance, and suppression in the context of recent experi- 
mental work with animals and humans. 

421. Behavior Theory & Philosophy. I. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: PSYC 320 or equivalent. 
Critical consideration of contemporary concepts, theories, and methods of psychology. 

423. Behavior Analysis Practicum. II. 3 HR. PR: PSYC 323 and consent. Supervised applied 
behavior analysis experience integrated with a seminar emphasizing group solutions to problems 
that individuals encounter in students' applied projects. Progress and final project reports are 
presented and evaluated. (1 HR. seminar; 2 HR. practicum.) 

424. Social Behavior. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Examines current concepts, research, and find- 
ings in social psychology from various perspectives. Focuses on understanding and explaining 
the social context of individual and group behavior. 

425. History & Systems. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Study of the history of psychology from 
its roots in physics, biology, and philosophy. The development of American psychology is 
emphasized. 

426. Stimulus Control and Memory. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: PSYC 320 or consent. Critical 
review of basic research and theory in discrimination learning, stimulus generalization, and memory. 

427. Advanced Behavior Analysis Practicum. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: PSYC 423 or consent. Super- 
vised applied behavior analysis experience in an approved setting. 

436. Topical Seminar: Cognitive Development. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. (May be repeated for 
credit with consent.) Topical seminar on current issues in cognition and learning over the life-span 
or during selected periods of the life-span. 

437. Practicum in Developmental Psychology. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Provides experience 
in a wide range of applied settings. Sites are chosen to accommodate exposure to the entire life- 
span from infancy through old age. Supervising responsibilities are determined by the instructor- 
in-charge in the agency. 



Psychology 1 75 



442. Topical Seminar: Life-Span Development. II. 3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with con- 
sent.) Topical seminar exploring a particular period of the life-span or perspectives on the life- 
span. 

443. Topical Seminar: Social Development. II. 3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) 
Topical seminar on current issues in personality and socialization over the life-span or during 
selected periods of the life-span. 

456. Program Evaluation in Clinical Service. I. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Examines the nature, 
method, and process of evaluative research, especially as it applies to social and behavioral 
treatment and service delivery programs. 

464. Family and Martial Therapy. II. (Alternate Years) 3 HR. Examines both theoretical and prac- 
tical aspects of the assessment and treatment of family and marital difficulties. 

467. Child Clinical Psychology Practicum. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: 
Consent. Supervised field experience in various aspects of delivering psychological services di- 
rectly or indirectly to children. Experience in assessment, treatment, program design, administra- 
tion, and evaluation. 

468. Seminar in Child Clinical Psychology. I or II. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with con- 
sent.) Current issues and research related to a particular area of clinical psychology involving 
children. 

470. Behavioral & Psychological Assessment 1. I. 3 HR. Conceptual and methodological bases 
for behavioral assessment; comparison of trait-oriented versus behavioral assessment; design 
and evaluation of measurement systems, particularly self-report, ratings by others, and direct 
observation, within the basic framework of generalizability theory. 

471. Behavioral and Psychological Assessment 2. II. 4 HR. PR: PSYC 470. Evaluation of clini- 
cally relevant behavior and environments by means of testing and other methods. Includes test 
selection, administration, and report writing. 

477. Adult Clinical Psychology Practicum. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: 
Consent. Supervised practice of psychological techniques in clinics or institutional settings; expe- 
rience in psychological testing, interviewing, report writing, case presentation, interpretation of 
tests and supportive counseling. 

479. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. I or II. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit with consent.) 
Research and problems in clinical psychology. 

480. Clinical Neuropsychology. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Neuroanatomical foundations, 
neurobehavioral disorders, neuropsychological assessments, and psychopharmacological prin- 
ciples and practices relevant to clinical psychology. 

481 . Psychophysiology II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. PR: 3 HR. of physiological psychology or consent. 
The current state of theory, methods, and findings concerning the association of physiological re- 
sponse systems and psychological states and processes, including biofeedback intervention. 

482. Adult Behavior Therapy. II. 3 HR. Reviews the roots and development of behavioral interven- 
tions with adult populations. Applied clinical intervention is stressed in concert with evaluation and 
research application. 

483. Integrative Behavioral Psychotherapy. II. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Conceptual and practical 
introduction to basic tenets, concepts, and techniques of major schools of psychotherapy. Re- 
views psychotherapy integration efforts by analyzing therapy process variables and therapist ac- 
tivities presumably common to many effective forms of therapy. 

484. Introduction to Clinical Psychopharmacology. I. (Alternate years) 3 HR. Survey of the ways 
in which psychotropic drugs are used to treat behavioral and psychological disorders. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. Supervised 
practice in college teaching of psychology. 

497. Research. (Dissertation). I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. 
1 76 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Public Administration 

David G. Williams, Chairperson of the Department 

302-B Woodburn Hall P.O. Box 6322 

Degree Offered: Master of Public Administration 

The Department of Public Administration offers a public administration curriculum for 
graduate students seeking the degree of master of public administration (M.P.A.) or a 
specialization as part of another graduate degree program. This program provides a 
professional orientation to the primary facets of public management. 

Curriculum 

The master of public administration curriculum serves the needs of students from a 
variety of backgrounds who wish to pursue careers in public service. It directs particular 
attention to developing an understanding of the management function in the public con- 
text as well as preparation in utilizing advanced management techniques applicable to 
all levels of government — local, state, national, and international — as well as the not-for- 
profit sector, particularly health and hospital organizations. 

The study program is designed to supply an academic foundation for comprehension 
of the range of processes and management approaches employed in public administra- 
tion. These include public management theory and practice, personnel administration, 
budgetary and financial management, organizational dynamics, legal and ethical con- 
cerns, practically-oriented research, and leadership. Particular stress is placed on those 
functions and issues that require the greatest degree of adaptation, innovation, and re- 
sponsiveness on the part of the professional administrator. 

The curriculum reflects the diversity of skills required by all levels of government. The 
range of needs is broad in scope; students apply from diverse backgrounds, including 
political science, other social sciences, physical sciences, humanities, and from posi- 
tions in public service, not-for-profit, and private sectors. 

General Requirements 

The M.P.A. degree requires the completion of 47 credit hours. The general require- 
ments are listed below. These general requirements can be tailored to individual stu- 
dents' needs with revisions agreed upon by both student and advisor. 

• Integrative seminar (two credit hours): Orientation to professional skills and pro- 
gram content (PA 300). 

• Foundation courses (13 credit hours): Public management theory and practice 
(PA 310), public financial management (PA 320), methods for public administra- 
tion research (PA 330), and legal and political foundations (PA 340). 

• Advanced courses (nine credit hours): Public budgeting (PA 420), applied research 
in public administration (PA 430), and public personnel administration (PA 441). 

• Elective courses (12 credit hours): Selections from a wide range of specialized 
public administration elective courses and elective courses offered in other fields. 

• Internship (nine credit hours): Public administration internship (PA 403) and project 
paper (PA 404). 

• Integrative seminar (two credit hours): Application of course concepts to planned 
change in public organizations (PA 452). 

Degree Completion 

It usually takes four semesters for full-time students to complete the M.P.A. degree. 
Course work can be completed in two semesters and a summer. In addition, the intern- 
ship is generally one semester in length, although a variety of internship arrangements 
are possible. For those individuals who have had substantial public service experience, 
internship credit can be awarded. 

Public Administration 1 77 



Health Care Administration 

Elective courses are offered in health care administration for students who desire to 
specialize in this area as part of the M.P.A. degree. A certificate program is also avail- 
able. Check at the department for details. 

Joint Degrees 

The department has established both joint degree and double degree programs with a 
number of other graduate programs. A joint J.D./M.PA. degree program has been estab- 
lished with the College of Law to provide preparation in both law and public administra- 
tion. A joint M.S.W./M.P.A. degree has been developed with the cooperation of the School 
of Social Work to provide preparation for administrators in the social services. Double 
degree programs may also be arranged with other academic programs and professional 
schools. Graduate studies regulations permit limited credit from one graduate degree to 
be applied to a second degree. Students may pursue two degrees and use approved 
course work for both degrees. 

Recommended Courses 

While many tool skills are included in the required courses, it is strongly recommended 
that students take courses in accounting, statistics, and computer science as part of their 
undergraduate program. Course work may also be taken at the graduate level in these 
subjects (200 and above) and counted as elective hours. 

Minor 

A graduate minor in public administration may be taken in conjunction with other gradu- 
ate degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences. In addition, a graduate minor in public 
administration may be part of graduate degree programs outside the College as ap- 
proved by the graduate committee for that student. 

At the master's level, a minor consists of 12 hours of course work (PA 310, 320, 340, 
and one advanced course). At the doctoral level, 1 5 hours of course work is required (PA 
31 0, 320, 340, and two advanced courses). A grade-point average of 3.0 must be achieved 
for the courses taken in the graduate minor. 

Changes in course requirements within the hour limits may be approved by the 
Department of Public Administration for students with specialized needs or back- 
ground experience. 

Admission 

Candidates must meet the WVU general admission requirements for graduation from 
an accredited college and grade-point average. Admission into the M.P.A. program is 
competitive with decisions based on: 

• Application for admission and transcripts (submitted to the Office of Admissions 
and Records). 

• Three letters of evaluation (forms are available from chairperson of the Department of 
Public Administration), Graduate Record Examination scores for the aptitude test, and 
a vita. These materials should be submitted to the chairperson of the Department of 
Public Administration. 

In the case of practicing administrators, a record of accomplishment in administrative 
performance will be weighed heavily in combination with the criteria outlined above. 



1 78 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Application Deadline 

The deadline for fall or summer applications is April 1 ; Applicants will be notified around 
April 1 5; deadline for January admission is October 1 5; applicants will be notified around 
November 1 . Decisions on applications will be made during these two periods, although 
late applications are considered if space is available. 

Application forms and additional information may be obtained by contacting the chair- 
person of the Department of Public Administration. 

Public Administration (PUBA) 

300. Professional Skills Seminar. I, II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Orientation and overview of public 
administration; M.P.A. program content and expectations; research resources and computer ap- 
plications; professional development activities and public service. 

310. Public Management Theory and Practice. I, II, S. 3 HR. Graduate level introduction to man- 
agement theory and practice in the public sector, including contextual influences, administrative 
behavior and motivation, decision-making, leadership, organizational design, communication, and 
evaluation. 

320. Public Financial Management. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Principles and practices of public 
sector financial management including management control concepts, governmental financial 
accounting and reporting, analytical and managerial techniques and microcomputer applications 
to public financial management. 

330. Methods for Public Administration Research. I, II. 4 HR. PR: Consent. Introduction to the 
foundations and processes of applied research applicable to public administration, with emphasis 
upon data collection and analysis. Use of the personal computer for word processing and data 
analysis is also emphasized. 

340. Legal and Political Foundations. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Constitutional-legal basis of 
American public administration; the policy making process; administrative agency relationships 
with executive, legislative and judicial branches; bureaucratic power and legitimacy; and adminis- 
trative legal process. 

345. Public Administration and Policy Development. II. 3 HR. Policy development examined in 
terms of values, process, specific policy cases, alternative "futures" analyses and policy science. 

403. Internship. I, II, S. 3-9 HR. PR: Consent. A working internship in a government or public 
service related agency, designed to provide students with an opportunity to gain field experience, 
and to relate knowledge gained through course work situation. (Graded S or U.) 

404. Public Service Internship Analysis. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: PUBA 403, consent. Designed for 
students enrolled in PUBA 403. Students undertake in-depth analysis of elements of their intern- 
ship (policy matters, organizational questions, administrative dilemmas, etc.) and prepare a writ- 
ten report. 

410. Administrative Behavior in Public Organizations. I. 3 HR. Introduces and familiarizes the 
student with the nature of individual and group behavior in public organizations and bureaucratic 
settings. 

411. Public Planning. II. 3 HR. Principles and practices of government planning including devel- 
opment and management of policy, political and economic context of strategic planning and so- 
cial planning. 

412. Administrative Ethics and Justice. I. 3 HR. PR: PUBA 310 or consent. Analysis of ethical 
issues in public administration. Study of the concepts of distributive and procedural justice and 
their applications to administrative decision-making. 

420. Public Budgeting. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PUBA 320. Advanced study of public budgeting at the 
federal, state and local levels of government. Emphasis is placed on principles of public finance, 
budgeting processes and approaches; revenue sources and tax structures; and budget prepara- 
tion and analysis. 



Public A dministra tion 1 79 



430. Applied Research in Public Administration. I, II. 3 HR. PR: PUBA 330. Completion of an 
original, quantitative, applied research project dealing with issues and/or problems in the public 
sector. 

431. Information Management in Public Administration. II. 3 HR. Concepts and practice of infor- 
mation management in the public sector; computer applications and their impact on organiza- 
tional performance as well as public accountability, political and administrative constraints, ethics 
and privacy. 

441. Public Personnel Administration. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Concept of merit and ideologi- 
cal roots of merit system; personnel functions in government with emphasis upon acquiring and 
managing human resources, equity, employee and executive development and problems of pa- 
tronage, and employee relations. 

443. Public Employee Labor Relations. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Provides overview of theory, struc- 
tures, and issues of public-sector labor relations; specific knowledge and training in processes 
and behaviors of contract negotiation and contract maintenance; and introduction to conflict man- 
agement in non-unionized settings. 

452. Capstone Seminar: Strategies for Change. I, II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Develops knowledge 
base and techniques for using Public Administration concepts gained in the curriculum to effect 
planned change in organizations and cope with its ethical implications. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Focuses on those subjects of most topical 
concern in public administration. 

492. Directed Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Directed study, reading and/or research. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminar: (topic). II. 1-6 HR. Special seminars arranged for advanced graduate stu- 
dents. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

Religious Studies (RELG) 

Religious Studies courses may be taken for University LSP credit (except RELG 290 and 
491) or for elective credit. Also, an Interdepartmental major in Religious Studies may be 
undertaken. 

290. Seminar: Selected Topics. 3 HR. PR: A previous religious studies course or consent. 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 
397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491 . Advanced Study. 1 -6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



1 80 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Sociology and Anthropology 

Ronald Althouse, Chairperson of the Department 

423 Hodges Hall 

Degree Offered: Master of Arts 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers an emphasis in applied social 
research leading to the degree of master of arts . Students are trained to be able to take 
positions in government, universities, community agencies, and private industry that re- 
quire them to design and conduct research for purposes of evaluating policies and pro- 
grams, documenting social needs, monitoring service delivery, and marketing products 
and services. The program also serves as a good foundation for students who may later 
choose to pursue doctoral studies. 

Admission 

Applicants for admission to graduate study must have a bachelor's degree from an 
accredited institution. Applicants should have their college or university transcripts sent 
directly to the WVU Office of Admissions and Records. Candidates should also submit 
three completed "Recommendation Forms" from former professors, supervisors, or em- 
ployers. Applicants should submit a written statement of why they are interested in the 
program and in a career in applied social research. An on-campus interview in the de- 
partment is encouraged. Scores for the Graduate Record Examination are not essential 
for admission but must be provided before the beginning of classes. Foreign students for 
whom English is not the native language are required by the University to submit Test of 
English As a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores (a minimum score of 550 is required) 
and may be required to participate in the University's language orientation sessions. 

Application Deadline 

Application should be completed by March 1 for admission to the fall semester. Stu- 
dents seeking financial assistance must request and submit a separate applica- 
tion form furnished by the department. 

Remediation 

Students with deficient background in sociological theory or methods may be required 
to do remedial work. Full-time students who are admitted as special provisional students 
are required to complete 12 hours of approved course work with a B average or better 
within a year; students who fail to do so are suspended. The department graduate com- 
mittee assesses all students and determines who will be permitted to continue in the 
program, with or without assistance. Normally, assistance is for no more than two years. 

Degree Requirements 

The 36 hour program requires 30 hours of course work and either the completion of an 
applied research report (six hours) based on an analysis of a social program or policy, or 
a master's thesis (six hours) for students interested in investigating a theoretical problem 
or methodological issue. During the first three semesters, students are required to enroll 
in a series of core research courses. These include survey research methods, qualitative 
research methods, elementary and advanced data analysis, principles of research 
design, and a seminar in applied social research policy. 



Sociology and Anthropology 181 



Options 

The thesis may consist of an empirical assessment of community needs, problems, 
policies, and/or programs or an analysis of a problem in the social scientific literature. 
The student, in consultation with his/her program committee, chooses electives either in 
the department or elsewhere in the University as a basis for gaining expertise in some 
specific area of concentration. 

Faculty 

In addition to instruction in technical skills, faculty furnish an overview of the relation- 
ship between policy and research and provide expertise in a broad range of substan- 
tive areas, including economic development in Appalachia; gender, racial, and ethnic 
studies; the sociology of education and work; criminal justice system; health care deliv- 
ery; injury prevention; community and organizational development; and conflict analy- 
sis and resolution. 

Bachelor of Arts/Master of Arts 

This special option is available to WVU undergraduate sociology and anthropology 
majors with a grade-point average of 3.0. By taking nine hours of specified graduate 
work as elective credit during the senior year, students can complete a 30-credit M.A. in 
only one year of full-time study. However, students cannot hold an assistantship and still 
complete the degree in one year. Contact the department chairperson for more details. 

Sociology and Anthropology (SOCA) 

201 . Sociological Theory. II. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. SOCA and senior standing or consent. Systematic 
analysis of major sociological theories viewed from the historical perspective and in terms of 
current research. 

204. Complex Organizations. I. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. SOCA or consent. The structure and functioning 
of large-scale, bureaucratic organizations, including studies of industrial organizations, prisons, 
hospitals, government bureaus, and the military in contemporary society. 

205. Class, Status, and Power. I or II. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. SOCA or consent. Analysis of various 
systems of social inequality. Emphasis on empirical studies describing social class system, distri- 
bution of status and power, and patterns of social mobility in America. 

211. Social Research Methods. I, II. 3 HR. PR: SOCA 1 or 5 or consent. Logic of social research, 
elements of research design, and problems of measurement, with emphasis on survey research 
methodology and data analysis. 

222. Community Development. II. 3 HR. PR: SOCA 122, or 6 hrs. SOCA, or consent. Application 
of sociological knowledge of structure of communities for planning programs and services. Em- 
phasis on techniques of organizing efforts for community change in developing nations. 

223. Sociology of Rural Life. I or II. 3 HR. PR: SOCA 1 or consent. Social aspects of rural living. 
Characteristics of rural population, social structure, and institutional arrangements: family, com- 
munity, education, religion, recreation, health, welfare, and local government. 

230. The Criminal Justice System. II. 3 HR. PR: SOCA 132 or consent. A sociological introduction 
to the criminal justice system. Analysis of police work, court activities, and corrections within the 
context of American social organization and societal definitions of crime and justice. 

231. Sociology of Law. I or II. 3 HR. PR: Senior standing and permission of instructor. Develop- 
ment and practice of law as part of social systems; theoretical treatments of the relationship 
between law and social order; emphasis on issues of class, race, and gender. 3 HR. lee. 

232. Sociology of Education. I. 3 HR. PR: SOCA 1 or consent. Education as a social institution, 
cultural and class influences on education, social roles and career patterns in the school system, 
the school and problems of the community. (Also listed as EdF 300.) 



1 82 WVU Graduate Catalog 



233. Sociology of Work and Work Places. I or II. 3 HR. PR: SOCA 1 or consent. Explores the 
significance of work and work relations in contemporary society. Emphasis is given to the analysis 
of employment settings including industrial organizations. 

253. Religion. Magic, and Healing. I or II. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. SOCA or consent. Symbolism, magic, 
ritual, shamanism, sorcery, and concepts of sin and salvation related to peasant and tribal 
cosmologies will be examined as causes of and remedies for suffering in traditional and modern 
contexts. 

258. Anthropology of Health and Illness. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. SOCA or Consent. Health and Disease, 
diagnosis, and healing in cross-cultural perspectives; analyses of social, cultural, political, and 
economic factors in modern and traditional medical systems. 

261. Issues in Crime and Justice. I or II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Senior seminar on crime and the 
social organization of justice. Special focus on problems of professionals in prevention, enforce- 
ment, corrections, and institutional reform. Emphasis on recent research, emerging trends, and 
key policy choices. 

290. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. PR: 6 HR. SOCA or consent. Topics change so students may 
enroll more than once. 

291. Honors Seminar. I or II. 1-3 HR. 

293. Independent Study I, II, S. 1-6 HR. persem. PR: 3.0 grade-point average and written depart- 
mental permission. Directed reading or research for students desiring work not available in regu- 
lar course offerings. 

311. Survey Research Methods. I. 3 HR. PR: SOCA 211 and STAT 101 or consent. Provides 
students with an overview of survey research including problem definition, research design, sam- 
pling, measurement, instrument construction, project management, ethical considerations, and 
report writing. 

313. Qualitative Methods. I or II. 3 HR. Provides students with supervised field experiences in 
interviewing, participant observation, and other methods of qualitative data gathering, analysis, 
and presentation. 

317. Data Analysis. II. 3 HR. PR: STAT 101 orequiv. Using social science survey data, this course 
integrates statistics, computer usage, and social science theory to examine alternative methods 
of analyzing social science data. Makes extensive use of SPSS software package. 

318. Data Analysis. I. 3 HR. PR: SOCA 31 7. Continuation of SOCA 31 7. 

319. Microcomputer Applications. I. 1 HR. A directed tutorial in selected social science applica- 
tions of microcomputer use with emphasis on production of research reports. (SOCA majors only.) 

322. Contemporary Sociological Theory. II. 3 HR. Review of recent trends and orientations in 
sociology. Theory construction, topologies, mathematical models, and the relationship between 
theory and research. Review of current literature. 

390. Special Topics. I, II. 1 -3 HR. A graduate course offered as the need arises. Topics change so 
students may enroll more than once. 

391. Seminar. I. II. 3-9 HR. 

393. Independent Study. I, II, S. 1-9 HR. PR: Written departmental consent. Directed reading and/ 
or research in a specialized area of interest. 

394. Thesis or Applied Problem Research. I. II, S. 6 HR. 

395. Field Work. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Departmental consent. Supervised field work. 
490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 



Sociology and Anthropology 1 83 



Statistics 

E. James Harner, Chairperson of Department 

207 Knapp Hall 

Degree Offered: Master of Science 

The Department of Statistics offers a master of science with a major in statistics. The 
Department also offers a minor in statistics as an option for both master of science and 
doctor of philosophy Eberly College of Arts and Sciences degree programs. The mas- 
ter of science degree is intended to qualify the student to assume a professional role in 
an educational, industrial, or governmental research project; to teach in a college; or to 
undertake advanced training toward a doctorate in statistics or one of the quantitative 
fields of science. 

Because many students receive baccalaureate degrees from colleges which do not 
offer undergraduate programs in statistics and because historically statistics has been 
primarily a field of graduate education, a student does not need a degree in statistics to 
enter the M.S. degree program in statistics. A good background in mathematics, sci- 
ence, or engineering is reasonable preparation for graduate work in statistics. 



Master of Science 

Options The following two options are available for students seeking a master of 
science in statistics: 

• Problem Report Option— at least 36 hours of course work including three hours of 
credit for a problem report; 

• Thesis Option— at least 36 hours of course work including six hours of credit for a 
thesis. 

Prerequisites Students are expected to know the material contained in the following 
courses or areas upon admission to the program. Otherwise, these deficiencies must 
be removed as early as possible in the student's degree program under the terms 
specified by the Admissions and Standards Committee. 

• Single and multivariate calculus (MATH 15, 16, 17 or equiv.); 

• Linear or matrix algebra (MATH 241 or equiv.); 

• Probability and statistics (STAT 201 or equiv.); 

• Knowledge of a high-level programming language. 
Required Courses Minimum requirements for either option are: 

• STAT 31 2, 313, 351,361,362; 

• Nine hours from STAT 331 , 341 , 381 , 385, 451 ; 

• STAT 390, 392, 396, 397. 

Credit towards the degree requirements is not given for STAT 311. Students must 
complete at least one hour of credit for STAT 390, 392, and 396 and at least three hours 
of credit for STAT 397. Students are expected to attend the graduate seminar every 
semester even if they are not registered for STAT 396. A grade of C or better and a 
minimum 2.75 GPA is required for courses fulfilling a major in statistics. 

Examinations Students must pass two written comprehensive examinations on foun- 
dation material and a final oral examination on the thesis or problem report. One com- 
prehensive examination covers the theory taught in STAT 361 and 362; the other 
covers the applications taught in STAT 312, 313, and 351 . These written examinations 
are normally given in the first four weeks of the semester in which the student expects 
to graduate. The final oral examination is a defense of the graduate research project 

1 84 WVU Graduate Catalog 



required of all students, and it is usually given within four weeks after the student has 
presented an acceptable copy of the thesis or report to the advisor and graduate 
committee. 

More information concerning graduate studies may be found in Graduate Programs 
in Statistics available from the Department of Statistics. 

Minor in Statistics 

Master's Level Any student pursuing a master's degree in the Eberly College of Arts 

and Sciences may complete a minor in statistics by completing one of the following 

options: 

Minor in Applied Statistics 

• Knowledge of a high-level programming language; 

• Nine hours from STAT 312, 31 3, 331 , 341 , 351 , 361 , 362, 381 , 385, 451 . 

A grade of C or better and a minimum 2.75 GPA is required for courses fulfilling a 
minor in statistics. A statistics faculty member must be on the student's graduate com- 
mittee. The student must make a significant application of statistics in his/her problem 
report/thesis or demonstrate the ability to apply statistical techniques to a research 
problem. 

Minor in Mathematical Statistics 

• MATH 15, 16, 17, and knowledge of a high-level programming language; 

• STAT 361, 362; 

• Six hours from STAT 31 2, 31 3, 331 , 341 , 351 , 381 , 385, 451 . 

A grade of C or better and a minimum 2.75 GPA is required for courses fulfilling a 
minor in statistics. 

Doctoral Level A student pursuing a doctor of philosophy in the Eberly College of Arts 
and Sciences may complete a minor in statistics by completing one of the following 
options: 

Minor in Applied Statistics 

• MATH 15, 16 and knowledge of a high-level programming language; 

• Fifteen hours from STAT 31 2, 313, 331, 341, 351, 361, 362, 381, 385,451. 

A grade of C or better and a minimum 3.0 GPA is required for courses fulfilling a 
minor in statistics. A statistics faculty member must be on the student's graduate com- 
mittee. Statistics must be one of the areas covered in the student's comprehensive 
examination. 

Minor in Mathematical Statistics 

• MATH 15, 16,17, and knowledge of a high-level programming language; 

• STAT 361, 362; 

• Nine hours from STAT 312, 313, 331, 341, 351, 381, 385, 451. 

A grade of C or better and a minimum 3.0 GPA is required for courses fulfilling a 
minor in statistics. A statistics faculty member must be on the student's graduate com- 
mittee. Statistics must be one of the areas covered in the student's comprehensive 
examination. 



Statistics 185 



Statistics (STAT) 

201. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 16. Probability, random 
variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, joint probability distributions, expected 
value. The central limit theorem. Point and interval estimation and tests of hypotheses. Chi-square 
tests, linear regression, and correlation. 

205. Introductory Probability and Statistical Inference. I. 3 HR. PR: MATH 128 orequiv. Probabil- 
ity, random variables, expectation, random sampling, descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, 
estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression, nonparametric statistics. 

212. Intermediate Statistical Methods. I, II. 3 HR. PR: STAT 101 or STAT 201 or equiv. Extension 
of basic concepts of statistical inference: estimation and hypothesis testing for more than two 
populations, multiple regression and correlation, curvilinear regression, analysis of variance and 
covariance. 

213. Introductory Design and Analysis. II. 3 HR. PR: STAT 212. Introduction to the linear model, 
the complete and fractional factorial experiment, and the completely random, randomized com- 
plete block, Latin square, and split-plot experimental designs. 

221 . Statistical Analysis System (SAS). I. 3 HR. PR: STAT 101 or STAT 201 or equiv. and CS 15 
or equiv. Introduction to the use of the Statistical Analysis System (SAS), a statistical computer 
program. Students will perform statistical data analysis, data file modifications, and statistical 
report writing. 

231. Sampling Methods. I. 3 HR. PR: STAT 101 or 201 or equiv. Methods of sampling from finite 
populations, choice of sampling unit and sample survey design. Estimation of confidence limits 
and optimum sample size. Single and multistage sampling procedures. 

251. Data Analysis. I. 3 HR. PR: STAT 212 or equiv. Computer analyses of simulated or real 
unbalanced data using a matrix approach to linear models. The techniques will include: least 
squares analysis of variance and covariance; multiple and polynomial regression; multiple dis- 
crimination. 

261. Theory of Probability. I. 3 HR. PR: MATH 17. Theoretical coverage of probability, random 
variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions. Expected value, moment generating 
functions, special probability distributions. Random sampling and distributions of certain func- 
tions of random variables. The Central Limit Theorem. 

262. Theory of Statistics. II. 3 HR. PR: STAT 261. Theoretical introduction to statistical inference. 
Properties of estimators and techniques of estimation. Hypotheses testing including the Neyman- 
Pearson Lemma and likelihood ratio tests. Regression and correlation. Selected topics. 

291 . Topics in Statistics. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: STAT 201 or equiv. Advanced study of topics in statistics. 

305. Foundations of Probability and Statistics. S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 16 or consent. Probability, 
random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, point and interval estimation, 
chi-square tests, linear regression, and correlation. 

311 . Statistical Methods 1. 1, II. S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 3. Statistical models, distributions, probability, 
random variables, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, regression, correlation, transforma- 
tions, F and Chi-square distributions, analysis of variance and multiple comparisons. (Equiv. to 
ED. P. 311 andPSYC311.) 

312. Statistical Methods 2. 1, II, S. 3 HR. PR: STAT 311 orequiv. Completely random, randomized 
complete block, Latin square and split-plot experimental designs. Unplanned and planned mul- 
tiple and orthogonal comparisons for qualitative and quantitative treatments and factorial arrange- 
ments. Multiple linear regression and covariance analysis. (Equivalent to EDP 312 and PSYC 
312.) 

313. Design of Experiments. II. 3 HR. PR: STAT 312 or equiv. Expected mean squares, power of 
tests and relative efficiency for various experimental designs. Fixed, random, and mixed models. 
Use of sub-sampling, covariance and confounding to increase power and efficiency. 



1 86 WVU Graduate Catalog 



331. Sampling Theory and Methods. I. 3 HR. PR: STAT 311 or equiv. Survey components, meth- 
ods of sampling for finite and infinite populations, single and multi-stage procedures, confidence 
limits for estimating population parameters; sample size determination, area sampling, sources of 
survey error, a "hands-on" project in survey sampling is included. 

341. Applied Multivariate Analysis. II. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: STAT 311 or equiv. Introduction 
to Euclidean geometry and matrix algebra; multiple and multivariate regression including multiple 
and canonical correlation; the k-sample problem including discriminant and canonical analysis; 
and structuring data by factor analysis, cluster analysis, and multidimensional scaling. 

351 . Applied Regression Analysis. I. 3 HR. PR: STAT 312 or equiv. Matrix approach to linear and 
multiple regression, selecting the "best" regression equation, model building, and the linear mod- 
els approach to analysis of variance and analysis of covariance. 

361. Theory of Statistics 1. I. 3 HR. PR: MATH 17. Probability and random variables, univariate 
and multivariate distributions, expectations, generating functions, marginal and conditional distri- 
butions, independence, correlation, functions of random variables including order statistics, limit- 
ing distributions, and stochastic convergence. 

362. Theory of Statistics 2. II. 3 HR. PR: STAT 361 . Techniques of point and interval estimation, 
properties of estimates including bias, consistency, efficiency, and sufficiency; hypothesis testing 
including likehood ratio tests and Neyman-Pearson Lemma; Bayesian procedures, analysis of 
variance and nonparametrics. 

371. Introduction to Exploratory Data Analysis. I. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: An introductory 
statistics course. Basic ways in which observations given in counted and measured form are 
approached. Pictorial and arithmetic techniques of display and discovery. Methods employed are 
robust, graphical, and informal. Applications to social and natural sciences. 

381. Nonparametric Statistics. II. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: STAT 311 or equivalent. Distribu- 
tion-free procedures of statistical inference. Location and scale tests for homogeneity with two or 
more samples (related or independent); tests against general alternatives. 

385. Categorical Data Analysis. II. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: STAT 201 or equiv. Bivariate 
association for ordinal and nominal variables, models for categorical or continuous responses as 
a special case of generalized linear models, methods for repeated measurement data, exact 
small-sample procedures. 

390. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of 
statistics. 

391. Advanced Studies in Statistics. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced 
statistics subjects which are not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Study may be indepen- 
dent or through specially scheduled lectures. 

392. Analysis of Experiments. I, II, S. 1 HR. PR: Consent. Statistical consulting and data analysis. 

396. Graduate Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one 
seminar to the assembled faculty and student body in statistics. 

397. Research in Statistics. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. 

441. Multivariate Statistical Theory. II. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: STAT 341, 361 or consent. 
Euclidean vector space theory and matrix algebra, multivariate normal sampling theory, the theory 
of the multivariate general linear hypothesis including multivariate regression, MANOVA, and 
MANCOVA, and the theory of factor analysis. 

451. Linear Models. II. (Alternate years.) 3 HR. PR: STAT 351, 362 or consent. Multivariate nor- 
mal distribution, distribution of quadratic forms, linear models, general linear hypotheses, experi- 
mental design models, components of variance for random effects models. 



Statistics 187 



Center for Women's Studies 

Helen M. Bannan, Director 
218 Eiesland Hall 

The Center for Women's Studies has a university-wide mission to coordinate in- 
terdisciplinary teaching and research on women and gender. The Center sponsors 
lectures, films, colloquia, symposia, conferences, faculty development programs, 
and scholarships. A resource library in the Center supplements the women's stud- 
ies holdings of other campus libraries. The Center is supported by the West Virginia 
Alliance for Women's Studies, a community-based group that promotes women's 
studies and women's education throughout the state. 

Although there is currently no independent graduate degree in women's studies avail- 
able at West Virginia University, students interested in doing graduate work in women's 
studies can apply for admission to the master of arts in liberal studies program (M.A.L.S.), 
offered through the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences. This interdisciplinary program 
provides an opportunity for students to develop their course work and project in the 
framework of women's studies scholarship. Interested students should become famil- 
iar with the requirements of M.A.L.S. as described on page 1 63 and contact the M.A.L.S. 
director before contacting the Center. 

Undergraduate Certificate in Women's Studies 

Students can also choose to complete an undergraduate certificate in women's stud- 
ies in conjunction with the M.A.L.S. degree or any other graduate degree. The certifi- 
cate, a 1 9-hour program with two required and four elective courses, allows the student 
to design an individualized certificate or choose to focus on an area of concentration 
such as Women's Literature or Women's Health and Sexuality. The certificate consti- 
tutes a valuable credential in a variety of careers necessitating an understanding of 
women's issues. To enroll in the certificate program, students must register with the 
Program Specialist in the Center for Women's Studies. 

Financial Assistance 

Some financial assistance is available to students doing graduate work in women's 
studies. Two scholarships are available to students doing graduate course work or 
research in women's studies, the Winifred South Knutti Graduate Scholarship in Women's 
Studies and the Velma M. Miller Women's Studies Graduate Scholar Award. Teaching 
assistantships may also be available. 

For more information, visit the Center's web site at http://www.as.wvu.edu/wmst/ or 
contact the Center for Women's Studies, 218 Eiesland Hall, PO BOX 6450, Morgantown, 
WV 26506-6450. Email wvwmst@wvu.edu Telephone (304) 293-2339. 

In addition to the women's studies courses listed below, other courses focusing on 
women and gender as well as independent study opportunities are available in several 
university departments. 



1 88 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Women's Studies (WMST) 

240. Methods and Perspectives in Women's Studies. I, II. 4 HR. PR: 9 HR. in approved women's 
studies courses and junior standing, or consent. An exploration of major theoretical perspectives 
on and research methods appropriate to the interdisciplinary study of women and gender. 

290. Independent Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Individual study of an interdisciplinary 
issue in women's studies and/or gender studies. 

350. Sexuality in American Culture. II. 3 HR. Explores changes in sexuality in the United States 
from the seventeenth century to the present, examining social and cultural struggles and debates 
over the meaning of sexuality and sexual orientation in American society. Analyzes research 
methodologies appropriate to this field. (Credit cannot be received for both 150 and 350.) 

391. Advanced Topics. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced Women's Studies 
Topics. Study may be independent or through scheduled meetings. 

397. Research. I, II, S. 1-9 HR. PR: Consent. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of 
Women's Studies. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced Women's Studies 
topics. Study may be independent or through scheduled meetings. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



Women's Studies 189 



College of Business and Economics 

Sydney V. Stern, Ph.D., Dean 

Tom S. Witt, Ph.D., Associate Dean 

Richard M. Gardner, M.B.A., Assistant Dean 

Susan Gustin, M.A., Assistant Dean 

Paul J. Speaker, Ph.D., Coordinator of Graduate Programs 

The College of Business and Economics was founded in November of 1 951 and gradu- 
ated its first class in the spring of 1953. Since that time, the College of Business and 
Economics has become one of the largest colleges at West Virginia University. In 1954, 
the College became fully accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of 
Business, the highest level of business accreditation. 

In 1 990, the new College of Business and Economics building was completed on the site 
of Old Mountaineer Stadium on the Downtown Campus adjacent to historic Woodburn Hall. 
The four-story facility houses modern classrooms, two auditoriums, state-of-the-art com- 
puter laboratories, and space for the College's research and service centers. 

Our mission centers around educating students to prepare them for professional ca- 
reers in business, industry, government, and education. The College administration and 
faculty work with the WVU Career Services Center and private employers to place our 
graduates in rewarding professional positions. 

The master of arts and doctor of philosophy degrees in economics prepare students 
for careers in business, government, and higher education. Students receive in-depth 
education in the concepts and methods of economic analysis and also study business 
analysis, public policy, mathematical economics, labor economics, resource economics, 
public finance economics, regional and urban economics, monetary economics, interna- 
tional economics, and econometrics. These programs are well-suited to students with 
undergraduate degrees in economics, finance, mathematics, statistics, public policy, his- 
tory, and other humanities majors. 

The master of business administration program is especially attractive for the student 
with a non-business undergraduate major since no business courses are prerequisite for 
admission. Course work includes an even exposure to all of the functional areas of man- 
agement and provides a broad, general management orientation. The M.B.A. program is 
also available part time on evenings or weekends at various locations throughout 
West Virginia. 

The master of science program in industrial relations provides a flexible, interdiscipli- 
nary education for the student desiring a career in human resources management (in- 
dustrial relations). All undergraduate majors are acceptable. Areas of study may include 
the functional areas of business, counseling, law, safety, and others. 

The master of professional accountancy program is available to students with under- 
graduate degrees in accounting. The program follows the AlCPA's recommendations for 
a five-year accounting education and meets the requirements of all states with 150-hour 
requirements for CPA certification. The master's programs can be completed by a full- 
time student in one to one and a half years. Specific information about graduate 
programs in the College of Business and Economics may be obtained from Office of 
Graduate Programs, 333 Business and Economics Building, P.O. Box 6025, West 
Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6025. Telephone (304) 293-5408. 

Graduate Programs 

Business Administration M.B.A. 

Economics M.A., Ph.D. 

Industrial Relations M.S. 

Professional Accountancy M.P.A. 

Overview of Programs 

The M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics prepare students for careers in business, 
government, and higher education. Students receive in-depth education in the concepts 



1 90 WVU Graduate Catalog 



and methods of economic analysis and also study business analysis, public policy, mathe- 
matical economics, labor economics, resource economics, public finance economics, 
regional and urban economics, monetary economics, international economics, and econo- 
metrics. These programs are well-suited to students with undergraduate degrees in eco- 
nomics, finance, mathematics, statistics, public policy, history, and other humanities majors. 

The M.B.A. program is especially attractive for the student with a non-business under- 
graduate major since no business courses are prerequisite for admission. Course work 
includes an even exposure to all of the functional areas of management and provides a 
broad, general management orientation. The M.B.A. program is also available part time 
on evenings or weekends at various locations throughout West Virginia. 

The master of science program in industrial relations (M.S.I.R.) provides a flexible, inter- 
disciplinary education for the student desiring a career in human resources management 
(industrial relations). All undergraduate majors are acceptable. Areas of study may include 
the functional areas of business, counseling, law, safety, sociology, and others. 

The master of professional accountancy (M.P.A.) program is available to students with 
undergraduate degrees in accounting. The program follows the AlCPA's recommenda- 
tions for a five-year accounting education and meets the requirements of all states with 
1 50-hour requirements for C.P.A. certification. The master's programs can be completed 
by a full-time student in one year. 

Special Requirements 

The M.B.A., M.P.A., and M.S. in industrial relations and the M.A. and Ph.D. in econom- 
ics programs require a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. Overall grade 
point average is considered, with additional attention given to the grade point average 
achieved in the last sixty hours of course work. The Graduate Management Admissions 
Test (GMAT) is required for all of the business graduate programs. For the MSIR pro- 
gram, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) may be substituted for the GMAT. The 
economics programs require the GRE. A resume is a requirement of the admission pro- 
cess for all programs. 

Graduate Faculty 

* Indicates regular membership in the graduate faculty. 
Indicates associate membership in the graduate faculty. 

Accounting 
Professors 

*Jay H. Coats, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Cost/managerial accounting, Microcomputers in accounting, 

Accounting education. 
tScott I. Jerris, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Financial accounting, Accounting theory, Capital markets. 
•Robert S. Maust, M.S. (WVU). CPA. Financial accounting, Accounting theory, Managerial and cost 

accounting. 
*Adolph A. Neidermeyer, Ph.D. (U. Iowa). Federal and state income taxation, Estate planning, 

Financial accounting. 
T David B. Pariser, Ph.D. (So. III.). CPA, CMA, CCA, CGFM. Financial accounting, Governmental 

accounting and auditing, Public sector accounting, International accounting. 
T Ann B. Pushkin, Ph.D. (VPI&SU). CPA. Auditing, EDP auditing, Accounting information systems, 

Microcomputer applications. 
*Gail A. Shaw, Ph.D. (U. Mo.). CPA, Financial accounting theory, Auditing, Business combinations. 
T G. Stevenson Smith, Ph.D. (U. Ark.). CPA, CMA, CCA. Not-for-profit and governmental 

accounting, Cost accounting, Managerial accounting. 
Associate Professor 
r Richard C. Brooks, Ph.D. (LSU). CGFM. Managerial accounting, Governmental accounting, Public 

sector accounting. 
*Bonnie W. Morris, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). CPA. Accounting information systems, Expert systems and 

artificial intelligence, Internal auditing. 
Assistant Professors 
*Timothy A. Pearson, Ph.D. (U. Wise). CPA. Auditing, Financial accounting, Microcomputer 

applications. 

College of Business and Economics 191 



Economics 
Professors 

Donald R. Adams, Jr., Ph.D. (U. Penn). American economic history, European economic history, 

Economic development. 
f Luc E. Anselin, Ph.D. (Cornell U.). Regional economics, Econometrics. 
f Ronald J. Balvers, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Financial economics, Macroeconomic theory. 
T Clifford B. Hawley, Ph.D. (Duke U.). Labor economics, Microeconomic theory, Econometrics. 
T Ming-jeng Hwang, Ph.D. (Tex. A&M U.). General theory, Urban and regional economics, 

Mathematical economics. 
f Andrew W. Isserman, Ph.D. (U. Penn.). Regional economics. 

f Kern O. Kymn, Ph.D. (U. Chicago). General theory, Mathematical economics, Econometrics. 
Patrick C. Mann, Ph.D. (Ind. U.). Utility economics, Industrial organization. 
Douglas Mitchell, Ph.D. (Princeton U.). Monetary theory, Macroeconomic theory. 
"•"William S. Reece, Ph.D. (Wash. U— St. Louis). Public economics. 

Horn S. Witt, Ph.D. (Wash. U. — St. Louis). Econometrics, Energy economics, Regional economics. 
Adjunct Professors 
t Walter C. Labys, Ph.D. (Nottingham U.). Adjunct. Commodity market modeling, Mineral 

economics, Econometrics. 
H'im T. Phipps, Ph.D. (U. Cal. Davis). Agricultural economics, Resource economics. 
Associate Professors 

tBrian J. Cushing, Ph.D. (U. Md.). Urban and regional economics, Econometrics, Public finance. 
f Stratford M. Douglas, Ph.D. (UNC). Econometrics, Industrial organization, Corporate finance. 
t William Trumbull, Ph.D. (UNC). Public finance, Law and economics, Applied microeconomics. 
Adjunct Associate Professor 

f Victor K. Chow, Ph.D. (U. Ala.). Corporate finance, Portfolio management, Microeconomics. 
Assistant Professors 

*Subhayu Bandyopadhyay, Ph.D. (U. Md.). International trade, International finance. 
*Sudeshna Bandyopadhyay, Ph.D. (U. Md.). Labor economics. 
*Eun-Soo Park, Ph.D. (Northwestern U.). Microeconomic theory, Game theory. 
tRussell S. Sobel, Ph.D. (Fla. St. U.). Public finance. 

Finance 
Professors 

William B. Riley, Ph.D. (U. Ark.). Investments, Capital markets. 

Frederick C. Scherr, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Corporate finance, Capital markets. 

Associate Professors 

r Ashok Abbott, Ph.D. (VPI&SU). Financial institutions, Corporate finance, Mergers and acquisitions. 

f Victor Chow, Ph.D. (U. Ala.). Corporate finance, Portfolio management. 

f Karen C. Denning, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Corporate finance, Speculative markets, Economic regulation. 

f Terry L. Rose, Ph.D. (U. of III.). Insurance, Risk management. 

^aul J. Speaker, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Financial institutions, Modeling, Uncertainty. 

Assistant Professors 

Heather Mulburt, Ph.D. (Penn State U.). Corporate Finance, Insurance. 

Management and Industrial Relations 
Professors 

*Neil S. Bucklew, Ph.D. (U. Wise). Past President. Industrial relations, Collective bargaining, 
Labor-management relations. 

f Randyl D. Elkin, Ph.D. (Iowa St. U.). Collective bargaining, Arbitration, Health care bargaining. 

f Jack A. Fuller, Ph.D. (U. Ark.). Heuristic decision making, Production planning and control, 
Systems analysis and design. 

f Ali H. Mansour, Ph.D. (U. Ga.). Management information systems, Management science, 
Production operations management. 

t Dietrich Schaupp, D.B.A. (U. Ky.). Organizational performance and development, Labor- 
management cooperation. 

Associate Professors 

f Gerald L. Blakely, Ph.D. (UNC). Human resource management, Organizational behavior. 

T James Denton, Ph.D. (Kent St. U.). Decision science, Operations management. 

*John Harpell, D.B.A. (Ga. St. U.). Operations research, Mentorship, Production management. 

f Robert H. Moorman, Ph.D. (Ind. U.). Human resource management, Organizational behavior. 

*Wilbur J. Smith, M.S. (U. Wise). Human resource economics, Employment and training programs, 
Labor force. 

*Owen A. Tapper, M.S. (U. Wise). Trade unionism, Safety and health, Labor-management 
cooperation. 

1 92 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Assistant Professor 

*Kunal Banerji, (U. Ky.). International business, Policy and strategy. 
Annette Ranft, Ph.D. Policy and strategy. 
*Monika Renard, Ph.D. (U. Md.). Human resource management. 
William Spangler, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Management information systems. 

Marketing 
Professors 

*Cyril M. Logar, D.B.A. (Kent St. U.). Health care marketing, Strategic marketing and planning, 

Marketing research. 
Associate Professors 

tPaula F. Bone, Ph.D. (U. So. Car.). Consumer behavior, Marketing research, Public policy. 
*Robert W. Cook, D.B.A. (Kent St. U.). Sales management, Product management, Marketing 

strategy and planning, Retail management. 
Robert Corey, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Channels of distribution, New product development, Direct 

marketing, Retail management, Business ethics. 
f Karen R. France, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Health care and service marketing, Consumer research, 

Advertising strategy. 
f Thomas Ponzurick, D.B.A. (Memphis St. U.). Health care and services marketing, International 

marketing, Strategic marketing research. 



Accountancy, Professional 

Gail Allan Shaw, Coordinator 
333 Business and Economics Building 
Degree Offered: 
Master of Professional Accountancy 

Given the changing environment in both the public and private sectors of the economy, 
many accountants will need an educational background that goes beyond that obtained 
in an undergraduate degree program. Accountants must be proficient in applying profes- 
sional concepts and principles to a wide variety of existing situations and also have the 
ability to adapt to new standards and methods of doing business. Competing in such an 
environment requires a solid technical foundation, an adeptness in analyzing multifari- 
ous business situations, and the aptitude to effectively communicate recommended so- 
lutions and conclusions. Thus, the objectives of the master of professional accountancy 
degree are as follows: 

• Enhancement of the knowledge base acquired in an undergraduate accounting pro- 
gram with respect to professional concepts, standards, and principles and the ability 
to apply them. 

• Development of higher level critical thinking, problem solving, and other creative 
skills beyond those attributable to undergraduate education. 

• Enhancement of an understanding of ethical, legal, and regulatory issues with re- 
spect to business decisions. 

• Continued development of an awareness of the impact of the global environment on 
business decisions. 

• Enhancement of skills applicable to analyzing diverse and complex business 
situations. 

• Comprehension and evaluation of the economic, political, and societal effects of 
accounting techniques and authoritative pronouncements. 

• Creation of an attitude conducive to lifelong learning. 

• Continued development of listening, writing, and oral communication skills. 

The accounting programs at WVU have separate accounting accreditation by the 
AACSB-The International Association for Management Education. WVU has the only 
separately accredited accounting programs in West Virginia. At the date of this printing, 
there are 76 universities in the nation that have achieved this status at both the under- 
graduate and graduate levels. 



Accounting 1 93 



Requirements to Sit for CPA Examination 

The specific requirements to sit for the CPA examination vary with each State Board 
of Accountancy. The requirements in all states are subject to change for each exami- 
nation. Students should carefully review their undergraduate and MPA course work to 
ensure all CPA examination requirements will be met for their state. The web sites of 
the various Boards of Accountancy appear below. 

February 2000 is the last application date for students to sit for the West Virginia CPA 
examination without meeting the 150-hour requirement of the WV Board of Accountancy. 
Students must have completed their bachelor's degree by the date of application. 

For more information on specific requirements to become a CPA in various states, 
visit these web sites: 

• www.state.wv.us/wvboa 

West Virginia Board of Accountancy requirements to sit for examination and be 
come a CPA in West Virginia. 

• www.nasba.org 

National Association of State Boards of Accountancy for addresses of all state 
Boards of Accountancy requirements to sit for examination and become a CPA by 
state. 

• www.aicpa.org 

Content specification of CPA examination and related information. 

Financial Assistance 
Financial Aid 

WVU has a strong comprehensive financial aid program to help you finance your educa- 
tion. Although the cost to attend WVU is relatively low, more than half of our students qualify 
for financial aid awarded on the basis of need, merit, or a combination of the two. The free 
application for Federal Student Aid (FASA) must be filled out before March 1 . Contact the 
Student Financial Aid Office at (304) 293-5242 for more information. 

Part-time Employment 

The Department of Accounting employs several full-time MPA students on an hourly 
basis as accounting course assistants. The Department also has an active program to 
assist students in obtaining part-time accounting positions within the university and 
with local businesses. If you are interested in part-time employment, please complete 
the enclosed Graduate Student Worker Form. As at most universities, tuition waivers 
and assistantships are not available at the master's degree level. 

Program 

The MPA program is a 30-hour program which can be completed in approximately 10 
months of full-time study or 22 months half-time in Charleston and Morgantown. The 
program requires that the student have an undergraduate degree with a minimum of 24 
hours in accounting. Work experience is not a requirement for admission. Students may 
enter the program on either a full-time or half-time basis. Fall is the preferred starting 
date. Careful selection of degree candidates limits the size of classes, leads to high 
quality efforts in the program, and permits frequent and direct contact between students 
and faculty. The full-time program consists of two 12-hour semesters and one 6-week 
summer term. The courses are taught on Monday through Thursday during the regular 
semester to encourage outside employment experience. 

No thesis is required in the program, but communication skills are emphasized in all 
courses. Extensive use is made of microcomputers in accounting applications. 

Admission to Program 

Admission to the MPA program is determined by a committee of accounting faculty 
members. The committee acts upon individual applications within a short period of 
time after receipt of the completed application. Students currently in an undergraduate 
program should apply at the beginning of their final semester; admission is based upon 
grades earned during the first seven semesters of undergraduate study. 

1 94 WVU Graduate Catalog 



The admission committee seeks applicants who possess a 3.0 cumulative grade point 
average (calculated on all college courses completed or the last 60 hours); an accounting 
grade point average of 3.0 (calculated exclusive of principles, proctoring, internship, and 
independent study courses); and GMAT scores in the top 50 percent of each part of the 
exam. Candidates who meet most of the above requirements will still be considered. 

The above requirements apply to both full and half-time student applicants. As an 
AACSB-accredited program in accounting, these requirements must also be met by 
non-degree students who desire to take any of the graduate courses required by the 
MPA program. Students are not permitted to take MPA courses under a trial or provi- 
sional admittance. The GPA and GMAT requirements must be met before enrolling in 
any MPA courses. 

Students who possess appropriate GMAT scores and grade point averages but do not 
possess a bachelor's degree with a major in accounting (or equivalent) may apply for non- 
degree or provisional status while they are taking undergraduate prerequisite courses in 
accounting and business. The MPA degree is designed to follow an undergraduate 
degree in business. Students without a bachelor's degree with a major in accounting (or 
equivalent) may be required to take additional business and accounting courses. 

Prerequisites 

To assure that all students in the program have the same foundation in business, the 
following prerequisite courses, or their equivalent, must be completed before enrolling in 
M.P.A. graduate courses: principles of accounting (six hours), intermediate accounting 
(six hours), advanced accounting, cost accounting, income tax accounting, auditing, prin- 
ciples of economics (six hours), principles of marketing, principles of management, prin- 
ciples of finance, statistics, business law, and computer science. A student without the 
necessary prerequisite courses may be approved to enter the M.P.A. program as a pro- 
visional graduate student. 

Master of Professional Accountancy 

Courses will be offered in Morgantown in the College of Business and Economics 
Building and at the WVU Building in the Charleston Area Medical Center in Charleston. 
Classes begin August 25. 

MPA Course Offerings 1998-99 

Fall Hrs. 

*ACCT 330 Financial Accounting Theory and Practice 3 

*ACCT 333 Income Taxes and Business Decisions 3 

ACCT 349 Oral/Written Skills for Professionals 3 

ACCT 491 International Dimensions of Accounting 3 

12 

** Spring Hrs. 

ACCT 332 Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting 3 

ACCT 335 Computer Systems Auditing 3 

ACCT 338 Controllership 3 

ECON 391 Economics for Decision-Makers 3 

12 

** Summer Hrs. 

ACCT 340 Reporting Practices and Problems 3 

ACCT 345 Auditing and Professional Accounting Standards 3 

6 
Total 30 



Accounting 1 95 



Note: Students who have not completed Accounting Information Systems (Accounting 
211, 3 hours) and Business Law and the CPA (Business Law 213, 3 hours) as part of 
their undergraduate program must also take these two courses in addition to the above 
30 hours. 

*Classes offered in Charleston and Morgantown on Monday and Wednesday. Account- 
ing 330 meets from 2:30 to 3:45 p.m. and Accounting 333 meets from 4:00 to 5:15 p.m. 

**Charleston spring and summer offerings will be determined later this year. 

MPA Course Offerings 1999-2000 

Hours 

ACCT 330 Financial Accounting Theory and Practice 3 

ACCT 333 Income Taxes and Business Decisions 3 

ACCT 39 1 A Accounting Information Systems Analysis 3 

ACCT 391 B Accounting and Information Technology 3 

ACCT 391 C Financial Reporting and Emerging Issues 3 

ACCT 391 D International Accounting and Business Practices 3 

ACCT 391 E Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting 3 

ACCT 391 F Information Technology Auditing 3 

ACCT 391 G Assurance Services and Standards 3 

ACCT 391 H Accounting and Business Consulting 3 

Total 30 

Note: Students who have not completed Accounting Systems (Accounting 211, 3 
hours) and Business Law and the CPA (Business Law 213, 3 hours) as part of their 
undergraduate program must also take these two courses in addition to the above 30 
hours. 

Academic Standards 

The M.P.A. program requires that the student maintain a grade-point average of at 
least 3.0 on all work taken as a graduate student while enrolled in the College of 
Business and Economics, including prescribed work taken to remove undergraduate 
deficiencies. A student whose cumulative grade-point average falls below 2.75 will be 
placed on probation. If the average is not brought up to 2.75 by the end of the following 
semester, the student will be suspended from the program. A grade below C in more than 
one course taken while enrolled as a graduate student will result in suspension from the 
graduate program. Complete information about the M.P.A. program may be obtained by 
contacting the director of graduate programs. 

Accounting (ACCT) 

200. Special Topics. 1-4 HR. PR: ACCT 111 or consent. Special topics relevant to accounting. 
(Maximum of 9 semester hours in any or all courses numbered 200 offered by the College of 
Business and Economics may be applied toward bachelor's and master's degrees.) 

210. Advanced Accounting. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 112. Accounting for business combinations, consoli- 
dations, foreign currency translation, governmental and not-for-profit entities, and equity method 
investment accounting. 

211. Accounting Systems. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 110 and MANG 101. Analysis of data processing 
fundamentals and information systems analysis, design, and implementation, including neces- 
sary computer hardware and software components with particular reference to accounting infor- 
mation systems and the controls necessary therein. 

213. Income Tax Accounting. 3HR. PR: ACCT 111 or ACCT 116. Overview and survey of Federal 
income tax principles for individuals and simple corporations with emphasis on gross income, 
exemptions, and deductions, capital gains and losses, and tax credits. 

214. Income Tax Accounting. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 213. The study of federal income tax treatment of 
partnerships, corporations and estates, and the treatment of those property transfers subject to 
the Federal Gift Tax, together with an introduction to tax research and tax procedure. 



1 96 WVU Graduate Catalog 



217. Auditing Theory. 3 HR. Coreq: ACCT 211. Auditing fundamentals, objectives, ethics, 
statistical sampling, standards and procedures. Emphasis on FASB and SAS disclosures. 

330. Financial Accounting Theory and Practice. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 112. Comprehensive examina- 
tion of financial accounting theory as established by the opinions, statements, and interpretation 
of professional organizations with special emphasis on their application and problem solving. 

332. Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 112. Fund accounting and control 
in governmental and nonprofit entities; identification and control of cost centers; cost analysis and 
cost finding, and planning and control of operations and resources. 

333. Income Taxes and Business Decisions. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 213. Advanced federal income-tax 
problems with emphasis on tax planning for business decisions and tax research methodology. 

335. Computer Systems Auditing. 2 HR. PR: ACCT 325. The analysis and design of control sys- 
tems in a computerized accounting environment. Special emphasis on evaluating evidence to 
determine whether a computing system safeguards assets and maintains data integrity. 

338. Controllership. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Examination of the role of the controller in large entities 
in planning, measuring, evaluating, and controlling performance and in reporting to stockholders 
and governmental agencies. 

340. Reporting Practices and Problems. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Evaluation of financial reporting prac- 
tices and trends, including an examination of the reporting requirements of the SEC and other regula- 
tory agencies. Practitioners will be used extensively for class discussion and presentations. 

345. Auditing and Professional Accounting Standards. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 217. Professional objec- 
tives, principles, and standards of auditing; audit reports and related communications; and case 
studies of audit sampling, professional ethics, legal liability, and reporting. 

349. Seminar in Accounting. 3 HR. PR: Consent. 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

491 . Advanced Study. 1 -6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 



Business Administration 

Paul J. Speaker, Director of Graduate Programs 
333 Business and Economics Building 
Degree Offered: 
Master of Business Administration 

The master of business administration program is accredited by the American Assembly 
of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). It is offered as a full-time, day-class program in 
Morgantown and as a part-time program in Beckley, Bluefield, Charleston, Lewisburg, 
Morgantown, Parkersburg, Shepherdstown, and Wheeling. The standards of excellence 
that support accreditation by the AACSB are maintained at all instructional sites. 

The M.B.A. degree program recognizes the need for a manager of the future to be 
able to anticipate and recognize change and then to manage resources advantageously 
in that environment. Thus, the curriculum emphasizes a general, broad-based approach 
to graduate education in management which provides the student with the qualitative 
and quantitative skills necessary for a manager to succeed in such an environment. The 
program develops a managerial perspective that is primarily line as opposed to staff 
oriented and is relevant to those in both private and public organizations. 



Business Administration 1 97 



Credit Hours 

The plan of study requires a total of 48 semester hours of graduate credit. The pro- 
gram is designed for individuals with varying educational and professional backgrounds. 
No prior course work in business administration is required as a condition of admission 
to the program. No master's thesis is required for completion of the degree. 

The full-time M.B.A. degree program is completed in 13 1/2 months of full-time study 
on the Morgantown campus. A full-time student can enter the program only on July 1 of 
each year and graduates in mid-August of the following year. Students may enter the 
part-time M.B.A. program in designated semesters. A minimum of two and a half years is 
required for the part-time student to complete the program. 

Admission 

Full-time To gain admission to the full-time M.B.A. program, an applicant must have a 
bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. The full-time M.B.A. program is de- 
signed for students with non-business undergraduate majors. Admissions decisions are 
based on an assessment of expected success in the program shown by the application 
materials and on space available. The admissions committee considers grade point av- 
erage in all previous college-level work and also the grade point average in the last 60 
hours of course work. The Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) is required. 
Each applicant must submit a resume with the application. The admissions committee 
takes no action on an application for admission to the full-time program until the appli- 
cant submits a GMAT score. 

Part-time To gain admission to the part-time M.B.A. program, an applicant must have a 
bachelor's degree in any discipline from an accredited institution. The Graduate 
Management Admissions Test (GMAT) is required. Each applicant must submit a re- 
sume showing prior work experience. Admissions decisions are based on assessments 
of expected success in the program as shown by the application materials and on space 
available. For applicants with less than five years of work experience, the GMAT and the 
undergraduate record provide the strongest indicators of success. For applicants with 
five or more years of experience, the admissions committee will place greater emphasis 
on the work history. For applicants with masters or doctoral degrees, the admissions 
committee may waive the GMAT requirement. 

Transcripts and Deadlines 

Applications for admission to the M.B.A. program and official transcripts of all prior 
academic work should be submitted to the WVU Office of Admissions and Records as 
early as possible. Applicants who have attended institutions other than WVU must re- 
quest the registrar or records office of those institutions to forward a complete official 
transcript directly to the WVU Office of Admissions and Records. For the full-time pro- 
gram, the deadline for receipt of applications and transcripts in the College's Office of 
Graduate Programs is March 1. For the part-time program, the deadline is one month 
prior to the starting date requested. Admission to the program is competitive and subject 
to space being available. 

Financial Aid 

University scholarships are available on a competitive basis to minority students. Addi- 
tional information and application forms can be obtained from the director of graduate 
programs. 

M.B.A. Program 

The M.B.A. degree program requires 48 hours of graduate credit, including the follow- 
ing courses: 
Accounting 311 Financial Accounting for Decision Making 
Accounting 321 Managerial Control 
Business Law 311 Legal and Regulatory Environment 
Economics 317 Economic Decision Making 
Economics 318 Economic Policy 
Economics 31 9 Applied Business and Economics Statistics 

1 98 WVU Graduate Catalog 






Finance 311 Managerial Finance 

Finance 321 Corporate Financial Administration 

Management 301 Organizational Behavior and Ethics 

Management 303 Introduction to Management Science 

Management 311 Management Information Systems 

Management 321 Operations Management/Applied Quantitative Analysis 

Management 325 Seminar in Organizational Processes 

Management 351 Policy and Strategy 

Marketing 311 Marketing Management 

Marketing 321 Marketing Strategy 

Seminar 

Seminar 

Academic Standards 

The M.B.A. requires that the candidate achieve a cumulative grade-point average of at 
least 3.0 on all work counting toward the graduate degree. A regular graduate student 
whose cumulative grade-point average falls below 2.75 will be placed on probation. If the 
average is not brought up to 2.75 by the end of the following semester, the student will be 
suspended from the program. A grade below C in more than one course taken while 
enrolled as a graduate student will result in suspension from the program. In addition, the 
student must maintain a 3.0 average in all work counting toward the graduate degree. 

Part-time Program 

Students in the part-time program are subject to the same requirements and restric- 
tions as students enrolled in the full-time program. Classes in the part-time program are 
taught by graduate faculty members in the College. The M.B.A. part-time program is 
offered in its entirety in Beckley, Bluefield, Charleston. Lewisburg, Morgantown, Parkers- 
burg, Shepherdstown, and Wheeling. Weekend classes normally meet on Friday eve- 
nings (7:00 to 1 0:00) and Saturdays (9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.). A three semester-hour course 
normally meets for five weekends and a two semester-hour course for three weekends. 
Weekend classes may have examinations scheduled on weekday evenings. Weekday 
classes normally meet one or two evenings per week and on occasional Saturdays. 

Accounting (ACCT) 

200. Special Topics. 1-4 HR. PR: ACCT 111 or consent. Special topics relevant to accounting. 
(Maximum of 9 semester hours in any or all courses numbered 200 offered by the College of 
Business and Economics may be applied toward bachelor's and master's degrees.) 

210. Advanced Accounting. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 112. Accounting for business combinations, consoli- 
dations, foreign currency translation, governmental and not-for-profit entities, and equity method 
investment accounting. 

211. Accounting Systems. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 110 and MANG 101. Analysis of data processing 
fundamentals and information systems analysis, design, and implementation, including neces- 
sary computer hardware and software components with particular reference to accounting infor- 
mation systems and the controls necessary therein. 

213. Income Tax Accounting. 3HR. PR: ACCT 111 or ACCT 116. Overview and survey of Federal 
income tax principles for individuals and simple corporations with emphasis on gross income, 
exemptions, and deductions, capital gains and losses, and tax credits. 

214. Income Tax Accounting. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 213. The study of federal income tax treatment of 
partnerships, corporations and estates, and the treatment of those property transfers subject to 
the Federal Gift Tax, together with an introduction to tax research and tax procedure. 

217. Auditing Theory. 3 HR. Coreq: ACCT 211. Auditing fundamentals, objectives, ethics, 
statistical sampling, standards and procedures. Emphasis on FASB and SAS disclosures. 

330. Financial Accounting Theory and Practice. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 112. Comprehensive examina- 
tion of financial accounting theory as established by the opinions, statements and interpretation 
of professional organizations with special emphasis on their application and problem solving. 

Business Administration 1 99 



332. Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 112. Fund accounting and control 
in governmental and nonprofit entities; identification and control of cost centers; cost analysis and 
cost finding, and planning and control of operations and resources. 

333. Income Taxes and Business Decisions. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 213. Advanced federal income-tax 
problems with emphasis on tax planning for business decisions and tax research methodology. 

335. Computer Systems Auditing. 2 HR. PR: ACCT 325. The analysis and design of control sys- 
tems in a computerized accounting environment. Special emphasis on evaluating evidence to 
determine whether a computing system safeguards assets and maintains data integrity. 

338. Controllership. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Examination of the role of the controller in large entities 
in planning, measuring, evaluating, and controlling performance and in reporting to stockholders 
and governmental agencies. 

340. Reporting Practices and Problems. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Evaluation of financial reporting prac- 
tices and trends, including an examination of the reporting requirements of the SEC and other regula- 
tory agencies. Practitioners will be used extensively for class discussion and presentations. 

345. Auditing and Professional Accounting Standards. 3 HR. PR: ACCT 217. Professional objec- 
tives, principles, and standards of auditing; audit reports and related communications; and case 
studies of audit sampling, professional ethics, legal liability and reporting. 

349. Seminar in Accounting. 3 HR. PR: Consent. 

391 . Advanced Topics. 1 -6 HR. 

491 . Advanced Study. 1 -6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

Economics (ECON) 

200. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Special topics relevant to eco- 
nomics. (Maximum of nine semester hours in any or all courses numbered 200 offered by the College 
of Business and Economics may be applied toward the bachelor's and master's degrees.) 

211 . Intermediate Micro Theory. I, II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54. Consumer choice and demand; price and 
output determination of the firm, and resource allocation, under different market structures; welfare 
economics, externalities, public goods, and market failure; general equilibrium; other topics. 

212. Intermediate Macro Theory. I, II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Forces which determine 
the level of income, employment, output, the inflation rate, and the balance of trade. Particular 
attention to consumer behavior, investment determination, and government fiscal and monetary 
policy. 

213. Economic Development. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. The problems, changes, 
and principal policy issues faced by non-industrialized countries. 

216. History of Economic Thought. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and Econ 55. Economic ideas in 
perspective of historic development. 

220. Introduction to Mathematical Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55 and 
(MATH 128 or MATH 15 or MATH 16.) Principal mathematical techniques including set operation, 
matrix algebra, differential and integral calculus employed in economic analysis. Particular atten- 
tion given to static (or equilibrium) analysis, comparative-static analysis and optimization prob- 
lems in economics. 

225. Applied Business and Economic Statistics. I, II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 1 25 or STAT 1 01 . Continu- 
ation of ECON 125. Principal statistical methods used in applied business and economic re- 
search including multiple regression, index numbers, time series analysis, forecasting models 
and methods, and sampling design. 

226. Introductory Econometrics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54, 55, (ECON 125 or STAT 101). Analy- 
sis of economic models using basic econometric methods. Specification, computation, and inter- 
pretation of linear regression. 



200 WVU Graduate Catalog 



241. Public Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Economic roles of the public 
sector. Particular attention to market failure, redistributing income, the financing of public sector 
activities, relationships between federal, state, and local governments, and public choice. 

245. Government and Business. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Examination of market 
structure, conduct, and performance. Analysis of market regulation including antitrust laws and 
regulation of monopolies. 

246. Transportation Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Economic and institutional analy- 
sis of the domestic transportation system of the United States. Topics include role of transportation, 
carrier characteristics and services, transportation rates and costs, regulation of transportation. 

250. International Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Development of trade 
among nations; theories of trade; policies, physical factors, trends, barriers to trade. Determina- 
tion of exchange rates. Open economy macroeconomics. 

255. Regional Economics. I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Analysis of the regional economy's 
spatial dimension, emphasizing interregional capital and labor mobility, the role of cities, objec- 
tives and issues of regional policy, lagging regions and Appalachia, growth poles, and regional 
growth and income distribution. 

257. Urban Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Analyzes growth, decline, and 
socioeconomic problems of cities. Topics include the development of cities, urban spatial struc- 
ture and land-use patterns, poverty and discrimination, housing, urban transportation and con- 
gestion, local government structure, and urban fiscal problems. 

260. Labor Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Labor market analysis. Topics 
include wage and employment determination, human capital theory, discrimination, unemploy- 
ment, migration, effects of unions and government regulation, and life-cycle patterns of work. 

270. American Economic History. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Central issues in the 
development of the American economy. 

297. Internship. I, II, S. 1-12 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55 and departmental approval. Field 
experience in the analysis and solution of economic problems in the public and private sectors. 

299. Readings in Economics. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55 and departmental 
approval. Students will develop and carry out a program of specialized readings under the super- 
vision of a cooperating instructor. 

310. Advanced Micro Theory 1. 4 HR. PR: Department approval. Theory of production and alloca- 
tion, utility theory, theory of the firm, pricing in perfect and imperfect markets, models of firm's 
operations. 

311. Advanced Micro Theory 2. 4 HR. PR: ECON 310. General equilibrium analysis, distribution 
theory, welfare economics. 

312. Advanced Macro Theory 1. 3 HR. PR: Department approval. Classical, Keynesian and mod- 
ern macroeconomic theories. 

313. Advanced Macro Theory 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 312. Models of economic growth and fluctua- 
tions, and other advanced topics in macroeconomic theory. 

31 6. History of Economic Doctrines and Analysis. 3 HR. PR: ECON 31 and graduate standing or 
consent. Writings of the major figures in the development of economic doctrines and analysis. 

317. Economic Decision Making. 2 HR. PR: ECON 54 or consent. (Primarily for M.B. A. students.) 
Analysis of the firm as an optimizing unit operating in the market place. Examination of product 
demand, production and costs, pricing theory and practices, risk, and capital budgeting. 

318. Economic Policy. 2 HR. PR: ECON 317 or consent. (Primarily for M.B.A. and M.P.A. stu- 
dents.) Microeconomic analysis of macroeconomic phenomena is considered with particular at- 
tention paid to the reaction by firms to price and interest rate effects of fiscal and monetary policy. 

319. Applied Business and Economics Statistics. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Primary statistical methods 
used in business and economics research including hypothesis testing, estimation, linear regres- 
sion, time series, and business forecasting. Statistical computer software is an integral part of the 
course. 



Business Administration 201 



320. Mathematical Economics. 3 HR. PR: Departmental approval. Mathematics used in economics. 

325. Econometrics 1. 3 HR. PR: ECON 320. Mathematical statistics, including probability, math- 
ematical expectation, distributions. Linear regression, ordinary least squares and simple exten- 
sions. Students will use a computer to analyze data. 

326. Econometrics 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 325. Econometric methods used by practicing economist. 
Includes simultaneous equations, asymptotic properties of estimators, and generalizations of and 
alternatives to least squares estimation. Also may include qualitative response, panel data, non- 
linear, spatial, and time series models. 

328. Advanced Mathematical Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and ECON 320. Mathematical 
properties of microeconomic models of general equilibrium and welfare, existence, uniqueness, 
and stability of equilibrium. Applications of Hamiltonian and maximum principles to growth models 
and economic control problems. Investigation of separability theorems. 

329. Econometrics 3. 3 HR. PR: ECON 326. Completes the graduate econometrics sequence. 
Topics may include computational methods and time series, spatial, nonlinear, qualitative response, 
and panel data models. 

330. Monetary Economics 7.3HR. PR: ECON 312. Sources and determinants of supply of money; 
demand for money for transactions and speculative purposes; general equilibrium of money, in- 
terest, prices, and output; role of money in policy. 

334. Monetary Economics 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 330. Further topics in monetary economics. 

340. Public Economics 1. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310. Economic role of government in a mixed economy 
with regard to topics such as resource allocation and distribution of income; social choice mecha- 
nisms; fiscal federalism; and revenue. 

343. Economic Analysis of Public Policies. 3 HR. Application of economic analysis to questions of 
public policy. Consideration of problems of public goods and other market failures and usefulness 
of cost-benefit analysis to policy making. (Equivalent to POLS 331 .) 

344. Public Economics 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 340. Continuation of public economics. 

345. Industrial Organization. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and graduate standing or consent. Economic 
analysis of market structure, conduct, and performance; in-depth evaluation of markets and in- 
dustries in the United States and the effect of government intervention on firm behavior. 

349. Public Regulation of Business. I or II. 3 HR. Economic analysis of regulation of specific 
industries such as public utilities. 

350. International Trade. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310. Contemporary theories of international trade; 
analysis of current problems in world trade. 

354. International Macroeconomics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 312 Current theories and policies concern- 
ing balance of payments, international capital movements, and foreign exchange, and their rela- 
tion to the macro economy. 

355. Advanced Regional Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and graduate standing or consent. 
Regional income and flow of funds estimation, regional cyclical behavior and multiplier analysis, 
industrial location and analysis, techniques of regional input-output measurement, impact of local 
government reorganization on regional public service and economic development. 

357. Advanced Urban Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310. Theory, policy, and empirical research 
regarding growth and decline of cities, urban spatial structure and land-use patterns, intra-metro- 
politan employment location, urban transportation, housing, housing market discrimination, local 
government structure, fiscal problems, and urban redevelopment. 

358. Spatial Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 or consent. Spatial dimension incorporated into 
the study of economic activity; spatial competition, market area analysis, locational equilibrium 
analysis, general spatial equilibrium. 

359. Seminar in Regional Economics. 3 HR. 

360. Advanced Labor Economics 1. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310. Topics in advanced labor market 
analysis including structure of wages, investment in human capital, discrimination, effects of unions 
and government regulation and life-cycle issues. 

202 WVU Graduate Catalog 



364. Advanced Labor Economics 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 360. Continuation of Advanced Human 
Resource Economics. 

370. Economic History. 3 HR. Examination of the methods of research and issues in economic 
history of the United States. 

374. Seminar in Economic History. 3 HR. 

380. Energy Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310. Welfare analysis of supply interruptions and the 
foreign dependence question. Study of various energy resources in reference to policy alterna- 
tives under variant growth conditions and input-output models. Examination of coal industry and 
coal externalities. 

384. Environmental Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 380. Examination of the theoretical and empiri- 
cal literature dealing with externalities (pollution), the relationships between pollution and social 
costs, the relationships between energy production and environmental quality, and the optimal 
strategies for pollution abatement. 

390. Independent Reading in Economics. 3-6 HR. PR: Departmental approval. Supervised read- 
ings. For graduate students in special areas. 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

409. Research Design and Methodology. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Departmental approval is required. 
Basic research approaches based on examples from the student's own work, papers presented 
at the departmental research seminar series, and economics literature in general. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491. Advanced Study. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 

Finance (FIN) 

200. Special Topics. 1-4 HR. Coreq: Fin 112 or 321. Special topics relevant to finance. 

212. Working Capital Management. 3 HR. PR: FIN 112. Management of current assets and liabilities. 
Topics include the management of cash, marketable securities, accounts receivable, inventories, trade 
accounts payable, and short-term bank borrowings. Decision models are used extensively. 

216. Risk Management. 3 HR. PR: FIN 115, Coreq: FIN 112. Transferable risks with which the 
entrepreneur must deal. Emphasis on the process by which decisions are made for handling 
these risks, including an examination of contributions and limitations of insurance system. 

217. Employee Benefit Plans. 3 HR. PR: FIN 115. Use, design and regulation of group life insur- 
ance, health care and pensions, including their federal tax consequences. Study of the available 
contracts in each area and financing alternatives and practices. 

218. Life Insurance and Estate Planning. 3 HR. PR: FIN 115. Principles of life and health insur- 
ance protection; application of life insurance to individual, family, business, and societal needs; 
study of trusts, wills and estates, integrating of income programming into estate management. 



Business Administration 203 



219. Property and Liability Insurance. 3 HR. PR: FIN 115. Study of the use and production of 
property and liability insurance, including evaluation of insurance contracts and current insurance 
practices; legal and regulatory environment affecting use and production of insurance. 

220. Social Insurance. 3 HR. PR: FIN 115. Our social and political efforts to provide economic 
security for the general public. An examination of the parallel developments of private insurance. 

250. Security Analysis and Portfolio Management. 3 HR. PR: FIN 150. The systematic selection, 
assessment, and ranking of corporate securities in a portfolio framework through a synthesis of 
fundamental analysis, technical analysis, and random walk. 

251. Bank Management. 3 HR. Coreq: FIN 112. (May not be taken for both undergraduate and 
graduate credit.) Management of bank funds. Principles of organization lending and investment. 
Policy relationships to bank productivity, organization, and profitability; preparation of financial 
reports; management of a simulated bank in a changing environment. 

252. Advanced Bank Management. 3 HR. PR: FIN 251 . An Advanced course in commercial bank- 
ing involving problems of management of the money position, loan and investment portfolio and 
capital adequacy. The student simulates actual bank operation, conducts case studies, and ana- 
lyzes bank performance. 

261. Real Estate Appraising. 3 HR. PR: FIN 161. 

262. Real Estate Finance. 3 HR. 

263. Real Estate Investment and Land Development. 3 HR. 

290. Advanced Finance. 3 HR. PR: FIN 1 1 2, Cone: MANG 225. Integrative course in finance to be 
taken during the final semester before graduation. 

297. Internship in Finance. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. PR: FIN 111 and department approval. Supervised practical 
experience in student's major field; identification, analysis, and evaluation of a specific project. 
(Student, under departmental supervision, arranges internship with sponsoring organization.) 

299. Independent Study. 1-3 HR. PR: FIN 112 and department approval. Students will develop 
and complete a program of specialized studies under the supervision of a cooperating instructor. 

311. Managerial Finance. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Analysis of the standard financial activities of the 
firm including: financial planning, structure of financing, and asset selection. Introduction to mi- 
crocomputer problem solution. 

321. Corporate Financial Administration. 3 HR. PR: FIN 111 or FIN 311, or consent. A study of 
theoretical concepts of corporate financial administration and the application of these concepts to 
real world case studies. 

331. Bank Management. 3 HR. PR or Coreq.: FIN 311 or consent. (May not be taken for both 
undergraduate and graduate credit.) Management of bank funds. Principles of organization lend- 
ing and investment. Policy relationships to bank productivity, organization, and profitability; prepa- 
ration of financial reports; management of a simulated bank in a changing environment. (Same as 
FIN 251 with the addition of a research paper.) 

335. Money and Capital Markets. 3 HR. 

337. Capital Budgeting. 3 HR. 

349. Seminar in Finance. 3 HR. PR: FIN 321 . 

391 . Advanced Topics. 1 -6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491 . Advanced Study. 1 -6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

204 WVU Graduate Catalog 



495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 

Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) 

260. Survey of the Employment Relationship. I. 3 HR. PR: 58 credits completed. Overview of 
employee and labor relations; management techniques, teams, labor-management relations, em- 
ployment law, benefits, compensation, education and training programs, and current issues. 

262. Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations. 3 HR. PR: ECON 260 or department approval. 
Examination of the theory and practice of collective bargaining. Topics include economic and 
historical environment, labor law, unionization, contract negotiation, patterns in contract content, 
conflict resolution, grievance handling, and an introduction to arbitration. 

301. Industrial Relations Analytical Techniques 1. 3 HR. PR: Admission to the ILR graduate pro- 
gram and CS 5 or equivalent. Introduction to the software and hardware appropriate for use in 
human resource applications, emphasizing efficient and effective use of previously developed 
software. Introduction to quantitative analytical decision-making techniques. 

302. Industrial Relations Analytical Techniques 2. 3 HR. PR: Admission to the ILR graduate pro- 
gram. Further development of the quantitative analytical techniques and of business information 
systems used in the human resources field. Emphasis on quantitative decision-making and infor- 
mation systems in an industrial relations setting. 

303. Critical Thinking and HR Research Methods. I. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Philosophy and 
methods of critical thinking and human resources research methods and practices. 

304. /. R. Theory and Strategy I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Corequisite: ILR 262. Description and 
analysis of employee workplace governance systems in competitive and non-competitive mar- 
kets. Search for rational employer-employee relationships in the US and internationally. 

305. Employment Law. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Corequisite: ILR 262. Survey of the legal principles 
guiding the employer-employee relationship. Examines laws regulating hiring, job opportunity, 
discrimination, affirmative action, sexual harassment, wages, benefits, privacy right, health, safety, 
employment at will, layoffs, and termination. 

306. Performance Management and Training. II. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Development of 
individual employees in an organization; performance evaluation, discipline of problem employ- 
ees, identifying training needs, and design and delivery of training programs. 

307. Conflict Management Processes. S. I. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. PR: Consent. Sources of 
conflict in the workplace and processes utilized to deal with that conflict. Theories of conflict 
management, industry practices, and specific techniques for productive channeling of conflict. 
Significant experiential component. 

308. Organizational Change and Renewal. S, II. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Organizational evo- 
lution as a result of multiple change process, including employee involvement, empowerment, 
high performance organizations, process consulting, and goal setting. Emphasis on organiza- 
tional and union relationships. 

309. Staffing and Selection. II. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Theoretical, practical, and legal is- 
sues involved in staffing and selection in organizations; human resource planning, recruiting, 
employment testing, statistical analysis, legal issues, and selection methods. 

310. Human Resources Economics. 3 HR. PR: Admission to the ILR graduate program. Consid- 
eration of the conditions of employment and unemployment at both macro and micro levels under 
varying degrees of completion, including the process of labor force preparation, labor market data 
and policy. 

320. HR Information Systems. II. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Use of computers for human re- 
source management; HRIS planning, development and implementation; evaluating existing soft- 
ware; development of a database unique to human resource management. 

Business Administration 205 



321. Manage Culture Diverse Workfc. I, S. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Perceptions involving 
cultural diversity issues. Composition of the workforce and its impact on the corporate culture. 
Management theories, sociological paradigms and conflict resolution in addressing multi-cultural 
issues in the workplace. 

322. International Industrial Relations. I. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Analyzes the human re- 
source and labor relations practices of firms and economies as they relate to the global market; 
basics of international business, legal/governmental environmental, labor movements, and in- 
dustrial relations practices. 

330. Compensation Issues. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Seminar in compensation designed to develop 
further understanding of compensation theory and practice. Topic areas will include labor supply, 
wage theory, legal constraints, motivation, equity theory, organizational development as well as 
compensation structure and administration. 

332. American Trade Unionism. 3 HR. PR: ILR 262 or 316 or consent. Examines the rise of American 
unionism and traces historical factors shaping its philosophy. Topics include economic conditions and 
union history, comparisons of AFL and CIO structures and the AFL-CIO as a government. 

333. Seminar: Quality of Work Life. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Analysis of current trends and approaches 
in "quality of work life improvement" with special attention to developments in participative man- 
agement, job enrichment and gain sharing. Results of current research are featured. 

334. Work Group Dynamics and Leadership. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Small group or individual re- 
search on topics related to leadership and group dynamics in the work environment including 
training and other human relations programs. 

337. Practicum in Industrial Interviewing. 3 HR. PR: ILR 312 and consent. Experiential learning of 
industrial interviewing techniques covering legal and technical aspects of employment interview- 
ing and other types of interviewing. 

340. Arbitration Theory and Practice. 3 HR. PR: ILR 262 and consent. Study of the purpose of 
arbitration, trends, principles of contract construction, hearing procedure evidence, remedies, 
training and education of arbitrators, training of advocates, and decision writing. Students will 
arbitrate mock cases. 

343. Negotiation Strategy. S, II. PR: Consent. Corequisite: ILR 262. Theory and practice of both 
principled negotiations and position bargaining; extensive role play and technique building exer- 
cises for individual and team negotiations; detailed preparation methods for all types of personal 
and professional negotiations. 

344. Benefits. 3 HR. Considers employee benefits from the perspective of the industrial relations 
specialist who is responsible for articulating and administering a corporate program. Includes 
study of all benefits covered by major federal legislation. 

345. Equal Employment Opportunity Problems. 3 HR. PR: Consent. A series of lectures by specialists 
in equal employment opportunity affairs. Lectures will include attorneys, directors of state and national 
EEO agencies, and representatives of business and industry and the labor movement. 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491. Advanced Study. 1-6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

206 WVU Graduate Catalog 



499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 

Management (MANG) 

200. Special Topics. 1-4 HR. PR: MANG 105. Special topics relevant to management. (A maxi- 
mum of nine semester hours in any special topics 200 course offered by the College of Business 
and Economics may be applied toward bachelor's and master's degrees.) 

201. Business Information Systems. 3 HR. PR: MANG 101 and MANG 105. Use of EDP for 
decision making with emphasis on application in the functions of finance, marketing, personnel, 
accounting, and operations management. 

205. The Individual and the Organization. 3 HR. PR: MANG 105. Examination of how the indi- 
vidual, the group, and the organization interact to influence the behavior of the business organi- 
zation and that of its human resources. 

206. Organizational Theory and Analysis. 3 HR. PR: MANG 105. Influences of structure on the 
behavior and dynamics of the business organization, including emphasis on becoming an effec- 
tive manager. 

211. Advanced Production Management. 3 HR. PR: MANG 111. Integration of quantitative tech- 
niques and their application to production problems. Utilizes cases and projects. 

212. Management Science. I. 3 HR. PR: MANG 105. Study and application of quantitative meth- 
ods to business problems in which deterministic conditions prevail. 

216. Personnel Management. 3 HR. PR: MANG 105. Fundamental principles and practices re- 
lated to the procurement, development, maintenance, and utilization of human resources. Focus 
on areas such as human resource planning, selection training, performance appraising, compen- 
sation, safety and health, and labor relations. 

217. Personnel and Compensation. 3 HR. PR: MANG 216. Designing and implementing total 
compensation systems in both private and public sectors. The emerging elements of total com- 
pensation systems are included providing insights into problems and opportunities for personnel. 

218. Focal Points in Management. 1-3 HR. PR: MANG 105. In-depth study of specialized man- 
agement subjects, e.g., personnel interviewing, job descriptions, consulting, or organizational 
development. (Each subject is self-contained, spans one-third of a semester, and is valued at 1 
credit hour.) 

220. Human Resource Management Research Methods. II. 3 HR. PR: MANG 205. Research 
methods and measurement in human resource management; philosophy of science, ethics in 
research, research design, and analytical methods. 

222. Management Science. II. 3 HR. PR: MANG 212. Study and application of quantitative meth- 
ods to business problems in which probabilistic conditions prevail. 

225. Business Policy. 3 HR. PR: 110 credit hours completed and MANG 101 and MANG 105 and 
MANG 111 and MKTG 111 and BLAW 111 and FIN 111. Integration of key components of the 
business curriculum. The case method is utilized to study a wide variety of policy issues including 
international and ethical concerns. 

230. Entrepreneurship. 3 HR. PR: MANG 105. The role of the entrepreneur in business and soci- 
ety; includes an analysis of the individual entrepreneur, and investigates the nature and problems 
of establishing a new business enterprise. 

260. Practicum in Small Business. 3 HR. PR: MANG 105. A practical training ground in the iden- 
tification and solution of small business problems. Through interaction with the business commu- 
nity, students are exposed to the opportunities and difficulties of small business entrepreneurship. 

297. Internship in Management. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. PR: Department approval. Supervised practical 
experience in student's major field; identification, analysis, and evaluation of a specific project. 
(Student, under departmental supervision, arranges internship with sponsoring organization.) 

299. Independent Study. 1-3 HR. PR: Department approval. Student will develop and complete a 
program of specialized studies under the supervision of a cooperating instructor. 

300. Management Information Technology/Systems. 3 HR. 



Business Administration 207 



301. Organizational Behavior and Ethics. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Interpersonal relationships through 
which administration becomes effective. Emphasis on human factors, but influences of economic 
and technological factors also are considered. Focus on ethics and importance of harmony be- 
tween individual needs and organization goals. 

303. Introduction to Management Science. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Study of management science 
models and techniques with applications in business decision-making problems. Coverage in- 
cludes mathematical programming models, decision theory, simulation, network models, and other 
current management science topics. 

304. Quantitative Business Methods. 3 HR. 

311. Management Information Systems. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Examines computer technology, 
applications, information systems, and performance. Computer system planning, selection and 
implementation. Computer impact upon management, organization, and society from a manage- 
rial viewpoint. 

321 . Operations Management/Applied Quantitative Analysis. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Review of con- 
cepts, techniques and models encountered in manufacturing and service operations. Modeling 
approach and computer applications in operations management and management science are 
emphasized. 

325. Seminar in Organizational Processes. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Examination of the dynamics of 
the successful organization. Emphasis on the organization as an institution and the role of the 
manager in the organization. Implications of international competition will be addressed. 

330. Organizational Development. 3 HR. 

335. Human Resource Management. 3 HR. 

336. Managerial Skills Seminar. 3 HR. 

340. Methodology Management Science. 3 HR. 

349. Seminar in Management. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. In-depth study of important management 
issues. 

351. Policy and Strategy. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Capstone course. Integrates functional knowledge 
with strategy formulation and strategy implementation concepts. Cases of organizations varying 
in size, national affiliation, and profit orientation are analyzed with special emphasis on ethics and 
social responsibility. 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491 . Advanced Study. 1 -6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 

Marketing (MKTG) 

200. Special Topics. 1-4 HR. PR: MKTG 111. Special topics relevant to marketing. 



208 WVU Graduate Catalog 



201. Focal Points in Marketing. 1-3 HR. PR: MKTG 111. In-depth study of specialized marketing 
subjects, e.g., franchising, tourism, packaging, or product development. (Each subject is self- 
contained, spans one-third of a semester, and is valued at 1 credit hour.) 

203. Sales Management. 3 HR. PR: MKTG 111. Concentrates on the managerial responsibilities 
of sales managers for directing, motivating, and controlling a sales force plus the techniques of 
selling including objections and closing. 

205. Consumer Behavior. 3 HR. PR: MKTG 113. The consumer decision process in a marketing 
framework. Emphasis on psychological and sociological concepts which influence the decision 
process. 

207. Business Logistics Management. 3 HR. PR: MKTG 115. Examination of transportation, ware- 
housing, materials handling, containerization, inventory control, purchasing, and warehouse lo- 
cation. Significant use made of problem solving with analytical tools. 

208. Global Marketing. I.3HR. PR: MKTG 111. Evaluation and analysis of marketing strategies in 
a global environment; examination of the relationships between international buyer behavior and 
the elements of the marketing mix. 

210. Business to Business Marketing. 3 HR. PR: MKTG 111 . A study of marketing to three classes 
of customers; the commercial market, the institutional market, and government agencies. 

211. Marketing Management. 3 HR. PR: MKTG 111,12 hours of MKTG. Simulation, through live 
and written case study, should sharpen skills as the student makes analytical evaluations of mar- 
keting problems. 

297. Internship in Marketing. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. PR: MKTG 111 and department approval. Super- 
vised practical experience in student's major field; identification, analysis, and evaluation of a 
specific project. (Student under departmental supervision, arranges internship with sponsoring 
organization). 

299. Independent Study. 1-3 HR. PR: MKTG 111 and department approval. Students will develop 
and complete a program of specialized studies under the supervision of a cooperating instructor. 

311. Marketing Management. 2 HR. Introduction to marketing management with specific empha- 
sis on consumer behavior and market segmentation, product planning, promotion, distribution, 
and pricing. 

321 . Marketing Strategy. 3 HR. Emphasis on formulating a marketing strategy and developing analyti- 
cal and decision-making capabilities. Cases will be used to illustrate specific business situations. 

330. Management Product Development. 3 HR. 

335. Management Distribution Systems. 3 HR. 

349. Seminar in Marketing. 3 HR. 

391 . Advanced Topics. 1 -6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491. Advanced Study. 1-6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 

Business Administration 209 



Economics 

William Trumbull, Chairperson, Department of Economics 
420 Business and Economics Building 
Degrees Offered: 
Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy 

The master of arts and doctor of philosophy degrees in economics enable students to 
broaden and refine their knowledge of the concepts and methods of economic analysis. 
These programs are designed to prepare students for careers in business, government, 
and higher education. Student programs are planned with the assistance of a faculty 
advisor and approval of the Director of Graduate Programs. Additional information about 
the graduate programs in economics, and the regulations and requirements pertaining to 
them, may be obtained by securing a copy of Graduate Programs in Economics from the 
graduate director. Students are bound by these regulations and requirements, as well as 
those of the College of Business and Economics. 

Prerequisites 

To be admitted as a regular student, applicants must have a grade-point average of 3.0 
or better for all undergraduate work completed and a minimum combined score of 1 500 for 
the three parts of the general aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination. All 
students must submit their scores on the general aptitude portion of the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) and international students must also submit their scores on the TOEFL. 
In addition, it is required that all applicants will have completed at least one semester of 
each of the following courses: intermediate microeconomic theory, intermediate macro- 
economic theory, calculus, and statistics. Applicants not meeting these entrance 
requirements may be admitted on a provisional and/or deficiency basis, subject to certain 
performance conditions during their first semester in residence. 

Assistantships 

A limited number of graduate assistantships and tuition scholarships are available on 
a competitive basis to full-time students. Major selection criteria include prior academic 
performance and GRE scores. Graduate assistants receive a cash stipend that is com- 
parable in amount to that offered at other universities. Graduate assistants engage in 
research and/or teaching activities. The faculty of the Department of Economics also 
nominates outstanding applicants for University fellowships. Special scholarships are 
also available on a competitive basis to minority students. Further information and appli- 
cations can be obtained from the Director of Graduate Programs. 

Academic Standards 

To qualify for a graduate degree in economics, students must earn a cumulative grade- 
point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better for all courses completed as a graduate student at 
WVU. A regular graduate student in economics whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 
(B) upon completion of the first nine hours of graduate study is not in good standing and 
will be placed on probation. A student in the program whose cumulative GPA falls below 
3.0 will be placed on probation as of the close of the semester in which the GPA fell 
below 3.0. Such a student, placed on probation, who fails to raise his/her cumulative 
GPA to 3.0 by the end of the semester succeeding that in which his/her GPA fell below 
3.0 is subject to suspension from the program at the end of that probationary semester. 

Other academic reasons for suspension from the program include failing grades on 
more than 50 percent of the course work taken in any semester, a third failure on either 
a microeconomic theory or macroeconomic theory comprehensive examination, a fourth 
failure on comprehensive field examinations, or failure to complete all degree require- 
ments within the specified time limits. 



21 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Master of Arts Program 

The master of arts program requires a total of 37 hours of graduate credit, including 22 
hours of economics. At least 25 hours of course work completed must be at the 300 
level. To qualify for the M.A. degree, graduate students in economics must earn a grade 
of B- or better in Economics 31 and 312, and a grade-point average of 3.0 in all courses 
attempted as a graduate student at WVU. The M.A. program has a thesis and a non- 
thesis option. 
Specific course requirements include: 

Economics 320 Mathematical Economics 3 HR. 

Economics 310 Advanced Microeconomic Theory 1 4 HR. 

Economics 312 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory 1 3 HR. 

Statistics Requirement 

Statistics 231 Sampling Methods 3 HR. 

Economics 226 Applied Econometrics 3 HR. 

or for students who consider going into the Ph.D. program, these two courses may be 
replaced by: 

Economics 325 Econometrics 1 3 HR. 

The student must also select either thesis or non-thesis alternative: 

• Thesis Alternative: An acceptable thesis for six hours is required and the student 
must pass a final oral examination. 

• Nonthesis Alternative: In lieu of a thesis, the requirements for the M.A. are met by 
completion of two 300-level courses in one field of concentration in economics and 
submission of a research paper that gives evidence of substantial ability to conduct 
scholarly research. 

Special M.A. Emphases 

The M.A. program in economics includes optional special emphases adminis- 
tered by the College of Business and Economics jointly with other units on campus. 
These emphases are business analysis, mathematical economics, public policy, and 
statistics and economics. To earn the M.A. in economics with a special emphasis, 
students must complete the M.A. requirements (above) and fulfill other requirements 
pertaining to the particular emphasis. The emphases are best viewed as coherent 
sample programs developed in conjunction with other units and are designed to 
prepare students for employment in a particular area or specialty of economics. 

Business Analysis Conducted in cooperation with other departments of the College of 
Business and Economics, the business analysis emphasis is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for employment in the business analysis area. As part of their M.A. program in 
economics, students complete 13 hours of business courses: Financial Accounting, 
Managerial Finance, Corporate Financial Administration, Organizational Behavior and 
Ethics, and Marketing Management. 

Mathematical Economics The mathematical economics emphasis is conducted in co- 
operation with the Department of Mathematics. Students entering this emphasis must 
previously have taken 12 hours in mathematics, including a course in calculus equiva- 
lent to MATH 15. Additional requirements are Advanced Micro Theory 2, Advanced Macro 
Theory 2, Econometrics, Mathematical Economics, Advanced Mathematical Economics, 
Applied Linear Algebra, and Introduction to Real Analysis. 

Public Policy The public policy emphasis is conducted in cooperation with the 
Department of Political Science and provides students with broad training in policy 
analysis skills and methods. Prior completion of at least six hours of political science 
course work is required. Additional requirements are Introduction to Policy Research, 
Public Policy Analysis, and Economic Analysis of Public Policies. 
Statistics and Economics Conducted in cooperation with the Department of Statistics 
and Computer Science, the statistics and economics emphasis is designed to prepare 
students for employment in the public or private sector that demands the use of quantitative 
skills. Additional requirements are statistics, probability, applied regression analysis, and 
econometrics. 

Economics 21 1 



Doctor of Philosophy 

At least four years of full-time graduate work beyond the baccalaureate degree are 
usually required to complete the doctorate. A minimum of two consecutive semesters in 
actual residence as a full-time graduate student is required. To qualify for the doctor of 
philosophy degree in economics, a student must earn a cumulative grade-point average of 
3.0 in courses completed as a graduate student at WVU. 

The Ph.D. degree is not awarded for the mere accumulation of course credits nor for 
the completion of the specified residence requirements. All students are required to 
complete the graduate core curriculum, prepare themselves in two fields of concentra- 
tion, and pass at least two additional 300-level economics courses with grades of B or 
better. Each student must also submit an acceptable dissertation. A minimum of 45 
hours of graduate work in economics at the 300 level is required for all candidates for 
the Ph.D. degree in economics. 

Economics 310 Advanced Microeconomic Theory 1 4 HR. 

Economics 311 Advanced Microeconomic Theory 2 4 HR. 

Economics 312 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory 1 3 HR. 

Economics 31 3 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory 2 3 HR. 

Economics 320 Mathematical Economics 3 HR. 

Economics 325 Econometrics 1 3 HR. 

Economics 326 Econometrics 2 3 HR. 

Economics 329 Seminar in Econometrics 3 HR. 

Economics 409 Research Design and Methodology 1 HR. 

Six semester hours (or the equivalent) must be taken in each of the student's two fields 
of concentration. Areas of concentration include monetary economics, public finance, re- 
gional and urban economics, labor economics, international economics, and resource eco- 
nomics. Other fields may also be approved. One of the fields of concentration may be in an 
outside area; selection must be approved by the graduate economics faculty. 

Comprehensive Examinations Students must pass written comprehensive examinations 
in microeconomic theory, in macroeconomic theory, and in two fields. For detailed rules, see 
departmental Graduate Programs in Economics filed in the Office of Graduate Director. 

Candidacy and Dissertation When an applicant has successfully completed all course 
work and passed the written comprehensive examinations, the applicant will be formally 
promoted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. The candidate must submit a dissertation 
pursued under the supervision of a member of the graduate faculty in economics on some 
problem in the area of the candidate's major interest. The dissertation must present the 
results of the candidate's individual investigation and must embody a definite contribution 
to knowledge. It must be approved by a committee of the graduate faculty in economics. 
After approval of the candidate's dissertation and satisfactory completion of other graduate 
requirements, a final oral examination on the dissertation is required. 

Each Ph.D. candidate is required to present a dissertation proposal to the graduate di- 
rector after approval by at least three members of his or her dissertation committee includ- 
ing the chairperson. This proposal will include a statement of the problem (topic summary), 
a preliminary survey of the literature, a description of the research methodology, and other 
pertinent material. With the approval of the graduate director, the student is then required to 
present the proposal in a faculty-student seminar. Credit for dissertation research and writ- 
ing is available under Economics 497, but only if the student has a dissertation chairperson 
and an approved topic. 

Ph.D. Emphases 

The Ph.D. program includes optional special emphases conducted in cooperation with 
other units on campus. These are industrial relations and mathematical economics. The 
emphases specify certain concentrations of course work and comprehensive examina- 
tions. Acceptable dissertations are required of all students. 

2 1 2 WVU Graduate Catalog 






Industrial Relations Graduate work in industrial relations typically is interdisciplinary in 
nature. The Ph.D. emphasis retains the interdisciplinary orientation while providing stu- 
dents with a Ph.D. -level of understanding of economic theory and economic analysis. Stu- 
dents in the industrial relations emphasis take the core courses in the Ph.D. program and 
take comprehensive examinations in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory. 

Students are required to complete two fields of concentration. One field must be indus- 
trial relations, which consists of the following courses: 

Industrial and Labor Relations 334 Leadership &Work Group Dynamics 

Industrial and Labor Relations 342 Advanced Collective Bargaining 

Industrial and Labor Relations 491 A Practicum in Research Methods 

Industrial and Labor Relations 491 B Research Theory 

The remaining field must be from within the Department of Economics. Most commonly, 
this field is labor economics. Students must pass written comprehensive examinations in 
their two fields of concentration. 

Mathematical Economics The mathematical economics emphasis is conducted in coop- 
eration with the Department of Mathematics. To be admitted into this emphasis, students 
must have completed a minimum of 12 hours in mathematics, including a course in calcu- 
lus equivalent to Mathematics 15. In addition to the Economics Ph.D. core, students are 
required to take the following courses: 

Economics 328 Advanced Mathematical Economics 

Mathematics 241 Applied Linear Algebra 

Mathematics 251 . 252 Introduction to Real Analysis 
(MATH 251 and 252 may be replaced by MATH 317. 318.) 

Mathematics 357 Calculus of Variations 

Mathematics Elective — 3 HR. 

Students are required to successfully complete comprehensive examinations in 
microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, mathematical economics/econometrics, and 
one other field in economics. 

Economics (ECON) 
Specialized Courses 

200. Special Topics. I. II. S. 1-4 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Special topics relevant to econom- 
ics. (Maximum of nine semester hours in any or all courses numbered 200 offered by the College of 
Business and Economics may be applied toward the bachelors and master's degrees.) 

297. Internship. I. II, S. 1-12 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55 and departmental approval. Field 
experience in the analysis and solution of economic problems in the public and private sectors. 

317. Economic Decision Making. 2 HR. PR: ECON 54 or consent. (Primarily for M.B.A. students.) 
Analysis of the firm as an optimizing unit operating in the market place. Examination of product 
demand, production and costs, pricing theory and practices, risk, and capital budgeting. 

318. Economic Policy. 2 HR. PR: ECON 317 or consent. (Primarily for M.B.A. and M.P.A. stu- 
dents.) Microeconomic analysis of macroeconomic phenomena is considered with particular at- 
tention paid to the reaction by firms to price and interest rate effects of fiscal and monetary policy. 

319. Applied Business and Economics Statistics. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Primary statistical methods 
used in business and economics research including hypothesis testing, estimation, linear regression, 
time series, and business forecasting. Statistical computer software is an integral part of the course. 

343. Economic Analysis of Public Policies. 3 HR. Application of economic analysis to questions of 
public policy. Consideration of problems of public goods and other market failures and usefulness 
of cost-benefit analysis to policymaking. (Equivalent to POLS 331.) 

Economic Theory 

211 . Intermediate Micro Theory. I. II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54. Consumer choice and demand: price and 
output determination of the firm, and resource allocation, under different market structures: welfare 
economics, externalities, public goods, and market failure: general equilibrium: other topics. 

212. Intermediate Macro Theory. I.I I. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Forces which determine the 
level of income, employment, output, the inflation rate, and the balance of trade. Particular attention to 
consumer behavior, investment determination, and government fiscal and monetary policy. 

Economics 213 



216. History of Economic Thought. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and Econ 55. Economic ideas in 
perspective of historic development. 

310. Advanced Micro Theory 1.4 HR. PR: Department approval. Theory of production and alloca- 
tion, utility theory, theory of the firm, pricing in perfect and imperfect markets, models of firm's 
operations. 

311. Advanced Micro Theory 2. 4 HR. PR: ECON 310. General equilibrium analysis, distribution 
theory, welfare economics. 

312. Advanced Macro Theory 1. 3 HR. PR: Department approval. Classical, Keynesian and mod- 
ern macroeconomic theories. 

313. Advanced Macro Theory 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 312. Models of economic growth and fluctua- 
tions, and other advanced topics in macroeconomic theory. 

316. History of Economic Doctrines and Analysis. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and graduate standing or 
consent. Writings of the major figures in the development of economic doctrines and analysis. 

384. Environmental Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 380. Examination of the theoretical and empiri- 
cal literature dealing with externalities (pollution), the relationships between pollution and social 
costs, the relationships between energy production and environmental quality, and the optimal 
strategies for pollution abatement. 

390. Independent Reading in Economics. 3-6 HR. PR: Departmental approval. Supervised read- 
ings. For graduate students in special areas. 

Quantitative Economics 

220. Introduction to Mathematical Economics. 3 HR. PR: MATH 15 or 128, and ECON 54 and 55; 
or consent. Principal mathematical techniques including set operation, matrix algebra, differential 
and integral calculus employed in economic analysis. Particular attention given to static (or equi- 
librium) analysis, comparative-static analysis, and optimization problems in economics. 

225. Applied Business and Economic Statistics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 125 or STAT 101 or consent. 
Continuation of ECON 125. Principal statistical methods used in applied business and economic 
research including multiple regression, index numbers, time series analysis, forecasting models 
and methods, and sampling design. 

226. Introductory Econometrics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54, 55 (ECON 125 or STAT 101). Analy- 
sis of economic models using basic econometric methods. Specification, computation, and inter- 
pretation of linear regression. 

320. Mathematical Economics. 3 HR. PR: Departmental approval. Mathematics used in economics. 

325. Econometrics 1. 3 HR. PR: ECON 320. Mathematical statistics, including probability, math- 
ematical expectation, distributions. Linear regression, ordinary least squares and simple exten- 
sions. Students will use a computer to analyze data. 

326. Econometrics 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 325. Econometric methods used by practicing economist. 
Includes simultaneous equations, asymptotic properties of estimators, and generalizations of and 
alternatives to least squares estimation. Also may include qualitative response, panel data, non- 
linear, spatial, and time series models. 

328. Advanced Mathematical Economics. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Mathematical properties of 
microeconomic models of general equilibrium and welfare, existence, uniqueness, and stability of 
equilibrium. Applications of Hamiltonian and maximum principles to growth models and economic 
control problems. Investigation of separability theorems. 

329. Econometrics 3. 3 HR. PR: ECON 326. Completes the graduate econometrics sequence. 
Topics may include computational methods and time series, spatial, nonlinear, qualitative response, 
and panel data models. 

Monetary Economics 

330. Monetary Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 31 2 or consent. Sources and determinants of supply 
of money; demand for money for transactions and speculative purposes; general equilibrium theory 
of money, interest, prices, and output; role of money in policy. 

334. Monetary Economics 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 330. Further topics in monetary economics. 
2 1 4 WVU Graduate Catalog 






Public Economics 

241. Public Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Economic roles of the public 
sector. Particular attention to market failure, redistributing income, the financing of public sector 
activities, relationships between federal, state, and local governments, and public choice. 

340. Public Economics 1. 3 HR. PR: ECON 31 0. Economic role of government in a mixed economy 
with regard to topics such as resource allocation and distribution of income; social choice mecha- 
nisms; fiscal federalism; and revenue. 

344. Public Economics 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 340. Continuation of public economics. 

Public Regulation and Control 

241. Public Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Economic roles of the public 
sector. Particular attention to market failure, redistributing income, the financing of public sector 
activities, relationships between federal, state, and local governments, and public choice. 

245. Government and Business. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Examination of market 
structure, conduct, and performance. Analysis of market regulation including antitrust laws and 
regulation of monopolies. 

246. Transportation Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 51 or 55. Economic and institutional analysis of 
the domestic transportation system of the United States. Topics include role of transportation, 
carrier characteristics and services, transportation rates and costs, regulation of transportation. 

345. Industrial Organization. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and graduate standing or consent. Economic 
analysis of market structure, conduct, and performance; in-depth evaluation of markets and in- 
dustries in the United States and the effect of government intervention on firm behavior. 

349. Public Regulation of Business. I or II. 3 HR. Economic analysis of regulation of specific 
industries such as public utilities. 

International Economics 

250. International Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Development of trade 
among nations; theories of trade; policies, physical factors, trends, barriers to trade. Determina- 
tion of exchange rates. Open economy macroeconomics. 

350. International Trade. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310. Contemporary theories of international trade; 
analysis of current problems in world trade. 

354. International Macroeconomics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 312 Current theories and policies concern- 
ing balance of payments, international capital movements, and foreign exchange, and their rela- 
tion to the macro economy. 

Regional Economics 

255. Regional Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 51 or 55. Analysis of the regional economy's spatial 
dimension, emphasizing interregional capital and labor mobility, the role of cities, objectives and 
issues of regional policy, lagging regions and Appalachia, growth poles, and regional growth and 
income distribution. 

257. Urban Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Analyzes growth, decline, and 
socioeconomic problems of cities. Topics include the development of cities, urban spatial struc- 
ture and land-use patterns, poverty and discrimination, housing, urban transportation and con- 
gestion, local government structure, and urban fiscal problems. 

355. Advanced Regional Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and graduate standing or consent. 
Regional income and flow of funds estimation, regional cyclical behavior and multiplier analysis, 
industrial location and analysis, techniques of regional input-output measurement, impact of local 
government reorganization on regional public service and economic development. 

357. Advanced Urban Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310. Theory, policy, and empirical research 
regarding growth and decline of cities, urban spatial structure and land-use patterns, intra-metro- 
politan employment location, urban transportation, housing, housing market discrimination, local 
government structure, fiscal problems, and urban redevelopment. 

358. Spatial Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 or consent. Spatial dimension incorporated into 
the study of economic activity; spatial competition, market area analysis, locational equilibrium 
analysis, general spatial equilibrium. 

359. Seminar in Regional Economics. 3 HR. 

Economics 215 



Labor Economics 

260. Labor Economics. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Labor market analysis. Topics 
include wage and employment determination, human capital theory, discrimination, unemploy- 
ment, migration, effects of unions and government regulation, and life-cycle patterns of work. 

360. Advanced Labor Economics 1. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310. Topics in advanced labor market 
analysis including structure of wages, investment in human capital, discrimination, effects of unions 
and government regulation and life-cycle issues. 

364. Advanced Labor Economics 2. 3 HR. PR: ECON 360. Continuation of Advanced Human 
Resource Economics. 

Economic History 

270. American Economic History. I or II. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55. Central issues in the 
development of the American economy. 

370. Economic History. 3 HR. Examination of the methods of research and issues in economic 
history of the United States. 

374. Seminar in Economic History. 3 HR. 

Economic Development 

213. Economic Development. 3 HR. PR: ECON 54 and 55. The problems, changes, and principal 
policy issues faced by nonindustrialized countries. 

Energy and Environmental Economics 

380. Energy Economics. 3 HR. PR: Graduate standing and consent. Welfare analysis of supply 
interruptions and the foreign dependence question. Study of various energy resources in refer- 
ence to policy alternatives under variant growth conditions and input-output models. Examination 
of coal industry and coal externalities. 

384. Environmental Economics. 3 HR. PR: ECON 310 and ECON 380 or MER 345 and graduate 
standing or consent. Examination of the theoretical and empirical literature dealing with externali- 
ties (pollution), the relationships between pollution and social costs, the relationships between 
energy production and environmental quality, and the optimal strategies for pollution abatement. 

Other Economics Courses 

299. Readings in Economics. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: ECON 54 and ECON 55 and departmental 
approval. Students will develop and carry out a program of specialized readings under the super- 
vision of a cooperating instructor. 

390. Independent Reading in Economics. 3-6 HR. Supervised readings. For graduate students in 
special areas. 

409. Research Design and Methodology. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Completion of the comprehensive 
theory exams or consent. Basic research approaches based on examples from the student's own 
work, papers presented at the departmental research seminar series, and economics literature in 
general. 

491. Seminar in Applied Economic Analysis. 3 HR. PR: 12 HR. of graduate-level economics. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

Industrial Relations 

Dietrich Schaupp, Coordinator, Industrial Relations 
116 Business and Economics Building 
Degrees Offered: 

Master of Science 

Industrial Relations Area of Emphasis available for 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The Department of Management and Industrial Relations offers a master of science in 
industrial relations. The AACSB accredited program of study prepares students for pro- 
fessional positions in human resources (employee relations) and labor relations. Course 

2 1 6 WVU Graduate Catalog 



work can be structured to prepare students for doctoral studies in industrial relations, 
economics, management, or law. 

Doctor of Philosophy Studies 

The department operates, in conjunction with the Department of Economics, an in- 
dustrial relations Doctor of Philosophy option. Master's students who plan to pursue the 
industrial relations option in the Ph.D. program in economics should align their master's 
work with the degree requirements. 

Entry-level professional opportunities for IR graduates include such positions as em- 
ployee relations associate, assistant personnel manager, human resources administra- 
tor, labor relations representative, professional research analyst, compensation analyst 
and benefits administrator. Other positions include staff representative with organized 
labor, apprentice arbitrator, labor-management consultant, National Labor Relations Board 
field examiner, government employee relations representative, and employment ana- 
lyst. Many graduates are employed by Fortune 500 companies. Some find positions with 
organized labor, all levels of government, and advocacy organizations. The department, 
in conjunction with the WVU Career Services Center, makes a concerted effort to place 
graduates in positions that fulfill student job objectives. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum is a blend of theory, analysis, and pragmatism. Core course work serves 
two purposes: to provide in-depth knowledge and skills pertaining to the human resource 
and labor relations functions of organizations, and to acquaint students with the opera- 
tion of the other organizational business functions. 

IRSA 

Students are encouraged to participate in academic-related extracurricular activities. 
Many are cosponsored by the Industrial Relations Student Association: the ILR 
Newsletter, resume mailings, social events, and honors banquets. Outstanding academic 
achievement is recognized by membership in the Industrial Relations Honor Society. 
The faculty makes Outstanding IR Student awards yearly to persons selected on the 
basis of scholarship, informal leadership and extracurricular activities. 

Financial Aid 

Scholarships are available on a competitive basis to minority students. Additional infor- 
mation and application forms can be obtained from the Director of Graduate Programs. 

GOALS 

Graduate Opportunities for Advanced Level Study (GOALS) is the minority recruiting 
program of a national consortium of IR schools. Minority students admitted to WVU's IR 
program are eligible to compete for full fellowships offered by GOALS. 

Academic Common Market 

The master of science program in industrial relations is an Academic Common 
Market program. Residents of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, 
Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, or Virginia who 
are admitted to the M.S. IR program can pay tuition at West Virginia University's 
instate (resident) rates. 

Admission 

The master of science in industrial relations is interdisciplinary in nature and no spe- 
cific undergraduate major is required. Course work in computer science, labor econom- 
ics, statistics, and business disciplines is helpful. To gain admission into the master of 
science in industrial relations program, an applicant must have a bachelor's degree from 
an accredited institution. Overall grade point average is considered with additional at- 
tention given to the grade point average achieved in the last sixty hours of course work. 

Industrial Rela tions 2 1 7 



Either the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) is required. A resume is a requirement of the application process. No 
action is taken on an application for admission until a GMAT or GRE score is submitted. 
International students must also submit a satisfactory TOEFL score. 

Although not required, applicants may wish to send additional supportive material, 
including letters in support of their application, reference letters, a resume of work expe- 
rience, and an example of written work. 

Application Deadlines 

Students may enter the graduate program in summer or fall sessions. Application dead- 
lines are two months before the start of classes in the term for which admission is sought. 
Later applications, while acceptable, may diminish the chances for admission due to the 
graduate class being filled. Since no admission decision can be made without the 
applicant's GMAT/GRE score being submitted, applicants should keep in mind the GMAT/ 
GRE test schedule. 

Institute of Industrial and Labor Relations 

The mission of the Institute of Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) is to coordinate 
instruction, research, and public service activities, which embrace a study of the ele- 
ments of human resources development uniquely identified with the economy of West 
Virginia. Membership is open to faculty who have an interest in the mission of the ILR. 
The ILR serves as a means of rational response to economic trends based on an amal- 
gamation of the three University functions: faculty/student research on a continuing ba- 
sis in search of human resource development possibilities; use of research results in 
credit instruction to produce a growing cadre of graduates aware of and trained to be 
able to contribute to the state's economic goals; and, using both of the former, extension 
and public service efforts designed to place the state's human resource development 
and use activities on their most economically rational courses. 

IR Degree Program 

ILR 260 Survey of the Employment Relations 3 HR. 

ILR 262 Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations 3 HR. 

PR: Econ 160 or Consent 

ILR 303 Critical Thinking and HR Research Methods 3 HR. 

ILR 304 Industrial Relations Theory and Strategy 3 HR. 

IRL305 Employment Law 3 HR. 

ILR 306 Performance Management and Training 3 HR. 

ILR 307 Conflict Management Processes 3 HR. 

ILR 308 Organizational Change and Renewal 3 HR. 

ILR 309 Staffing and Selection 3 HR. 

ILR 320 Human Resource Information Systems 3 HR. 

ILR 321 Managing the Culturally Diverse Workforce 3 HR. 

ILR 322 International Industrial Relations 3 HR. 

ILR 330 Compensation Issues 3 HR. 

ILR 334 Work Group Dynamics and Leadership 3 HR. 

ILR 337 Practicum in Industrial Interviewing 3 HR. 

ILR 340 Arbitration Theory and Practice 3 HR. 

ILR 343 Negotiation Strategy 3 HR. 

ILR 344 Benefits 3 HR. 

ILR 345 Equal Employment Opportunity Problems 3 HR. 



218 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Tentative Recommended Course Scheduling 



Select one elective each semester or term 

Summer I 

307 Conflict Management 

Renewal 
Accounting/Finance/CBK* 
Management/Marketing/CBK* 
337 = Interviewing** 

Fall Spring 

303 Critical Thinking & Research 

Methods 
344 Benefits 

330 Compensation Issues 
262/362 A Collective Bargaining 
322 s International Industrial Relations 
345* Equal Employment Opportunity 

Problems 
334 B Group Dynamics and Leadership 



Summer II 

308 B Organizational Change and 

34 3 = Negotiation 

32 1* Managing Cultural Diversity" 



304 Industrial Relations Theory and 
Strategy 

305 Employment Law 

306 Performance Management and 

Training 
309 Staffing and Selection 
340"" Arbitration 
320 = Human Resource Information 

Systems 



'Courses designed for entering students that do not have undergraduate background in business and economics. 
Total program credit requirements for nonbusiness related undergraduates majors are 48 credit hours; for business- 
related undergraduates the required credit hours are 42. 
"Tentative 

'Elective - Choose one. 

A - For internship scheduling purposes only, ILR 362 may be substituted for ILR 307. 
B -For internship scheduling purposes only, ILR 334 may be substituted for ILR 308. 

GPA 

The industrial relations program requires that the student maintain a grade-point average 
of at least 3.0 on all work taken as a graduate student while enrolled in the College of 
Business and Economics. In addition, the student must maintain a 3.0 average in all work 
counting toward the graduate degree. A student whose cumulative grade-point average 
falls below 2.75 will be placed on probation. If the student's average is not brought up to 
2.75 by the end of the following semester, the student will be suspended from the program. 
A grade below C in more than one course taken while enrolled as a graduate student will 
result in suspension from the program. 

Industrial Relations Emphasis in the Economics Ph.D. Program 

Graduate work in industrial relations typically is interdisciplinary in nature. The Ph.D. 
emphasis retains this orientation while providing students with a Ph.D. level of understand- 
ing of economic theory and economic analysis. Students in the industrial relations option 
take the nine core courses in the Ph.D. in economics program, take comprehensive exami- 
nations in microeconomic theory and macroeconomic theory, and follow the rules and re- 
quirements for obtaining the economics Ph.D. 

Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR) 

260. Survey of the Employment Relationship. I. 3 HR. PR: 58 credits completed. Overview of 
employee and labor relations; management techniques, teams, labor-management relations, em- 
ployment law, benefits, compensation, education and training programs, and current issues. 

262. Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations. 3 HR. PR: ECON 260 or department approval. 
Examination of the theory and practice of collective bargaining. Topics include economic and 
historical environment, labor law, unionization, contract negotiation, patterns in contract content, 
conflict resolution, grievance handling, and an introduction to arbitration. 



Industrial Relations 219 



301 . Industrial Relations Analytical Techniques 1. 3 HR. PR: Admission to the ILR graduate pro- 
gram and CS 5 or equivalent. Introduction to the software and hardware appropriate for use in 
human resource applications, emphasizing efficient and effective use of previously developed 
software. Introduction to quantitative analytical decision-making techniques. 

302. Industrial Relations Analytical Techniques 2. 3 HR. PR: Admission to the ILR graduate pro- 
gram. Further development of the quantitative analytical techniques and of business information 
systems used in the human resources field. Emphasis on quantitative decision-making and infor- 
mation systems in an industrial relations setting. 

303. Critical Thinking and HR Research Methods. I. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Philosophy and 
methods of critical thinking and human resources research methods and practices. 

304. /. R. Theory and Strategy. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Corequisite: ILR 262. Description and 
analysis of employee workplace governance systems in competitive and non-competitive mar- 
kets. Search for rational employer-employee relationships in the US and internationally. 

305. Employment Law. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Corequisite: ILR 262. Survey of the legal principles 
guiding the employer-employee relationship. Examines laws regulating hiring, job opportunity, 
discrimination, affirmative action, sexual harassment, wages, benefits, privacy right, health, safety, 
employment at will, layoffs, and termination. 

306. Performance Management and Training. II. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Development of 
individual employees in an organization; performance evaluation, discipline of problem employ- 
ees, identifying training needs, and design and delivery of training programs. 

307. Conflict Management Processes. S. I. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. PR: Consent. Sources of 
conflict in the workplace and processes utilized to deal with that conflict. Theories of conflict 
management, industry practices, and specific techniques for productive channeling of conflict. 
Significant experiential component. 

308. Organizational Change and Renewal. S, II. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Organizational evo- 
lution as a result of multiple change process, including employee involvement, empowerment, 
high performance organizations, process consulting, and goal setting. Emphasis on organiza- 
tional and union relationships. 

309. Staffing and Selection. II. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Theoretical, practical, and legal is- 
sues involved in staffing and selection in organizations; human resource planning, recruiting, 
employment testing, statistical analysis, legal issues, and selection methods. 

310. Human Resources Economics. 3 HR. PR: Admission to the ILR graduate program. Consid- 
eration of the conditions of employment and unemployment at both macro and micro levels under 
varying degrees of completion, including the process of labor force preparation, labor market data 
and policy. 

320. HR Information Systems. II. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Use of computers for human re- 
source management; HRIS planning, development and implementation; evaluating existing soft- 
ware; development of a database unique to human resource management. 

321. Manage Culture Diverse Workfc. I, S. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Perceptions involving 
cultural diversity issues. Composition of the workforce and its impact on the corporate culture. 
Management theories, sociological paradigms and conflict resolution in addressing multi-cultural 
issues in the workplace. 

322. International Industrial Relations. I. 3 HR. Corequisite: ILR 262. Analyzes the human re- 
source and labor relations practices of firms and economies as they relate to the global market; 
basics of international business, legal/governmental environmental, labor movements, and in- 
dustrial relations practices. 

330. Compensation Issues. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Seminar in compensation designed to develop 
further understanding of compensation theory and practice. Topic areas will include labor supply, 
wage theory, legal constraints, motivation, equity theory, organizational development as well as 
compensation structure and administration. 



220 WVU Graduate Catalog 



332. American Trade Unionism. 3 HR. PR: ILR 262 or 316 or consent. Examines the rise of American 
unionism and traces historical factors shaping its philosophy. Topics include economic conditions and 
union history, comparisons of AFL and CIO structures and the AFL-CIO as a government. 

333. Seminar: Quality of Work Life. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Analysis of current trends and approaches 
in "quality of work life improvement" with special attention to developments in participative man- 
agement, job enrichment and gain sharing. Results of current research are featured. 

334. Work Group Dynamics and Leadership. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Small group or individual re- 
search on topics related to leadership and group dynamics in the work environment including 
training and other human relations programs. 

337. Practicum in Industrial Interviewing. 3 HR. PR: ILR 312 and consent. Experiential learning of 
industrial interviewing techniques covering legal and technical aspects of employment interview- 
ing and other types of interviewing. 

340. Arbitration Theory and Practice. 3 HR. PR: ILR 262 and consent. Study of the purpose of 
arbitration, trends, principles of contract construction, hearing procedure evidence, remedies, 
training and education of arbitrators, training of advocates, and decision writing. Students will 
arbitrate mock cases. 

343. Negotiation Strategy. S, II. PR: Consent. Corequisite: ILR 262. Theory and practice of both 
principled negotiations and position bargaining; extensive role play and technique building exer- 
cises for individual and team negotiations; detailed preparation methods for all types of personal 
and professional negotiations. 

344. Benefits. 3 HR. Considers employee benefits from the perspective of the industrial relations 
specialist who is responsible for articulating and administering a corporate program. Includes 
study of all benefits covered by major federal legislation. 

345. Equal Employment Opportunity Problems. 3 HR. PR: Consent. A series of lectures by specialists 
in equal employment opportunity affairs. Lectures will include attorneys, directors of state and national 
EEO agencies, and representatives of business and industry and the labor movement. 

391 . Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491 . Advanced Study. 1-6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



Industrial Rela tions 22 1 



CORE Courses 
Accounting (ACCT) 

311. Financial Accounting for Decision Making. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Basic accounting assumptions 
and standards underlying financial statements, the significance of financial statement measurements, 
and the relevance of such data for planning and control. Emphasis on financial statement and 
cash-flow analysis. 

Business Law (BLAW) 

311. Legal and Regulatory Environment. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Examination of the legal environ- 
ment in which business decisions are made and the response of the legal environment to change. 
Familiarization with the role of administrative agencies in the regulatory process. 

Economics (ECON) 

317. Economic Decision Making. 2 HR. PR: ECON 54 or consent. (Primarily for M.B. A. students.) 
Analysis of the firm as an optimizing unit operating in the market place. Examination of product 
demand, production and costs, pricing theory and practices, risk, and capital budgeting. 

Finance (FIN) 

311. Managerial Finance. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Analysis of the standard financial activities of the 
firm including: financial planning, structure of financing, and asset selection. Introduction to mi- 
crocomputer problem solution. 

Management (MANG) 

301 . Organizational Behavior and Ethics. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Interpersonal relationships through 
which administration becomes effective. Emphasis on human factors, but influences of economic 
and technological factors also are considered. Focus on ethics and importance of harmony be- 
tween individual needs and organization goals. 

311. Management Information Systems. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Examines computer technology, 
applications, information systems, and performance. Computer system planning, selection and 
implementation. Computer impact upon management, organization, and society from a manage- 
rial viewpoint. 

321. Operations Management/Applied Quantitative Analysis. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Review of con- 
cepts, techniques and models encountered in manufacturing and service operations. Modeling 
approach and computer applications in operations management and management science are 
emphasized. 

351. Policy and Strategy. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Capstone course. Integrates functional knowledge 
with strategy formulation and strategy implementation concepts. Cases of organizations varying 
in size, national affiliation, and profit orientation are analyzed with special emphasis on ethics and 
social responsibility. 

Marketing (MKTG) 

311 . Marketing Management. 2 HR. Introduction to marketing management with specific empha- 
sis on consumer behavior and market segmentation, product planning, promotion, distribution, 
and pricing. 



222 WVU Graduate Catalog 



College of Creative Arts 

Philip J. Faini, M.M., Dean and Director 

J. Bernard Schultz, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 

The College of Creative Arts, composed of the Divisions of Art, Music, and Theatre, 
serves an academic and cultural function and provides an educational and interdiscipli- 
nary environment for the exploration, advancement, and understanding of the visual and 
performing arts. The College boasts a distinguished faculty of actors, artists, composers, 
conductors, directors, instrumentalists, vocalists, and writers who bring to the college a 
commitment to a creative process of artistic growth which is shared with each student. 
Through teaching, research, and service, the faculty of the college provides students the 
professional preparation to achieve the highest level of performance, scholarly research, 
and creative activity. 

Graduate programs in art, music, and theatre are characterized by quality and diversity 
of faculty, students, and curricular opportunity. Each division is an accredited member of the 
nationally recognized accrediting agency for professional instruction in the discipline: art 
programs by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design; music programs by 
the National Association of Schools of Music; and theatre programs by the National 
Association of Schools of Theatre. 

The College of Creative Arts is committed to providing the highest levels of creative, 
intellectual, and cultural experiences in art, music, and theatre to the University, the state, 
and the region. In an environment rich with art exhibitions, concerts, and plays, students 
gain the knowledge, skills, experience, and inspiration necessary for professional suc- 
cess. Students, faculty, and visiting artists present a full calendar of performances and 
exhibitions which are open to the public. 

The Creative Arts Center, which houses the college, is a modern, multimillion-dollar 
instructional and performance facility with three theatres, two recital halls/recording stu- 
dios; scenery, painting, drawing, design, costume, printmaking, sculpture, ceramic, and 
instrumental studios; additional art studios; and two art galleries. 

The Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.) curricula in performance (piano, organ, voice, 
percussion, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, trumpet, trombone, tuba, violin, viola, 
cello, or double bass) or composition, and the Ph.D. curriculum in music prepare stu- 
dents for careers as teachers in higher education. The master of fine arts (M.F.A.) is a 
terminal degree in art and theatre that prepares students for careers in ceramics, graphic 
design, painting, printmaking, sculpture, acting, or theatre design/technology. 

The master of music degree enhances undergraduate programs in performance, mu- 
sic education, theory, music history, and composition. The master of arts has concentra- 
tions in art education, art history, and studio art. 

For further information, please contact: 

Graduate advisor, Division of Art at (304) 293-2140 x 3141 

Director of graduate studies in music, Division of Music at (304) 293-5511 x 3196 

Chair, Division of Theatre at (304) 293-2020 x 3120 
Our mailing address is College of Creative Arts, Creative Arts Center, West Virginia 
University, P.O. Box 6111 Morgantown, WV 26506-6111. 

Special Admission Information 

The College of Creative Arts offers graduate programs leading to terminal degrees in 
art, music, and theatre. Prospective students apply for admission through the University's 
Office of Admissions and Records. All candidates for graduate degrees must conform to 
University regulations for graduate study. Requirements for admission to specific pro- 
grams are included in the program descriptions. Most programs require an audition or a 
portfolio review as a part of the admission process. 

College of Creative Arts 223 



Full graduate assistants receive a stipend and remission of tuition. Approximately 11 
graduate assistantships in art, 28 in music, and 14 in theatre are available each year. 
Application for these assistantships should be made to each division; the application 
deadline for art is March 1 and October 1 5, for music March 1 , and for theatre April 1 . 

Graduate Programs 

Art M.A. 

Music M.M. D.M.A., Ph.D. 

Theatre M.F.A. 

Visual Art M.F.A. 

Graduate Faculty 

* Indicates regular membership in the graduate faculty. 

* Indicates associate membership in the graduate faculty. 

Art 
Professors 

r Robert P. Anderson, M.F.A. (Alfred U.). Ceramics. 

*Eve Faulkes, M.F.A. (R.I. Sch. Design). Graphic design. 

Clifford A. Harvey, B.F.A. (Mpls. C. Art & Design). Graphic design. 

t Alison Helm, M.F.A. (Syracuse U.). Sculpture. 

f MargaretT. Rajam, Ph.D. (U. Mich.). Emerita. 

Bernard Schultz, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Associate Dean, Academic Affairs; Art history, Italian 

renaissance, Modern art, Art theory. 
Associate Professors 

*Victoria Fergus, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Art education, Undergraduate advisor. 
Christopher Hocking, M.F.A. (LSU). Drawing, Painting, Printmaking. 
r Paul Krainak, M.F.A. (North. III. U.). Painting, Graduate advisor. 
r Sergio Soave, M.F.A. (WVU). Interim Chairperson, Printmaking. 
n/Villiam J. Thomas, Ph.D. (Penn St. U.). Art education. 
Assistant Professors 

*lain Machell, M.F.A. (SUNY-Albany). Visual Foundations, Sculpture. 
Janet Snyder, Ph.D. (Columbia University). Art history, Medieval art, Native American art, 

Women in Art. 
Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Kristina Olson, M.A. (SUNY-Stony Brook). Art Criticism and Contemporary Art. Curator. 

Music 
Professors 

tPeter Amstutz, D.M.A. (Peabody Conserv.) Coordinator, Keyboard instruments. Piano. 

tJohn Beall, Ph.D. (U. of Rochester, Eastman Sch. of Mus.). Composition, Theory. 

Philip J. Faini, M.M. (WVU). Dean and Director, College of Creative Arts. Percussion, African 

music. 
n/Villiam P. Haller, D.M.A. (N. Tex. St. U.). F.A.G.O. Organ, Theory. 
T Barton Hudson, Ph.D. (Ind. U.). Musicology, Renaissance music. 
Christine B. Kefferstan, D.M.A. (U. Cincinnati). Piano. 
Cerald Lefkoff, Ph.D. (Cath. U. Am.). Theory, Electronic music, Viola. 
f James E. Miltenberger, D.M.A. (U. Roch. -Eastman Sch. of Mus.). Piano, Piano repertoire, 

Jazz. 
f Augusto Paglialunga, M.M. (New England Conserv.). Voice. 
Timothy Peterman, D.M.A. (U. North Tenn). Coordinator, Percussion studies. 
r William Skidmore, M.M. (U. III.). Coordinator, Stringed instruments, Cello. 
Cilbert Trythall, D.M.A. (Cornell U.). Composition, Electronic music, Theory. 
r John F Weigand, D.M.A. (Florida St. U.). Coordinator, Woodwind instruments. Coordinator, 

Undergraduate admissions; Clarinet, Chamber music. 

224 WVU Graduate Catalog 



r Don G. Wilcox, M.A. (Cal. St. at Long Beach). Director of Bands. Coordinator, Conducting. 

'Cecil B. Wilson, Ph.D. (Case West. Res. U.). Assistant Vice President for Faculty Develop- 
ment. Musicology, 19th Century Music, Orchestration. 

Associate Professors 

tDavid Bess, Ph.D. (WVU). Coordinator, music education. Instrumental music education. 

*Joyce A. Catalfano, M.M. (Ithaca Col.). Flute, Chamber music. 

*John E. Crotty, Ph.D. (U. Roch. -Eastman Sch. of Mus.). Coordinator, Theory-Composition, 
Theory, Analysis. 

f Terry B. Ewell, M.A. (U. Wash.). Chairperson. Bassoon, Theory. 

*Curtis Johnson, M.M. (WVU). Saxophone, Jazz. 

*Janis-Rozena Peri, M.M. (Miami U.). Voice. 

tJanet Robbins, Ph.D. (Ohio State U.). General music education. 

Bonnie Sturm, Ph.D. (U. Oklah.). Piano, Group piano, Piano pedagogy. 

f Robert H. Thieme, Jr., M.M. (WVU). Director, WVU Opera Theatre; Coordinator, Voice studies. 
Opera, Vocal repertoire, Accompanying, Coaching. 

Virginia Thompson, D.M.A. (U. Iowa). Director of Graduate Studies; Horn, Chamber music. 

Christopher Wilkinson, Ph.D. (Rutgers U.). Coordinator, Music History-Literature. Musicology, 

20th-century music. 

*John Winkler, D.Mus. (Northwestern U.). Coordinator, Brass and percussion instruments. 
Trumpet, Theory, Chamber music. 

Assistant Professors 

*Cynthia Anderson, M.M. (Manhattan School). Oboe, Chamber music. 

f John Fadial, M.M. (U. Roch. -Eastman Sch. of Music). Violin, Chamber music. 

t H. Keith Jackson, D.M.A. (Arizona State U.). Trombone, Jazz. 

tPeter Lightfoot, Prof. Cert. (Julliard Sch. Mus.). Voice. 

*Paul Scea, M.M. (U. of Iowa). Director, Jazz Studies. 

f Kathleen Shannon, D.M.A. (U. Fl.). Director of Choral Activities. Choral music education, 
Conducting. 

f Molly Weaver, M.M. (U. Mich.). Music education. 

Adjunct Assistant Faculty 

*Carol Beall, M.M. (Texas Tech U.). Part-time; Piano. 

*Mary Ferer, Ph.D. (U. of Illinois). Part-time; History, Appreciation. 

*Andrew Kohn, Ph.D. (U. of Pittsburgh). Part-time; Double Bass, Theory, Analysis. 

Theatre 
Professors 

f Frank Gagliano, M.F.A. (Columbia U.). Claude Worthington Benedum Professor. Playwriting. 

f Joann Spencer-Siegrist, M.F.A. (U. Ga.). Puppetry, Creative drama. 

tJohn C. Whitty, Ph.D. (U. Iowa). Theatre history. 

f M. Kathryne Wiedebusch, M.A. (WVU). Dance. 

Associate Professors 

T W. James Brown, M.F.A. (U. Wash.). Theatre design. 

*Theresa Davis, M.F.A. (Virginia Commonwealth U.). Acting. 

tJerry McGonigle, M.F.A. (Am. Conserv. Theatre). Acting. 

t Victor McQuiston, M.F.A. (Ohio St. U.). Technical direction. 

f Linda D. Milian, M.F.A. (Rutgers U.). Costuming. 

Joseph Olivieri, M.F.A. (Am. Conserv. Theatre). Acting, Directing. 

t \A/illiam J. Winsor, M.F.A. (Ohio St. U.). Chairperson, Scenic design. 

Assistant Professors 

*Julie Booth, M.F.A. (U. Tenn-Knoxville). Visiting. Theatre lighting design. 

*Margaret McKowen, M.F.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin). Costume design. 

Thomas O'Connor, M.F.A. (Ohio State Univ.). Acting/Movement. 

Katherine Udall, M.F.A. (UC San Diego). Acting/Voice. 



College of Creative Arts 225 



Art 

Paul Krainak, Graduate Advisor, Division of Art 

419-A Creative Arts Center 

Degrees Offered: Master of Arts, Master of Fine Arts 

The graduate programs in art lead to a master of arts with emphasis in art, art educa- 
tion, or art history (one to two years or 30 credit hours) and to a master of fine arts with 
emphasis in visual art (two to three years or 60 hours). Both of these programs are highly 
selective and closely integrated parts of the professional education in art offered by the 
Division of Art. All applicants are expected to have artistic maturity and the motivation to 
achieve excellence in their areas of concentration. 

Accreditation 

The Division of Art is an accredited institutional member of the National Association 
of Schools of Art and Design, the only nationally recognized accrediting agency for 
professional art instruction. Applicants to programs in art must comply with the standards 
for admission set by West Virginia University, the College of Creative Arts, and the 
Division of Art. 

Master of Fine Arts 

The master of fine arts is the terminal degree in studio art; it prepares students for 
professional practice in art. Our selective and limited enrollment insure regular individual 
contact with a dedicated, diverse faculty, who are committed to a sustained professional 
exchange with each student. A collaboratively designed curriculum is augmented by weekly 
critiques engaging all studio majors and faculty. Media experimentation is encouraged. 
Students must be able to apply and communicate a diverse body of knowledge relating 
historical, cultural, contemporary, and aesthetic issues to their professional practice. Stu- 
dents are expected to articulate and defend their position within the context of contempo- 
rary art discourse. 

Master of Arts 

Master of Arts students in studio art, art education, or art history critically study, 
explore, and evaluate their chosen content area, ensuring a solid foundation for further 
professional practice or research. 

Reviews 

All students enter the graduate programs in art as preliminary candidates. Students in 
the M.F.A. program are reviewed for advancement at the end of their first year of study 
or upon the completion of 24-30 credit hours. Students in the M.A. program are reviewed 
at the end of their first semester of study or upon the completion of 12-15 credit hours. 
A satisfactory review allows students to have degree candidate status. Candidacy status 
must be approved by the student's graduate committee. All students in degree programs, 
either M.F.A. or M.A., must prepare a written thesis. A graduate exhibition is required of 
all M.F.A. students. 

Deficiencies 

Before students are admitted, they must meet any deficiencies in their undergraduate 
preparation. Credits taken to erase deficiencies do not count toward a graduate degree. 

The Division of Art has high expectations for its graduate students. Because of this, certain 
standards of achievement exceed the minimum standards set by the University for all 
graduate students. The Division of Art reserves the right to impose stricter limitations on all 

226 WVU Graduate Catalog 



art graduate students. Credit hours in courses with an earned grade of "C" do not 
automatically count toward graduate degree requirements. The graduate committee 
and the divisional chairperson have the right to declare such credit hours unacceptable. 

Supplies 

All graduate art majors are required to purchase most of their personal equipment and 
expendable supplies. Some studio areas purchase bulk supplies for student use in their 
courses from an art fee. 

Thesis 

All candidates for a graduate degree in art must prepare a written thesis (or graduate 
project) related to their work and activity as a graduate student. The chairperson of the 
student's graduate committee supervises the preparation of the thesis, which must be com- 
pleted at least one month before the anticipated graduation date. The thesis must be pre- 
pared according to the form prescribed in the WVU regulations governing the preparation 
of dissertations and theses as well as divisional guidelines, unless an exception is autho- 
rized in advance by the student's graduate committee and the division chairperson. 

Program Transfer 

A preliminary candidate in a graduate art program is not guaranteed acceptance into 
another graduate art program. A change from the M.F.A. program to the M.A. program 
(or the reverse) must be approved by the graduate faculty of the Division of Art. Under 
normal conditions, such a change is not considered until the student has established 
credibility by successfully completing 12-15 approved credit hours of study at WVU. A 
change to a program outside the Division of Art must be approved by the receiving unit. 
To make an application for a double degree program or special interdepartmental pro- 
grams at the graduate level, students must have written prior approval of the division 
chairperson. 

Admission Requests for application forms for admission to graduate degree programs 
in art must be addressed to the Office of Admissions and Records, West Virginia Univer- 
sity, P.O. Box 6009, Morgantown, WV 26506-6009. Applicants must specify the degree 
and subject area of their choice and return the application and transcripts from each 
college or university previously attended to the above address with a $25 nonrefundable 
processing fee. 

Portfolio All applicants for both the M.F.A. and the M.A. (studio and art education) must 
present a portfolio for admission to the Division of Art. Applicants for art history must 
submit a copy of a written research project. Applicants should take care to select slides 
of recent and representative work for inclusion in the portfolio. The portfolio must contain 
a statement of purpose, and three letters of recommendation from college faculty or 
persons knowledgeable of the applicant's interests and abilities, and twenty 35mm slides. 
Each slide should be labeled with name, date of completion, size of work, and type of 
medium and arranged in a plastic slide holder for mailing. The complete portfolio, with 
the purpose statement, three letters, and 20 slides, should be submitted to: Graduate 
Advisor, Division of Art, College of Creative Arts, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6111, 
Morgantown, WV 26506-6111 Provide a stamped, self-addressed envelope to assure 
prompt, safe return of the slides. 



Art 227 



Master of Fine Arts in Visual Arts 

The Master of Fine Arts, a professionally-oriented terminal degree in the studio arts, 
requires a baccalaureate degree in art or its equivalent for admission. Preparation should 
include 12 hours of art history, 70 hours of studio art related to professional needs, and 36 
hours of general education. The suggested distribution of studies for the 60 credit hour 
program is: 

Art studio majorarea 36 Hr. 

Art studio elective 6 Hr. 

Teaching practicum/Professional practice 3 Hr. 

Graduate seminar (or approved elective) 3 Hr. 

Art history 6 Hr. 

Graduate exhibition and thesis 6 Hr. 

To earn the M.F.A., a student must complete a combined (undergraduate and 
graduate) total of 1 1 8 hours in studio, 1 8 hours in art history, and the appropriate number 
of credit hours in general education courses. 

All students in the M.F.A. program are required to submit a statement of intention after 
completion of 1 2 credit hours, to indicate the direction and implementation of their studio 
involvement. 

Transfers In addition to the application materials listed, transfer students must ask to 
transfer graduate work completed elsewhere. Transcripts must accompany the written 
request. Transfer credit is not automatic. The art faculty review committee, the graduate 
advisor, and the division chairperson will determine how much, if any, previous graduate- 
level work may be transferred. At least 60 percent of the work for the M.F.A. must be 
completed at WVU in the studio arts. 

Residence Requirements The M.F.A. student must complete the stated requirements 
in order to graduate, usually in a two-year period. Most students take 15 hours per 
semester. All students accepted into the M.F.A. program are required to spend four full- 
time semesters (excluding summer sessions) in residence. Concentrations for the 
M.F.A. include ceramics, graphic design, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. 

Course Distribution 

The following is the recommended distribution of required M.F.A. courses: 
First Year— Preliminary Candidate 

Art studio major area 18 Hr. 

Art studio elective 3 Hr. 

Graduate seminar 6 Hr. 

Art history* 3 Hr. 

Total 30 Hr. 

'Graduate credits in art history must be at the 300-level (graduate) and are in addition to courses taken or required at the 
undergraduate level. 

Second Year— M.F.A. Candidate 

Art studio major area 18 Hr. 

Art studio elective 3 Hr. 

Art history* 3 Hr. 

Graduate exhibition and thesis** 6 Hr. 

Total 30 Hr. 

'Graduate credits in art history must be at the 300-level (graduate) and are in addition to courses taken or required at the 
undergraduate level. 

"Graduate exhibition and thesis (Art 400) will include organized graduate seminars, committee meetings, and exhibition 
preparation discussions. 



228 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Master of Arts in Art Education 

Art education is a popular option for graduate study in art. Specialization in art 
education requires the completion of 30 credit hours program. The exact course of study 
is determined through consultation with the student's advisor. The art education 
concentration may be completed in one year of full time study. The general distribution 
of graduate credits is as follows: 

Art studio major area 9 Hr. 

Art studio elective 6 Hr. 

Art education or approved studies 12 Hr. 

Art 402 Master's in Art Education Project 3 Hr. 

Total 30 Hr. 

Every graduate student is required to complete a graduate project. The graduate art 
faculty recommend those students who may be required to hold a graduate exhibition. 

Master of Arts in Art History 

The art history concentration is accredited by the National Association of Schools of 
Art and Design. For information about this option, please contact the coordinator of art 
history or the graduate advisor in the Division of Art. The general distribution of graduate 
credits for a concentration in art history is as follows: 

Art history 21 Hr. 

Cognate courses 6 Hr. 

Art 401 (thesis) 3 Hr. 

Total 30 Hr. 

Master of Arts in Studio Art 

The studio art concentration allows students to specialize in ceramics, graphic design, 
painting, printmaking, or sculpture. 

Applicants desiring to begin a course of study leading to the Master of Arts in Art and 
concentration in the studio arts must have a baccalaureate degree in art or the equiva- 
lent. Undergraduate study should include 12 hours of art history, 45 hours of studio art 
related to professional needs, and 36 hours of general education courses. 

The concentration in studio art requires: 

Art studio major area 18 Hr. 

Art studio elective or graduate seminar* 3 Hr. 

Art history** 6 Hr. 

Art 401 (thesis) 3 Hr. 

Total 30 Hr. 

*ln lieu of art studio elective instruction, students may take the graduate seminar course. Exact courses of study are determined in 
consultation with the graduate advisor. 

"Graduate credits in art history must be at the 300-level (graduate) and are in addition to courses taken or required at the under- 
graduate level. 

Requirements 

The student must complete the stated degree requirements in order to graduate. These 
credits can be earned in one year. After consultation with the graduate advisor, students 
specializing in studio arts are required to prepare a study list of courses to be taken to 
satisfy Division of Art requirements. Changes in this list must be requested in writing and 
approved by the chairperson of the division. 



Art 229 



Financial Aid 

Financial aid information is available through the Student Financial Aid Office, West 
Virginia University, P.O. Box 6004, Morgantown WV 26506-6004. Graduate assistant- 
ships in art are awarded to students of exceptional promise by the faculty of the Division 
of Art. Application forms must be requested from the graduate advisor, Division of Art, 
College of Creative Arts, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6111, Morgantown, WV 26506- 
6111, and submitted with the portfolio. 

Art (ART) 

200. Independent Study Studio. I, II. 1-15 HR. Intensive self directed research involving special 
projects in studio production. Areas of study include, but are not limited to, painting, drawing, 
printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, and design. 

201. Independent Study Art History. I, II. 1-15 HR. This class concentrates upon independent 
research, closely supervised, on a topic of students selection. This must be well-defined and 
contain historical, critical, and theoretical issues. Contractual course. 

211. Figure Drawing. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: ART 12 and ART 121. This class concentrates on compo- 
sitional structure from the human figure. Students will investigate the organic nature of the figure 
and its representation in space using a wide variety of media and processes. (May be repeated 
for credit.) 

212. Advanced Drawing. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: ART 211. This class expands media possibilities, and 
examines the variables of image-making while establishing personal expression. The course is 
designed to developing analytical and problem solving skills as well as technical processes. (May 
be repeated for credit.) 

213. Painting. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. The course reaffirms and expands formal criteria established in 
113 and 114 and directs individual research into personal, historical, and contemporary painting 
issues in oil, acrylic, and related media. (May be repeated for credit.) 

223. Graphic Design. I. II. 1-12 HR. Varied hypothetical projects give students a methodology for 
solving applied design projects in a range of formats. This class will deal with a combination of 
computer graphics, book arts, publication design, and multi-media projects. Portfolio review. (May 
be repeated for credit.) 

224. Graphic Design. I, II. 1-9 HR. Senior graphic design studio includes a model studio with real 
clients and projects, most of which are produced and printed. Emphasis is on developing profes- 
sional skills in design and design management. (May be repeated for credit.) 

225. Graphic Design/Senior Project. I, II. 3 Hr . This course is focused on the development of an 
undergraduate thesis in which each project is individually defined with an umbrella topic. Formats 
and content vary but each project culminates in a thesis exhibition and an individual audio/ visual 
presentation. (May be repeated for credit.) 

226. Sculpture. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. Students continue to examine personal iconography as it per- 
tains to aspects of contemporary sculpture. Topics explored are concept-oriented, using stone, 
concrete, glass, and emphasizing craftsmanship and aesthetic issues. (May be repeated for credit.) 

227. Installation Art. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. Students investigate this contemporary art form through a 
series of temporary, site-specific sculptural environments. Conventional art media and concepts 
are challenged as students develop alternative solutions to creative problems. (May be repeated 
for credit.) 

230. Printmaking. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. An exploration of color printmaking, advancing imagery through 
critical contexts. Students focus on technical mastery in lithography, intaglio, relief, and alterna- 
tive processes, expand their knowledge of printmaking*s history and develop creative problem 
solving skills. (May be repeated for credit.) 

232. Alternative Photography. I, II. S. 1-15 HR. Alternative photography emphasizes creating and 
manipulating images from and for the camera. Techniques include the traditional silver gelatin 
print, cyanotypes. liquid light, and gum bichromate. A basic knowledge of photography is recom- 
mended. (May be repeated for credit.) 



230 WVU Graduate Catalog 



233. Photo Design. I, II, S. 3 HR. Emphasis is placed on the use of large and small format cam- 
eras, studio photography, darkroom techniques, and lighting. Projects are developed to comple- 
ment the graphic design studio courses by exploring indoor and outdoor assignments. 

240. Ceramics. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. This intense studio concentration is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for graduate studies and/or professional studio practices. Historical and contemporary 
design issues, kiln design and building, firing, glaze and clay formulation, studio practices and 
advanced level throwing and hand building techniques will be studied. (May be repeated for credit.) 

245. Greek and Roman. I, II. 3 HR. The arts of the Aegean world, c. 2000 BCE, Greece and Rome 
to 400 CE. are examined. The visual examples will be considered critically examined. Architec- 
ture, sculpture, and painting will be included. 

246. Medieval Art. I, II. 3 HR. The arts of Europe from c. 312 to c. 1350 are examined. The 
theoretical, historical, and literary contexts for the images will be established. Architecture, sculp- 
ture, painting, and portable arts will be included. 

247. Northern Renaissance. I, II. 3 HR. The arts of Northern Europe from 1350 to 1560 will be 
studied in a historical and theoretical context. Painting and sculpture will be the focus of study. 

248. Italian Renaissance. I, II. 3 HR. Early Renaissance through Mannerism. The course will 
emphasize both the historical context and theoretical foundation of 15th and 16th-century Italian 
art and architecture. 

249. Baroque. I, II. 3 HR. The course examines art of the late 16th through early 18th centuries, 
both Northern and Southern European examples. Issues of historical context and theoretical in- 
terpretation are emphasized. 

250. Nineteenth Century. I, II. 3 HR. The course focuses upon European and American art from 
the late 18th C. through 1900. Issues of theory, historical, context and literary foundation will be 
considered. 

251. Modern. I, II. 3 HR. The revolutionary experience of modern art, from its foundation in 19th- 
century European movements through the 1950's will be emphasized. Critical theory and histori- 
cal context stressed. 

252. American. I, II. 3 HR. The course will treat the arts in the United States from the Colonial era 
to 1960. Emphasis is placed upon factors which define American art and the critical foundations 
for the works. 

253. Contemporary. I, II. 3 HR. The course explores the various artistic movements from World 
War II to the present. Emphasis will be given to the change from modern to postmodern. Familiar- 
ity with images and critical texts is expected. 

254. Art Theory. I, II. 3 HR. The course will examine development and tradition of the literature of 
art theory and its relationship to artistic practice. 

255. Women in Art. I, II. 3 HR. The course examines the art of female artists and of women as 
subjects in art. There will be a historical view with concentration on 20th-century work. Critical 
theories are emphasized. 

265. Pre-Student Teaching. I, II. 3 HR. PR: ART 165 and ART 166. The course concentrates on 
curriculum development, research methods, and delivery strategies for K-12 art specialists pre- 
paring for their professional semester. 

291 . Special Topics: Art. I, II, S. 3 HR. The class presents occasional topics not otherwise treated 
within the regularly scheduled courses and may include photography, design, architecture, and 
criticism among others. 

295. Senior Seminar. I, II, S. 3 HR. The focus of this seminar is analysis of theoretical and profes- 
sional studio issues as well as trends in contemporary art practice and criticism. Emphasis will be 
on comparative media, interdisciplinary forms of expression and significant cultural concerns out- 
side of visual arts practice. Topics will be coordinated and involve the Visiting Artist Series. 



Art 231 



300. Independent Study Graduate Studio. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: 
Consent. Intensive self directed research involving special projects in studio production. Areas of 
study include, but are not limited to, painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, and 
design. 

301. Independent Study Art History. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. 
Independent research, closely supervised, on topic of student's selection. Proposal must be well- 
defined and contain historical, critical, and theoretical issues. Contractual course. 

313. Graduate Painting. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit). PR: Consent. Encom- 
passes the significant issues and developments of contemporary painting, including visual 
resources, critical and pictorial structures, and technical proficiency to establish a coeherent 
aesthetic vision in the medium. 

323. Graduate Graphic Design. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit). PR: Consent. 
Integration of current and historic design resources leading to the development of a thesis project 
while working within the independent and existing design courses. Areas of special interest 
include the book arts and electronic multi-media. 

324. Graduate Graphic Design/Professional Practice. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. (May be repeated for credit). 
PR: Consent. Students assist and work on projects in a Model Studio setting, helping to coordi- 
nate and manage communication with clients, printers, and undergraduate students in Graphic 
Design Studio 222. 

326. Graduate Sculpture. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit). PR: Consent. Encom- 
passes the significant issues and developments of contemporary 3-dimensional form, including 
visual resources, critical and historic foundations, and technical proficiency designed to establish 
a coherent comprehension of the media. 

330. Graduate Printmaking. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit). PR: Consent. Encom- 
passes the germane aspects of contemporary printmaking including visual resources, theoretical 
and historic structures, and technical processes, designed to establish a rigorous comprehension 
of the medium. Areas of specialization include lithography, intaglio, relief, serigraphy and elec- 
tronic media. 

332. Graduate Photography. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit). PR: Consent. Involves 
the essential problems and developments of current photography, from traditional to digital photo 
processes, theoretical and pictorical foundations and technical proficiency designed to afford a 
coherent aesthetic vision in the medium. 

334. Alternative Media. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit). PR: Consent. Involves the 
primary issues and developments of alternative and interdisciplinary media such as installation, 
video, performance art, or hand-made books along with the critical foundation and technical pro- 
ficiency to establish a comprehensive utilization of chosen forms. 

340. Graduate Ceramics. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. (May be repeated for credit). PR: Consent. Involves 
the essential concerns and developments of contemporary ceramics, including traditional and 
current practices. Emphasis is on technical processes designed to provide a rigorous compre- 
hension and expression in clay. Area of specialization include both functional and sculptural ce- 
ramics. 

345. Greek and Roman. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. The architecture, sculpture, and paintings of the 
Aegean world, c.2000 BCE, Greece and Rome to 400 CE. Critical and historical consideration of 
this time period will be considered. 

346. Medieval Art. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. The arts of Europe from c. 312 to c. 1350. The 
theoretical, historical, and literary contexts for the images will be established. Architecture, sculp- 
ture, painting, and portable arts will be included. 

347. Northern Renaissance. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. The arts of Northern Europe from 1350 to 
1560 will be studied in an historical and theoretical context. Painting and sculpture will be the 
focus of study. 

348. Italian Renaissance. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Early Renaissance through Mannerism. The 
course will emphasize both the historical context and theoretical foundation of 15th and 16th 
century Italian art and architecture. 

232 WVU Graduate Catalog 



349. Baroque. 1,11.3 HR. PR: Consent. Art of the late 1 6th through the early 1 8th centuries, both 
Northern and Southern European examples. Issues of historical context and theoretical interpre- 
tation will be emphasized. 

350. Nineteenth Century. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. European and American art from the late 18th 
through 1900. Issues of theory, historical context and literary foundation will be considered. 

351 . Modern. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. The revolutionary experience of modern art, from its foun- 
dation in 19th century European movements through the 1950's. Critical theory and historical 
context will be stressed. 

352. American. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. The arts in the United States from the Colonial era to 
1 960. Emphasis placed upon factors which define American art and the critical foundations for the 
works. 

353. Contemporary. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Exploration of the various artistic movements from 
World War II to the present. Emphasis will be given to the change from modern to postmodern. 
Familiarity with images and critical texts will be expected. 

354. Art Theory. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Examination of the development and tradition of the 
literature of Western art theory and its relationship to artistic practice. 

355. Women in Art. I, I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Examination of the art of female artists and of women 
as subjects in art. An historical view with concentration on 20th century work. Critical theories will 
be emphasized. 

356. Twentieth Century Architecture. S. 3 HR. PR: Consent. History of 20th Century architecture 
focuses on development of the International Style and recent challenges to this modernist aes- 
thetic. 

365. Graduate Art Education Studies. I, II, S. 1-12 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. 
Studies in art education and related areas. The development of a master's degree project in 
conjunction with a faculty committee. 

400. Graduate Exhibition/Thesis. I, II, S. 3-6 HR. PR: Consent. Graduate Exhibition and Thesis. 
Research will be directed towards the production of a solo exhibition and a written thesis which 
documents the processes and philosophical principles of the artwork. 

401. Art History Thesis. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Topic selected by student in consultation with 
art history faculty. Research must indicate familiarity with primary and secondary sources and 
regard for evidence of art historical research, methodology, and criticism. 

402. Master's in Art Education Project. I, II, S. 3-9 HR. PR: Consent. This course is for the final 
three hours of the master's project. The in-depth project is to be completed and then approved 
and signed by the advising committee. 

490. Teaching Practicum/Professional Practice. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practices in 
college teaching. This course is designed to develop aspects of college teaching experience such 
as writing a syllabus, organizing a classroom, or improvising with materials or topical issues. 

496. Graduate Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. PR: Consent. Issues in Contemporary Art. The focus of this 
seminar is on analysis of theoretical issues and trends in contemporary art criticism. Emphasis is 
on comparative media, interdisciplinary forms of expression, and significant cultural concerns 
that affect of visual arts practice. 



Art 233 



Music 

Virginia Thompson, Graduate Advisor, Division of Music 

416-A Creative Arts Center 

Degrees Offered: Master of Music, Doctor of Musical Arts, Doctor of Philosophy 

The Division of Music is an accredited institutional member of the National Association 
of Schools of Music, the only nationally recognized accrediting agency for professional 
music instruction. All programs comply with the objectives and guidelines required by 
this organization. 

Prospective graduate students in music are required to have completed the appropri- 
ate curriculum of undergraduate study in music at WVU or its equivalent at another insti- 
tution of recognized standing. For acceptance into a degree program the applicant should 
make inquiry to the Director of Graduate Studies, Division of Music, P.O. Box 6111, 
Morgantown, WV 26506-6111. 

Applicants accepted for degree study must take diagnostic tests in music theory and 
music history, and must audition on piano. In addition, performance majors take diagnos- 
tic tests in pedagogy and literature. The results of these tests may indicate the need for 
remedial study, which must be completed before admission to candidacy. 

Master of Music 

The degree of master of music may be taken in performance, music education, com- 
position, music theory, or music history. Performance majors may specialize in piano, 
piano pedagogy, organ, voice, percussion, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, 
horn, trumpet, trombone, tuba, violin, viola, cello, double bass, guitar, or conducting. 

Admission Applicants to the program leading to the degree of Master of Music must 
present necessary credentials for evaluation of previous training and experience to the 
Division of Music. These include scores on the Graduate Record Examination General 
Aptitude Test (required only for music theory or music history applicants) and under- 
graduate transcripts showing an average of at least 3.0 grade-point average in all un- 
dergraduate study, submitted through the WVU Office of Admissions and Records. Three 
letters of recommendation from individuals qualified to judge the applicant's potential 
success as a graduate student in music must be submitted directly to the Director of 
Graduate Studies in Music. 

Applicants are also required to demonstrate, by audition or tape recording, the level 
of attainment in a principal performance area, which is a prerequisite to the curriculum 
sought. The evaluation of performance proficiency is based on technical ability, reper- 
toire, and musicianship. A listing of representative material for each performance area, 
graded by proficiency level, is available upon request. The audition for acceptance as a 
degree student, when required, is assessed for general admission purposes. For per- 
formance majors, the estimated proficiency level must be confirmed by a jury examina- 
tion at the end of the first semester of performance study. Credit in performance may be 
counted toward degree requirements only after the proficiency level prerequisite has 
been reached. 

Applicants seeking admission as composition majors must submit representative com- 
positions for evaluation and approval. 

Applicants seeking admission as music education, theory, or history majors must 
submit a sample of writing, such as a term paper: a musical subject is recommended, 
but not required. 

Applicants to music education curricula (with the exception of the certification option) 
must also submit a videotape of teaching, preferably of a K-12 music class. 



234 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Provisional Admission 

Applicants whose averages and test scores do not meet the qualifications outlined 
above may be considered for acceptance as provisional or non-degree students. If, upon 
completion of up to 1 2 semester hours of graduate study, they have achieved a minimum 
of a B (3.0) average, and after any previous undergraduate deficiencies or other condi- 
tions have been satisfied, such students may be accepted as degree students. 

Music Education Options 

Students majoring in music education will be allowed one of four options, to be deter- 
mined in consultation with the program consultant: 

• Thesis option; 

• Recital option (if the candidate demonstrates proficiency level 8 in the major perfor- 
mance area within the first 12 hours of enrollment); 

• Thirty-six hour course work option; and 

• Certification option (intended for persons possessing a bachelor's degree with a 
major in music other than music education), leading to eligibility for certification for 
teaching grades K-12 in the public schools of West Virginia. 

For the first three options, the following requirements apply: 

• Thirty graduate hours for thesis and recital options, 36 graduate hours otherwise, 
with a minimum average of 3.0. 

• For the thesis or 36-hour options, four hours of performance, either MUSC 400 
(principal performance area) or MUSC 310 (secondary performance area.) 

• Demonstration of the ability to integrate music history, music theory, and music edu- 
cation by passing a comprehensive oral examination. 

• Successful completion of a four-credit thesis or two-credit recital for the thesis and 
recital options, respectively. 

For the certification option, a combination of graduate and undergraduate courses will be 
selected to satisfy certification requirements. The 36 graduate hours include 12 hours of 
graduate music education courses and electives chosen to provide a good background for 
teaching. Undergraduate courses may be necessary to make up deficiencies. 

Requirements 
History of Music 

PR: Level 7 in the major performance area; Level 4 in piano; four semesters of a foreign 
language; seven hours upper-division theory; 15 undergraduate hours in music history. 

MUSC 430 Introduction to Music Bibliography 3 Hr. 

Music History, chosen from MUSC 221-227 6 Hr. 

MUSC 491 Special Topics 6 Hr. 

Theory Elective 3 Hr. 

MUSC 497 Research (Thesis) 4 Hr. 

Electives (at least four credits in music) 8 Hr. 

Total 30 Hr. 

Music Education 
PR: Level 2 in piano. 

Music Education courses at the 300 or 400 level* 12 Hr. 

One theory course and one music history course 5-6 Hr. 

For Thesis Option: 

MUSC 400 and/or 310 Performance 4 Hr. 

MUSC 497 Research (Thesis) 4 Hr. 

Electives 4-5 Hr. 



Music 235 



For Recital Option: 

MUSC 398 Master's Recital 2 Hr. 

MUSC 400 Performance (major performance area) 6 Hr. 

Electives 4-5 Hr. 

For 36-hour Option: 

MUSC 400 and/or 310 Performance 4 Hr. 

Electives 14-1 5 Hr. 

Totals 30 or 36 Hr. 

*Students in the thesis option must include MUSC 446. 

Performance 

PR: Level 10 in the major performance area, and Level 3 in piano; for organists, Level 5 

in piano; for pianists in the piano pedagogy option, Level 9 in piano and one year of piano 

pedagogy/group or equivalent teaching experience; for voice majors, the same language 

requirements as for the B.M. degree. 

MUSC 400 Performance (major performance area) 8 Hr. 

MUSC 430 Introduction to Music Bibliography 3 Hr. 

For Traditional Performance Option: 

MUSC 398 Master's Recital 4 Hr. 

One of the following 2 Hr. 

MUSC 398 Master's Recital 

MUSC 431 Research Problems for Performers 

One theory course and one music history course 

(chosen from Music 221-227) 5-6 Hr. 

Music electives 

(no more than four hours in the major performance area) 7-8 Hr. 

Total 30 Hr. 

For Piano Pedagogy Option: 

MUSC 398 Master's Recital 2 Hr. 

MUSC 312 Studies in Keyboard Performance and Pedagogy 6 Hr. 

MUSC 392 Guided Studies (Teaching internship) 4 Hr. 

One theory course or one music history course 2-3 Hr. 

Music electives 4-5 Hr. 

Total 30 Hr. 

For Conducting Option: 

MUSC 398 Master's Recital 6 Hr. 

MUSC 410, 411 Conducting Seminars 6 Hr. 

MUSC 333, 334, or 335 Studies in Vocal/Instrumental Music 3 Hr. 

MUSC 440 or 442 Studies in Choral/Instrumental Techniques 2 Hr. 

MUSC 467 Analytical Techniques 3 Hr. 

MUSC History/Theory Electives 2 Hr. 

Total 33 Hr. 

Composition 

PR: Level 8 in the major performance area; Level 4 in piano; evaluation of previously 
completed compositions at a graduate major level. 

MUSC 430 Introduction to Music Bibliography 3 Hr. 

MUSC 460 Composition 6 Hr. 

MUSC 475 Pedagogy of Theory 3 Hr. 

MUSC 470 Transcription and Arranging 3 Hr. 

MUSC 468 Compositional Tech. in Contemporary Music or 
MUSC 483 Theory Topics 3 Hr. 

MUSC 497 Research (Thesis) 4 Hr. 

21 Hrs. 

236 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Music electives (must include two of the following: 9 Hr. 

MUSC 460 Composition (Electronic Music) 

MUSC 467 Analytical Techniques 

A Muse History or Literature Course 

Total 30 Hr. 

Theory 

PR: Level 8 in the major performance area; Level 4 in piano. 

Music 430 Introduction to Music Bibliography 3 Hr. 

Graduate music history 3 Hr. 

MUSC 467 Analytical Techniques 3 Hr. 

MUSC 468 Compositional Techniques in Contemporary Music 3 Hr. 

MUSC 475 Pedagogy of Theory 3 Hr. 

MUSC 483 Theory Topics 3 Hr. 

MUSC 497 Research (Thesis) 4 Hr. 

Electives (at least four credits in music) 8 Hr. 

Total 30 Hr. 

Additional Requirements 

Master's degree students must establish an overall grade-point average of 3.0. 

A representative public recital is required of candidates majoring in performance. Com- 
position majors must submit as a thesis a composition in a large form. All candidates for 
the master of music degree are required to participate for credit for two semesters (or 
summer sessions) in a performing group which meets at least two clock hours per week 
and which is selected with the advisor's approval. 

A general comprehensive oral examination must be passed by all candidates for the 
master of music degree. Unsuccessful candidates may repeat this examination after a 
three-month period. The results of the second oral examination will normally be consid- 
ered final. The examining committee will decide immediately after an unsuccessful 
second attempt whether a petition for a third attempt will be granted. 

Students must complete their programs in eight calendar years. Failure to do so will 
result in the loss of credit for courses taken at the outset of the program. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The doctor of philosophy curriculum in music education prepares students for careers 
as teachers in higher education. Acceptance into the doctoral program is competitive. 
Applicants to the program leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must present 
necessary credentials for evaluation of previous training and experience to the Division 
of Music. These include transcripts showing an average of at least a 3.0 grade-point 
average in a minimum of 28 hours in liberal arts studies, submitted through the WVU 
Office of Admissions and Records. A sample of writing (such as a term paper), a video- 
tape of teaching (preferably of a K-1 2 music class), and three letters of recommendation 
from individuals qualified to judge the applicant's potential success as a graduate stu- 
dent in music must be submitted directly to the Director of Graduate Studies in Music. 
Normally, the admission process also includes an on-campus interview with the Music 
Education faculty, which may include an audition demonstrating proficiency in the 
applicant's major performance area. Applicants who do not meet all of the criteria for 
regular admission to the Ph.D. degree program may be granted a provisional admission 
subject to the satisfactory completion of certain specified courses or the attainment of a 
specified grade-point average within a semester's work. 



Music 237 



Course Work The exact amount and nature of course work undertaken will be deter- 
mined by the advisor with the approval of the student's doctoral committee in light of 
previous preparation and field of specialization. The student is expected to take Music 
494 Graduate Seminar as required by the field of specialization. Whatever preparatory 
courses (languages, statistics, bibliography, etc.) are needed must necessarily be taken 
early in the course of study. A paradigm of recommended courses and other require- 
ments is available upon request. 

Candidacy Upon completion of the requirements of the Division of Music and the gen- 
eral WVU graduate studies requirements, the student will be recommended for admis- 
sion to candidacy for the degree. These requirements are (in order of occurrence): 

1 . Demonstrate a satisfactory reading knowledge of German or French or satisfac- 
torily complete Statistics 311-312. Upon recommendation of the advisor, a different 
romance language may be substituted for French. 

2. Pass written qualifying examinations satisfactorily to show: 

a. Broad knowledge in theory and in music history and literature. 

b. Appropriate knowledge in the minor field. 

c. Knowledge in depth in the field of specialization. 

3. Pass satisfactorily a comprehensive oral qualifying examination. 

4. Present and have accepted an outline and prospectus of the dissertation. 

The requirement for doctoral seminars must be completed before the presentation of 
the prospectus. Graduate students who have met these requirements and who have 
maintained a minimum average of B (3.0) in courses completed shall be admitted to 
candidacy. The qualifying examinations shall be considered as one integral examination 
consisting of the written and oral parts. If the first attempt is unsuccessful, the student is 
allowed to try the entire examination a second time. The second attempt will be consid- 
ered final. The applicant's committee may elect to discourage a second attempt if the first 
does not indicate probable success upon repetition. 

Residence Requirements Completion of the requirements for this degree normally re- 
quires at least three years of full-time graduate work. A minimum of two consecutive 
semesters must be spent in residence in full-time graduate study at WVU beyond the 
master's degree or its equivalent. 

Dissertation The candidate must submit a dissertation produced at WVU under the 
direction of a major professor which demonstrates a high order of independent scholar- 
ship, originality, and competence in research, and which makes an original contribution 
to the field of specialization. 

After the dissertation has been approved and all other requirements have been fulfilled, 
the candidate's doctoral committee will administer the final oral examination. However, a 
final examination will not be given in the same semester as the qualifying examination. At 
the option of the student's committee, a final written examination may also be required. The 
final examination(s) shall be concerned with the dissertation, its contribution to knowledge, 
its relation to other fields, and the candidate's grasp of the field of specialization. 
Time Limitation Following admission to candidacy, doctoral students are allowed five 
years to complete all remaining degree requirements. An extension of time may be per- 
mitted only upon repetition of the qualifying examination and completion of any other 
requirements specified by the student's doctoral committee. 



238 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Doctor of Musical Arts 

The degree of doctor of musical arts may be taken in performance and literature (with 
specialization in piano, organ, voice, percussion, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, 
trumpet, trombone, tuba, violin, viola, cello, or double bass) or in composition. The pri- 
mary objective is professional competence at the highest level. Historical and theoretical 
knowledge sufficient to support individualized interpretations for performers and original 
creative work for composers is also expected. Writing and speaking skills needed to 
communicate clearly and effectively are required. To assist the student in achieving these 
objectives, the course of study includes requirements in performance or composition, 
academic course work, and research. 

Admission Acceptance into doctoral programs is competitive. Applicants to the program 
leading to the D.M.A. must present necessary credentials for evaluation of previous training 
and experience. These include transcripts showing an average of at least a 3.0 grade- 
point average in a minimum of 28 hours in liberal arts studies, submitted through the 
WVU Office of Admissions and Records. Copies of programs of recent major recitals, 
and three letters of recommendation from individuals qualified to judge the applicant's 
potential success as a graduate student in music must be submitted directly to the Direc- 
tor of Graduate Studies in Music. Normally, the admission process also includes an on- 
campus audition and interview with the faculty of the major performance area. Applicants 
to the D.M.A. in Composition must also submit scores and recordings for review. Appli- 
cants who do not meet all of the criteria for regular admission to the D.M.A. degree 
program may be granted a provisional admission subject to the satisfactory completion 
of certain specified courses or the attainment of a specified grade-point average within a 
semester's work. 

Curriculum The exact amount and nature of course work undertaken will be deter- 
mined by the student's advisor with the approval of the doctoral committee in light of 
previous preparation and field of specialization. A paradigm detailing recommended 
courses and other requirements is available upon request. 

Candidacy Upon completion of the requirements of the Division of Music and the gen- 
eral WVU graduate studies requirements, the student will be recommended for admis- 
sion to candidacy for the degree. These requirements are (in order of occurrence): 

1. Demonstrate reading proficiency in a foreign language by successful completion 
either of an examination administered by the Division of Music or the equivalent of 
the fourth semester of recent language study with a minimum grade of B. The lan- 
guage must be of recognized world significance and appropriate to the student's 
field of concentration. 

2. Pass written qualifying examinations satisfactorily to show: 

a. Broad knowledge in theory and music history and literature. 

b. Knowledge in depth of the literature of the field of specialization or of the craft 
of composition. 

3. Pass satisfactorily a comprehensive oral qualifying examination. 

Graduate students who have met these requirements and who have maintained a 
minimum average of B (3.0) in courses completed shall be admitted to candidacy. The 
qualifying examinations shall be considered one integral examination consisting of writ- 
ten and oral parts. If the first attempt is unsuccessful, the student is allowed to try the 
entire examination a second time. The second attempt will be considered final. The 
applicant's committee may elect to discourage a second attempt if the first does not 
indicate probable success upon repetition. 



Music 239 



Residence Requirements Completion of the requirements for this degree normally 
requires at least three years of full-time graduate work. A minimum of two consecutive 
semesters must be spent in residence in full-time graduate study at WVU beyond the 
master's degree or its equivalent. 

Performance Requirements Performance requirements (for performance majors) 
include private lessons, master classes in applied repertory, and public performance of 
at least two solo recitals and other types of presentations appropriate for the preparation 
of an artist-teacher, such as chamber music programs, concerto performances, major 
roles in opera or oratorio, or major accompaniments. Credit for each public performance 
is established in advance by the student's committee. Performances will be prepared 
under the direction of a WVU regular graduate faculty member. 
Composition Requirements Composition requirements (for composition majors) 
include private lessons and the creation of a composition portfolio. Credit for each com- 
position is established by the student's committee prior to its completion; it will be subse- 
quently evaluated on a pass-fail basis. Ten credits of the composition portfolio must be 
completed before admission to candidacy. Work on the major project may commence 
only after admission to candidacy. 

Academic course requirements include courses in music history and theory, and, for 
performers, an appropriate course in the literature of the major performance area. 
Research Requirements Research requirements are intended to develop theoretical 
and historical investigative techniques sufficient to enable the performer to form valid 
individualized interpretations and to assist the composer in developing an original style. 
These requirements consist of the course Introduction to Music Bibliography (MUSC 
430), demonstration of reading proficiency in a foreign language of major importance, for 
composers a doctoral seminar, and for all students a research project culminating in an 
extended written study related to the student's area, although not necessarily constitut- 
ing original research. This project will be supervised by a regular graduate faculty mem- 
ber who is a member of the student's doctoral committee in consultation with the entire 
doctoral committee. 

Final Examination For performers, the final examination will consist of a major solo 
recital (which will be regarded as the equivalent of the Ph.D. dissertation defense). Im- 
mediately following the public performance the candidate's committee will meet to evalu- 
ate the performance as evidence of mature musicianship and finished technique. The 
final recital will not occur in the same semester as the qualifying examination. 

For composers, when all compositions and the major project have been approved and 
all other requirements have been fulfilled, the candidate's doctoral committee will admin- 
ister the final oral examination. At the option of the committee, a written examination may 
also be required. The final examination(s) shall be concerned with the compositions, the 
major project, and the candidate's grasp of the field of specialization and its relation to 
other fields. The final examination will not be given in the same semester as the qualify- 
ing examination. 

Time Limitation Following admission to candidacy, doctoral students are allowed five 
years to complete all remaining degree requirements. An extension of time may be per- 
mitted only upon repetition of the qualifying examination and completion of any other 
requirements specified by the student's doctoral committee. 

Music (MUSC) 

200. Directed Music Studies. I, II, S. 1-4 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. Studies 
in performance, music education, music theory, music history, composition; includes directed or 
independent study in special topics. 



240 WVU Graduate Catalog 



210. Piano Class Methods and Materials. I. 3 HR. Methods, materials, and pedagogical techniques, 
including presentation of keyboard theory as used in functional piano. Practical organization of piano 
classes. Laboratory: Observation of experienced class teacher and student teaching. 

212. History of Keyboard Pedagogy and Technique. II. 3 HR. Study of keyboard development and 
technique, including pedagogical works of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries and appli- 
cation to specific teaching problems. Laboratory: Student teaching and observation, emphasizing 
analysis and solution of technical problems. 

213. Introduction to Jazz Improvisation. I. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 63, 64 and Proficiency Level 4. Devel- 
opment of improvisatory skills in the jazz idiom using melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic motives 
and patterns, and the application of knowledge of tonal centers, chord progressions, and junc- 
tions. 

214. Advanced Jazz Improvisation. II. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 213 or consent. Continuation of MUSC 
21 3. Analysis of chord progressions with emphasis on chord substitutions, turnbacks, and scales. 
Development of jazz repertoire through performance. 

216. Methods and Pedagogy. I. 0-2 HR. PR: MUSC 110; Junior standing, or Consent. 

217. Methods and Pedagogy. II. 1-2 HR. PR: MUSC 216. 

218. Repertoire. I. 0-2 HR. 

219. Repertoire. II. 0-2 HR. 

221. Music Before 1500. I, II, or S. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 33-34 or consent. A study of sacred and 
secular monophony, Notre Dame organa, thirteenth-century motet and conductus, and fourteenth 
and fifteenth-century polyphony in France and Italy. 

222. Music of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. I, II, or S. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 33-34 or 
consent. A study of styles and forms from the High Renaissance to the late Baroque. 

223. Music of the Eighteenth Century. I, II, or S. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 33-34 or consent. A study of 
styles and forms of the late Baroque through the Classic period. 

224. Music of the Nineteenth Century. I, II, or S. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 33-34 or consent. A study of 
styles, forms, and theoretical concepts illustrative of nineteenth-century music. 

225. Music of the Twentieth Century. I, II, or S. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 33-34 or consent. A study of 
stylistic trends during the twentieth century. 

226. History of Jazz. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 33-34. History and repertory of jazz from its Afro-American 
origins to 1 975 with attention to its major exponents (including Joplin, Armstrong, B. Smith, Morton, 
Ellington, Gillespie, Parker, Davis, and Coltrane) and its evolving style. 

227. Women in Music. I. (Alternate Years.) 3 HR. PR: MUSC 33 and 34; or consent. Critical 
examination of female musicians and their range of musical styles including composers, reper- 
toire, performers, etc., from Medieval period through today; feminist methodology includes re- 
examination of history and gender theory. (Travel expense possible; see current syllabus.) 

230. Music of Africa. 3 HR. Traditional music of selected areas of Africa south of the Sahara with 
particular reference to East Africa. The diverse musical cultures with emphasis on historical back- 
ground, instruments, ensembles, forms, styles, and music in its social context. 

243. Music Workshops. I, II, S. 1-2 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) 

245. Marching Band Techniques. 2 HR. 

248. Music Arranging for Public School Groups. I, II. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 66. Practical experience in 
techniques of making simple, workable arrangements of music for public school choral and instru- 
mental performance groups. 

260. Upper-Division Composition. I, II. 2 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Two semesters 
MUSC 160, or consent based on scores submitted. Creative writing with emphasis on practical 
composition for performance. 



Music 241 



263. Counterpoint. I. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 68 or consent. Sixteenth century counterpoint. 

264. Counterpoint. II. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 68 or consent. Eighteenth century counterpoint. 

265. Analysis of 18th-19th Century Music. II. (Alt yrs) 3 HR. PR: MUSC 68 or by permission of 
instructor. Detailed study of the materials and structure of European music of the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries. 

267. Electronic Music I. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 68 or consent. Technology of producing electronic 
music. Methods of producing electronic compositions, relationship between sound signal and 
sound perceived, ear training, analysis of examples from electronic music literature, and compo- 
sition of electronic music. 

268. Electronic Music. II. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 267. Continuation of MUSC 267. 

269. Analysis of 20th-century Art Music. II. (Alt. yrs.) 3 HR. Detailed study of the materials and 
structure of Western art music of the twentieth century. 

273. Arranging for Small Jazz Ensemble. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 171, and MUSC 173. Emphasis on 
small ensembles comprising three to nine players. 

274. Arranging for Large Jazz Ensemble. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 273 or consent. Continuation of MUSC 
273, with emphasis on arranging for big band and studio jazz ensemble. 

275. Jazz Harmony. II. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 68 and MUSC 21 3 and MUSC 214 or consent. Advanced 
jazz theory and harmony. Ear training, keyboard skills, chord voicing, and substitutions. 

310. Secondary Performance. I, II, S. 1 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Group or individual 
instruction in performance on a minor instrument (or voice), with emphasis on methods and mate- 
rials for school music teachers. 

312. Keyboard Performance and Pedagogy. I, II. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) (Offered in 
one-credit modules of which students may take one or more each semester.) Pedagogy, reper- 
toire, interpretation, and other topics which will enhance preparation of private piano teachers. 

333. Survey of Orchestral Music. 3 HR. PR: 6 hr upper-division music history or consent. Survey 
analysis of orchestral music from the late Baroque period to the present from the perspective of 
the conductor. 

334. Survey of Wind Music. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. of upper-division music history or consent. Survey 
and analysis of wind music from the late Baroque period to the present from the perspective of the 
conductor. 

335. Survey of Vocal Music. I. 3 HR. PR: 6 HR. upper-division music history. Survey of masses, 
oratorios, cantatas, and opera from late Renaissance to the twentieth century. Solo repertoire will 
not be included. 

341 . Music In The Elem School. 3 HR. 

343. Contemporary Techniques in Classroom Music. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 1 52 or consent. Principles 
and practice of contemporary techniques in elementary and junior high school classroom music, 
including those of Orff and Kodaly. 

346. Music making in Middle school/Junior High. II. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 151, 152, equivalent or 
consent. Identification and sequencing of appropriate concepts and skills for general music class 
students. Selection and use of materials including popular music. Emphasis on student music- 
making activities. Evaluation procedures included. 

347. Music in Early Childhood. S. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 151, 152, or equivalent; or consent. Musical 
experiences for children three through ten years. Emphasis on intellectual, physical and social/ 
emotional needs, and characteristics of children. Materials and activities for developing music 
concepts, skills, and positive response. 

357. Instrumental Methods and materials. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 51 , 44, and 45. Methods, materials, 
and administration of K-12 instrumental music programs; sequential instruction; conceptual and 
skill development; aural and reading competencies in music. Bi-weekly lab. 3 HR. lee. 

242 WVU Graduate Catalog 



358. Choral Music Methods and Materials. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 49 and 51 . Methods, materials, and 
administration of choral music programs; sequential instruction; conceptual and skill develop- 
ment; teaching aural and reading competencies. Bi-weekly lab. (3 HR. lee.) 

359. General Music Methods and Materials. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 51 . Introduction to major pedagogi- 
cal approaches used in K-12 general music classrooms; examination and development of mate- 
rials and curricula; analysis of teaching and learning styles. Bi-weekly lab. 3 HR. lee. 

360. Chamber Music: Brass. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance in small 
brass ensembles. 

361. Chamber Music: Guitar. I. II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance in small 
guitar ensembles. 

362. Chamber Music: Jazz. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance in jazz en- 
sembles, instrumental or vocal. 

363. Chamber Music: Percussion. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance in 
percussion ensembles. 

364. Chamber Music: Percussion-Ethnic. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance 
in percussion ensembles emphasizing music from non-Western cultures. 

365. Chamber Music: Percussion-Gamelan. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Perfor- 
mance in Gamelan ensembles. 

366. Chamber Music: Percussion-Steel Band. I, II. 0-3 Hr (May be repeated for credit.) Perfor- 
mance in steel band ensembles. 

367. Chamber Music: Piano. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance in piano 4- 
hand chamber music or performance by pianists in other ensembles. 

368. Chamber Music: String. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance in small 
string ensembles. 

369. Chamber Music: Voice. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance in small 
vocal ensembles. 

370. Chamber Music: Woodwind. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance in wind 
quintet and small woodwind ensembles. 

371. Chamber Music: Other. I, II. 0-3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) Performance in small 
mixed ensembles. 

392. Guided Studies in Music. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. PR: Graduate standing and consent. Intensive individu- 
alized reading reported in group discussions. Course may be repeated as many times as necessary, 
in as many areas as needed; different sections (i.e. areas) may be pursued simultaneously. 

398. Master's Recital. I, II, S. 2-4 HR. PR: MUSC 299 (Senior Recital) or consent. May be re- 
peated for credit. Master's performance students shall be permitted to give a recital only after 
they pass a qualifying audition before a designated faculty committee at least six weeks before 
the recital is to be given. 

400. Performance. I, II. 1-4 HR. (Open to qualified students in any field in Performance. May be 
repeated.) Normally offered for two credits (one 30-minute lesson per week) or four credits (one 
60-minute) lesson per week. A student must demonstrate ability of grade-level 4 on an instrument 
to receive credit in MUSC 400 on that instrument. 

409. Master Class in Applied Repertoire. I, II. 2 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. De- 
signed to give coverage through performance of the literature of a specific D.M.A. Performance field. 

410. Conducting. S. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 53 or equivalent. Instrumental and choral conducting. 
Major works are prepared and conducted through the use of recordings and music organizations. 

411. Conducting Seminar. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 410. Instrumental and choral conducting of major 
works under the supervision of the conductor of a major ensemble. 

Music 243 



419. Opera Theatre. I, II. 0-4 HR. PR: MUSC 19 or consent. Continuation of Music 19. Perfor- 
mance of major roles and advanced production techniques. Qualified students will undertake 
production-direction projects under supervision. 

423. Keyboard Literature. S. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 218, 219. Intensive study of the literature for 
keyboard instruments and the history of the literature. 

424. Song Literature. S. 1-3 HR. PR: MUSC 218, 219. Intensive study of the Art Song and the 
Lied and the history of their development. 

425. Choral Literature. 3 HR. 

428. Aesthetics Of Music. 2 HR. 

429. Survey of Sacred Music. S. 4HR. PR: MUSC 33, 34 or equivalent. Study of music suitable to 
the liturgical year, including the historical background of the Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant 
liturgies. 

430. Introduction to Music Bibliography. I. 3 HR. Survey of music bibliography and research 
techniques. 

431. Research Problems for Performers. II. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 430. Discussion of problems of 
music literature, performance practice, history, and instruments; preparation of a research paper 
under individual supervision. 

432. Ethnic Percussion. II. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 119 and MUSC 218 and MUSC 219; graduate per- 
cussion majors only. Examination of selected music from regions such as Africa, Asia, and Latin 
America; focus on music, instruments, and performance techniques and practices; functions of 
percussion music in society. 

433. Seminar in Ethnic Music. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Open to graduate music majors only. Exami- 
nation of selected ethnic music from Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Focuses on the music, 
instruments, and performance techniques and practices of these regions, and how the music 
functions in society. 

440. Choral Techniques. II. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 151, 152 or equivalent. Advanced techniques and 
procedures involved in development of choral ensembles. 

442. Instrumental Techniques. I. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 151, 152, or equivalent. Advanced techniques 
and procedures involved in individual performance and instruction through lecture demonstra- 
tions by performance faculty. 

443. Historical Foundations of Music Education. 3 HR. Examination of the history of music educa- 
tion from classical antiquity to the present, with particular emphasis on practices in the United 
States; examination and application of historical research methods. 3 HR. lee. 

444. Music Education. II. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 151, 152, or equivalent. Survey and critical study of 
the total music education program. 

446. Introduction to Research in Music Education. I. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 151 , 152, or equivalent. Meth- 
ods and measures necessary for conduct and understanding of research in music education. 

460. Composition. I, II. 3 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Consent. Primarily for candidates 
for graduate degrees in theory or composition. 

467. Analytical Techniques. I, II, S. 3 HR. Analytical techniques and their application to scholar- 
ship and performance, with emphasis on pre-twentieth century styles. 

468. Compositional Techniques in Contemporary Music. I, II, S. 3 HR. Analysis of twentieth-century music. 

470. Transcription and Arranging. I, II. 2 HR. (May be repeated once for credit.) PR: MUSC 172 or 
equivalent. Major projects in scoring for orchestra, band, or wind ensemble. 

475. Pedagogy of Theory. I, II, S. 3 HR. PR: MUSC 68 or consent. Consideration of various 
approaches to the teaching of theory. 



244 WVU Graduate Catalog 



483. Theory Topics. I, II, S. 3 HR. (May be repeated for max. 8 HR. credit.) Various types of 
analytical and theoretical problems and approaches to their solutions. 

488. Doctoral Recital. I, II, S. 1-4 HR. PR: MUSC 398 (Master's Recital) or consent. Number of 
credits depends upon length and content of the program; it must be approved in advance by the 
student's doctoral committee. Acceptance of the recital will be at the discretion of the doctoral 
committee. 

489. Lecture Recital. I, II. 2 HR. PR: MUSC 430. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II. 1-6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. I, II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent, which in some cases may be contingent upon 
doctoral foreign language examination or a course in statistics. Intensive individualized reading 
reported in group discussions. Course may be repeated as many times as necessary, in as many 
areas as needed; several different sections (i.e. areas) may be pursued simultaneously. 

494. Special Seminar. I, II. 1-6 HR. (May be repeated for max. 8 HR. credit.) PR: Consent. Inten- 
sive individual investigation and preparation of research papers. Presented by the combined 
doctoral staff in music. 

496. Graduate Seminar. I, II. 1 HR. PR: Consent. 

497. Research. I, II. 1-15 HR. PR: MUSC 430 or consent. 

498. Thesis. I, II. 2-4 HR. PR: Consent. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. I, II. 1-6 HR. 



Theatre 

William J. Winsor, Chairperson 

307-A Creative Arts Center 

Degree Offered: Master of Fine Arts 

The Division of Theatre at WVU offers the master of fine arts as the terminal degree 
in theatre, with concentrations in acting and theatre design (scene, costume, and 
lighting). 

Admission 

Prospective candidates for the degree of master of fine arts in theatre must have a B. A. 
or B.F.A. degree or equivalent from an accredited institution. Ordinarily, a minimum of 
30 semester hours in theatre at the undergraduate level is expected to have been 
completed with a grade-point average of no less than 2.75, although students with an 
undergraduate grade-point average of 2.25-2.5 may be admitted with probationary 
status. 

Auditions 

Applicants must audition/interview. Applicants intending to specialize in acting must 
submit a complete resume of their acting experience, at least two letters of recommen- 
dation from acting coaches or directors, and must present an audition before at least one 
member of the acting faculty. Those intending to specialize in design must submit a 
complete portfolio of their work, a resume of their design experience, and at least two 
letters of recommendation from design instructors or directors. An interview with at least 
one member of the design faculty is also required. 



Theatre 245 



For further details regarding these requirements, address inquiries to: Chairperson, 
Division of Theatre, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6111, Morgantown, WV 26506-61 1 1 . 

Advanced Standing 

Students may be eligible for 1 8 hours of graduate transfer credit for advanced standing 
if they meet the regular requirements of graduate admission. Students admitted with 
advanced standing are required to be in residence at WVU for a minimum of two 
semesters and a summer session. The request for advanced standing should be made 
to the Division Chairperson at the time of application. 

Master of Fine Arts Degree Programs 

For the master of fine arts degree, students must complete requirements for one of the 
following two programs: 

Acting The acting option is a highly disciplined period of training that focuses on perfor- 
mance. Students will explore basic exercises leading to intensive scene work fully supple- 
mented by technique courses in voice, speech, and movement. The actor takes courses in 
various areas that are essential to his/her craft (theatre history, text analysis, criticism, etc.) 
in order to strengthen his/her background. However, the greatest part of time is centered in 
the studio work every afternoon from 1 :00 to 5:00 p.m. Each week, ten hours are spent on 
acting, four to six hours on voice and speech, and four to six hours on movement. 

Successful completion of the minimum number of required graduate hours in one of 
the two following programs: 

• Two academic years and one summer of graduate course and production work 
totaling 59 credit hours; 

• A performance thesis project; 

• Oral defense of the thesis project; 

• A successful evaluation following the completion of the first year; and 

• Overall 3.0 grade-point average. 

Design The design option is a three-year course of study for students seeking profes- 
sional preparation leading to the M.F.A. degree in scenic, costume, or lighting design. 

Studio design courses, together with practical laboratory exercises, progressively 
offer students challenges related to the expectations found in the commercial world. 

• Three academic years of graduate course and production work totaling 67 credit 
hours; 

• A production thesis or research design project; and successful oral defense. 

• A successful evaluation following the completion of the first and second years; and 

• Overall 3.0 grade-point average. 

M.F.A. in Acting Suggested Program 

Semester I 

THET 375 Acting 3 Hr. 

THET 351 Voice and Speech 2 Hr. 

THET 371 Movement 2 Hr. 

THET 491 Makeup 1 Hr. 

THET 331 Research 3 Hr. 

THET 200 Text Analysis 3 Hr. 

14 Hr. 



246 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Semester II 

THET 376 Acting 3 Hr. 

THET352 Voice and Speech 2 Hr. 

THET 372 Movement 2 Hr. 

THET 200 Text Analysis 3 Hr. 

THET 460 Theatre History 3 Hr. 

13 Hr. 
Semester III (Summer) 

THET 278 Repertory Theatre 9 Hr. 

Semester IV 

THET 353 Voice and Speech 2 Hr. 

THET 373 Movement , 2 Hr. 

THET 377 Acting 3 Hr. 

THET 386 Criticism 3 Hr. 

THET 400 Performance Thesis 3 Hr. 

13 Hr. 
Semester V 

THET 374 Movement 2 Hr. 

THET 354 Voice and Speech 2 Hr. 

THET 378 Acting 3 Hr. 

THET 400 Performance Thesis 3 Hr. 

10 Hr. 

TOTAL 59 Hr. 

M.F.A. Scene Design Suggested Program 

Semester I 

THET 220 Costume History & Design 3 Hr. 

THET 367 Scene Design 3 Hr. 

THET 361 Sceno-graphics 3 Hr. 

THET 331 Research Methods 3 Hr. 

12 Hr. 
Semester II 

THET 221 Costume History & Design 3 Hr. 

THET 225 Theat. Rigging Electricity 3 Hr. 

THET 3647 Scene Design 3 Hr. 

THET 379 Rehearsal & Performance 1 Hr. 

THET 262 Scene Painting 3 Hr. 

13 Hr. 
Semester III 

THET 367 Scene Design 3 Hr. 

THET 369 Lighting Design 3 Hr. 

THET 386 Dramatic Criticism 3 Hr. 

THET 379 Rehearsal & Performance 3 Hr. 

12 Hr. 
Semester IV 

THET 367 Scene Design 3 Hr. 

THET 369 Lighting Design 3 Hr. 

THET 379 Rehearsal & Performance 3 Hr. 

THET 395 Period Styles 3 Hr. 

12 Hr. 



Theatre 247 



Semester V 

THET 400 Thesis 3 Hr. 

THET379 Rehearsal & Performance 3 Hr. 

THET 334 Portfolio Preparation 3 Hr. 

9Hr. 
Semester VI 

THET 400 Thesis 3 Hr. 

THET 333 Sem. Production Research 3 Hr. 

Elective 3 Hr. 

9Hr. 

TOTAL 67 Hr. 

Similar curriculum tracks are offered in costume design and lighting design with course 
work specific to each discipline. 

Theatre (THET) 

200. Directed Theatre Studies. I, II. 1-12 HR. (May be repeated for max. 12 HR. credit.) PR: 
Consent. Studies in theatre history, performance, stage design and technology and theatre crafts. 
Subject matter and number of sections varies from semester to semester. 

201. Advanced Costume Construction. I, II. 3 HR. PR: THET 105. Study and practical application 
of costume construction techniques through development of flat-pattern/ drafting skills. Emphasis 
on use of research to interpret the costume rendering. Extensive hands-on experience with con- 
struction projects for Division productions. (May be repeated for a max. 6 HR. credit.) 

205. Stagecraft 2. II. 3 HR. PR: THET 100 and THET 161. Detailed study of scenery construction 
and technical theatre. Emphasis on research projects, advanced sceno-graphics and problem- 
solving techniques. Practical experience through work on productions. 

206. Stage Lighting Theory. I. 3 HR. PR: THET 107. Theory of stage lighting design through 
lecture/project work. Emphasis on use of photometric data, production of shop orders, computer- 
aided paperwork and hand-drafted light plots. Practical work on Division productions. 

210. Theatre Dance 1. 2 HR. 

211 . Theatre Dance 2. 2 HR. 

218. Period Style for the Theatre. II. 3 HR. Survey of architecture, painting, sculpture, ornamen- 
tation, and furniture from the Egyptian through contemporary periods as utilized in stage 
design. Lecture with slides and film, and project work. 

21 9. Stage Properties. 3 HR. PR: THET 1 00 and THET 1 05. Techniques and methods for design- 
ing and fabricating stage properties for theatrical production. Practical experience in the construc- 
tion of properties as class projects and/or for productions. 

220. Costume History 1. I. 3 HR. Detailed study of the history of clothing from ancient Egypt 
through the Renaissance as it relates to costume design for the stage. Practical experience in 
development and presentation of costume designs based on historical clothing. 

221 . Costume History 2. II. 3 HR. Detailed study of the history of clothing from Renaissance to the 
present as it relates to costume design for the stage. Practical experience in development and 
presentation of designs based on historical and contemporary clothing. 

223. Costume Crafts. II. 3 HR. PR: THET 105 and THET 201 Identification and application of the 
materials and techniques used in the fabrication of costume crafts. Emphasis on research and 
practical experience through hands-on project work. 

225. Advanced Technical Production. II. 3 HR. PR: THET 100. Study of advanced technical pro- 
cedures including rigging, welding, new materials and special effects. Emphasis on the practices 
and development of skills through projects. 

240. Musical Theatre Repertory. 2 HR. 
248 WVU Graduate Catalog 



242. Musical Theatre Literature. 3 HR. 

251. Advanced Vocal Techniques. I. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Concentration on vocal character de- 
mands for the stage. Dialect work. Individual tutorials. 

252. Advanced Vocal Techniques. II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Continuation of THET 251 . 

260. Theatre Performance and Rehearsal Laboratory. I, II. 1-3 HR. (May be repeated for max. 9 
HR. credit.) PR: Theatre major and consent. Participation is assigned theatre projects. Apprecia- 
tion of creativity and performance techniques in theatre. 

262. Scene Painting. II. 3 HR. PR: THET 267, THET 367. An introduction to the basic tools, 
materials, and techniques of scene painting for the stage. 

267. Scene Design. I, II. 3 HR. Experience in the design of scenic environments including 
conceptualization, drafting, rendering, and model building related to the development and pre- 
sentation of scenic design. (May be repeated for a max. 9 HR. credit.) 

268. Costume Design. I, II. 3 HR. PR: THET 220 and THET 221 . Experience in the design of stage 
costumes including conceptualization, characterization, and rendering techniques related to the 
development and presentation of costume design. (May be repeated for a max. 9 HR. credit.) 

269. Lighting Design. I, II. 3 HR. PR: THET 203. Experience in the design of stage lighting includ- 
ing conceptualization, drafting and rendering techniques related to the development and presen- 
tation of lighting design. (May be repeated for a max. 9 credit hours.) 

271. Advanced Stage Movement. I. 2 HR. PR: THET 172. Advanced study of movement tech- 
niques for character work. Period styles of movement. 

272. Advanced Stage Movement. II. 2 HR. PR: THET 271 . Cont. of work in THET 271 . 

275. Advanced Acting Studio. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Continuation of advanced exercise work and 
styles. Coordinated with rehearsal/performance. 

276. Advanced Acting Studio. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Continuation of the work in THET 275. 
Audition techniques. 

278. Repertory Theatre. 1-6 HR. (May be repeated for max. 12 HR. credit.) PR: Consent. Re- 
hearsal and performance techniques for producing plays in rotating repertory. Emphasis is on the 
creation of a synthesized company of performers, designers, and technicians. 

280. Advanced Directing. II. 3 HR. PR: THET 180 or consent. Emphasis on the work of the direc- 
tor as an integrating artist. High level of proficiency in the direction of a one-act play is required of 
all students enrolled. 

282. Creative Dramatics. I, II, S. 3 HR. Study and practice of creative drama for theatre education 
or classroom/curriculum use. Instructional methods for drama techniques and practical activities 
are stressed. 

284. Puppetry. I, II. 3 HR. Comprehensive study of puppetry as a theatrical form. Construction, 
manipulation, and production methods for adult and youth audiences are highlighted. 

290. Playwriting. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Development of basic playwriting techniques. Specific 
assignments explore characterization, dramatic event, dialogue, tension, compression. Emphasis on 
the student finding one's own voice, style, and courage to dramatize one's view of the world. 

291. Advanced Playwriting. II. 3 HR. PR: THET 290. Further exploration of dramatic technique, 
with emphasis on orchestrating the longer play. Also touches on script analysis of known dramatic 
texts and on practical problems of a playwriting career. 

295. Classic Theatre to 1650. I. 3 HR. A survey of theatre history, with emphasis on the develop- 
ment of performance conditions, from classical antiquity through the middle of the seventeenth 
century. 

296. Euro/American Theatre, 1650-1850. II. 3 HR. A survey of theatre history, with emphasis on 
the development of performance conditions, from the middle of the seventeenth century through 
the rise of realism in the 1840's. 

Theatre 249 



297. Modern Theatre, 1850-1940. I. 3 HR. A survey of theatre history, with emphasis on the 
development of performance conditions, from the middle of the nineteenth century to the out- 
break of World War II. 

298. Contemporary Theatre Since 1940. II. 3 HR. A survey of theatre history, with emphasis on 
the development of performance conditions, from World War II to the present. 

307. Sound Seminar. II. 3 HR. An exploration of sound design for the theatre with practical em- 
phasis on producing and recording sound effects. 

331 . Research Methods. I. 3 HR. Methods of production research for graduate students in acting 
and design, with particular emphasis on writing, library use, and manuscript preparation. 

333. Seminar in Production Research. II. 3 HR. PR: THET 331 and THET 367. Seminar approach 
to individual design projects with oral and written presentations of research materials. Intensive 
critique within class by faculty and peers. 

334. Professional Aspects of Design. I. 3 HR. PR: THET 367 and THET 368 and THET 369. An in- 
depth work in the packaging and presentation of the design portfolio, resume writing and job 
opportunities. Emphasis is placed on methods of making a successful transition from an aca- 
demic environment into the performance industry. 

351. Graduate Vocal Techniques. I. 2 HR. PR: Consent. In depth vocal work, with special care 
taken to address each actor's individual qualities, beginning with breath, alignment, and release 
of habitual tension. Open resonance and free articulation to support the actor's voice. 

352. Graduate Voice Techniques. II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Continue the work introduced in THET 
351 with text exploration. Introduce the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and structure. 

353. Advanced Graduate Vocal Techniques. I. 2 HR. Intensive vocal exploration with 
Shakespearean text, character choices, and dialect work. 

354. Advanced Graduate Vocal Techniques. II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Continuation of THET 353 
with emphasis on period style texts and voice-over skills. 

361. Graduate Sceno-Graphic Techniques. I. 3 HR. Advanced techniques in drafting in accor- 
dance with current graphic standards for stage design and technology. Refinement of technique 
and graphic style through projects and exercise. 

362. C.A.D.D. for the Stage. 3 HR. PR: THET 361 and THET 367 or consent. Advanced study of 
the graphic applications of computer assisted design and drafting for stage design through project 
work and exercises. 

367. Graduate Scene Design. I, II. 3 HR. (May be repeated for a maximum of 9 HR. credit.) 
Lecture/Studio; Intensive practical experience in the creation of the scenic environment. Empha- 
sis is placed on the conceptualization, drafting, rendering and model building techniques related 
to the development and presentation of scenic design. 

368. Graduate Costume Design. I, II. 3 HR. PR: THET 220 and THET 221 . (May be repeated for 
a maximum of 9 HR. credit) Lecture/Studio; Intensive practical experience in the design of stage 
costumes. Emphasis is placed on the conceptualization, characterization and rendering tech- 
niques related to the development and presentation of costume design. 

369. Graduate Lighting Design. I, II. 3 HR. PR: THET 203 or consent. (May be repeated for a max. 
9 HR. credit.) Lecture/Studio; Intensive practical experience of lighting design for the theatre. 
Emphasis is placed on conceptualization, drafting and rendering techniques related to the devel- 
opment presentation of lighting design. 

371. Graduate Stage Movement. I. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Development of awareness of the actors 
physical apparatus utilizing movement techniques and mask work to explore basic alignment, 
neutrality and breath/gesture principles. 

372. Graduate Stage Movement. II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Continuation of the work in THET 371 
through specific applications in project studies. 



250 WVU Graduate Catalog 



373. Advanced Graduate Stage Movement. I. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Advanced study of movement 
techniques for character work, including rhythms of basic language/ movement connections and 
period styles of movement. 

374. Advanced Graduate Stage Movement. II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Continuation of the work in 
THET 373 through specific applications in project studies. 

375. Graduate Acting Studio. I. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Foundation of the craft of acting including 
sensory elements and environment, personalization, communication, and conflict. Scene study 
with concentration on contemporary American realism and refinement of audition techniques. 

376. Graduate Acting Studio. II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Rehearsal and presentation of Realism and 
extended Realism projects utilizing plays which are ensemble in nature to explore and deepen 
the acting process. 

377. Advanced Graduate Acting Studio. I. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Acting Shakespeare — monologue 
and Scene Study, text, verse scansion and exercise work. 

378. Advanced Graduate Acting Studio. II. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Rehearsal and presentation of 
Style project (Shakespeare, Comedy of Manners, Shaw, etc); acting for the camera and the busi- 
ness of acting. 

379. Rehearsal and Performance. I. 3 HR. (May be repeated for max. 12 HR. credit.) PR: Con- 
sent. Participation in assigned performance projects. 

386. Dramatic Theory and Criticism. I. 3 HR. A survey of the major documents addressing the 
theories of drama and theatre from the ancient Greeks to the present. 

391 . Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

395. Period Style. I. 3 HR. (Alternate years). An in-depth exploration of architecture, costumes, 
customs, and ornamentation in period style for the theatre from Egyptian through Contemporary. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

400. Performance Thesis. I, II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Creative performance project. Requires the 
projection of a written record which traces the acting or design process as it develops during 
planning, rehearsal, and performance. 

460. Specialized Seminars. 3-9 HR. (May be repeated for max. 9 HR. credit.) PR: Consent. Se- 
lected fields of study in theatre. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491. Advanced Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced subjects which are 
not covered in regularly scheduled courses. Study may be independent or through specially sched- 
uled lectures. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. I, II. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. For graduate students not seeking 
course work credit but who wish to meet residence requirements, use University facilities, and 
participate in its academic and cultural programs. 



Theatre 251 



School of Dentistry 

Robert N. Horn brook, D.D.S., M.S.D., Interim Dean 
William R. McCutcheon, D.D.S., M.P.H., Associate Dean 
James E. Overberger, D.D.S., M.S., Associate Dean 
David T. Puderbaugh, D.D.S., Assistant Dean 
Frank H. Stevens, D.D.S., Assistant Dean 

The School of Dentistry was established by an act of the West Virginia Legislature on 
March 9, 1951 , and offers baccalaureate, professional, and advanced degrees. The school 
is located on the first floor of the Health Sciences Center North. Modern clinical facilities 
include over 140 treatment areas and new state-of-the-art clinical and preclinical simula- 
tion teaching laboratories. 

The majority of the faculty are full-time and have had advanced education in all of the 
recognized specialty areas. All programs are fully accredited by the Commission on 
Accreditation of the American Dental Association. The School will be expanding its spe- 
cialty and research areas as additional space and funds become available. 

The School of Dentistry offers several advanced education programs beyond the D.D.S. 
and B.S. degrees. 

The Department of Endodontics offers a program of advanced study and clinical train- 
ing leading to the master of science degree. The program requires a minimum of 24 
months (two academic years and two summers) of full-time residency in the School of 
Dentistry. The program is designed to qualify dentists for careers in endodontic clinical 
practice, teaching, and research. 

The Department of Orthodontics offers a program of advanced study and clinical train- 
ing leading to the master of science degree. The program requires a minimum of 34 
months (three academic years and two summers) of full-time residency in the School of 
Dentistry. The program is designed to qualify dentists for careers in orthodontic clinical 
practice, teaching, and research. 

The Department of Dental Hygiene offers a program of advanced study and special- 
ized training leading to the master of science degree. The program requires the comple- 
tion of a minimum of 36 semester hours through full- or part-time enrollment in the School 
of Dentistry. The program is designed to qualify dental hygienists for careers in teaching, 
administration, and management. 

The School of Dentistry offers one four-year residency in oral and maxillofacial sur- 
gery, eight one-year general practice residencies, and two one-year advanced education 
in general dentistry residencies. 

Graduates of both North American and international dental schools are considered for 
admission to the dental speciality programs. Graduate assistantships are available in the 
second year of the endodontic program and the third year of the orthodontic program. 
Stipends are provided for the residency programs. 

Information concerning admission requirements and courses of study may be 

obtained from the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic and Postdoctoral 

Affairs, WVU School of Dentistry, P.O. Box 9402, Health Sciences Center, 

Morgantown, WV 26506-9402. Telephone (304) 293-3549, fax (304) 293-2859, 

e-mail mpowley@wvuvphs1 .hsc.wvu.edu. 

Graduate Programs 

Dental Hygiene M.S. 

Dental Specialties M.S. 

Professional Degree 

Dentistry D.D.S. 

(Please see the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center Catalog.) 

252 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Graduate Faculty 

f Indicates regular membership in graduate faculty. 
* Indicates associate membership in graduate faculty. 

Professors 

Richard J. Crout, D.M.D., Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Periodontics. Drug therapy and pharmacology. 
t Christina B. DeBiase, Ed.D. (WVU). Dental hygiene, Curriculum and administration, Special 

patient care. 
f MarciaA. Gladwin, Ed.D. (U. Ky.). Dental hygiene, Dental materials, Ethics, Curriculum. 
*Robert W. Graves, D.D.S. (WVU). Chairperson. Oral and maxillofacial surgery, Pharmacy, Drug 

therapy and pharmacology. 
David M. Hickman, D.D.S. (WVU). Dental Practice Management, Orofacial pain, Restorative 

Dentistry. 
'Robert H. Hornbrook, D.D.S., M.S.D. (WVU). Periodontics, Treatment therapy. 
'Robert M. Howell, D.D.S., M.S.D. (MCV). Chairperson, Oral pathology. 
Elizabeth C. Kao, D.M.D. (U. Penn.). Restorative dentistry. 
Gordon G. Keyes, D.D.S., M.S., J.D. (U. MD.). Oral pathology, Legal aspects. 
*Barbara K. Komives-Norris, M.S. (Ohio St. U.). Director, Dental hygiene. Educational 

administration. 
William R. McCutcheon, D.D.S., M.P.H. (WVU). Associate Dean. Dental public health, Behavioral 

dentistry. 
r Peter W. Ngan, D.M.D. (Harvard). Chairperson. Orthodontics, Craniofacial growth and 

development, Appliance therapy. 
Barnes E. Overberger, D.D.S., M.S. (U. Pitt.). Associate Dean. Materials science, Prosthodontics. 
'Robert G. Pifer, D.D.S. (WVU). Chairperson. Oral radiology, Treatment planning. 
Norton P. Smith II, D.D.S. (WVU). Fixed prosthodontics, Computers. 
f Carol A. Spear, M.S. (U. Mich.). Dental hygiene related topics, Instrumentation, Infection control, 

Education. 
Robert N. Stuchell, D.M.D. (U. Pitt.). Preventive dentistry, Treatment therapy. 
Associate Professors 

tC. Russell Jackson, D.D.S., M.S. (WVU). Endodontics, Pulpal trauma. 
f Thomas F. Razmus, D.D.S., M.S. (U. Mich.) Radiology/imaging, Oral medicine, Oral diagnosis/ 

treatment planning. 
Assistant Professors 

Michael Arcuri, D.D.S. (MCV). Prosthodontics, Maxillofacial prosthodontics. 
r Michael D. Bagby, D.D.S., Ph.D. (Loyola). Biomaterials, Restorative dentistry. 
f K. Birgitta Brown, D.M.D. (Wash. U.). Operative dentistry, Geriatrics. 
Mark C. Durkee, D.D.S. (U. Maryland). Orthodontics, Biomechanics, Biomechanical engineering, 

Anatomy 
*Hera Kim, D.D.S., (N.Y.U.). Orthodontics, Orthodontic bracket strengths, Dental materials. 
Kavita Kohli, D.D.S. (U. Nebraska). Pediatric dentistry, Flourides. 

f Mark W. Richards, D.D.S., M.Ed. (U. Wash.). Chairperson. Prosthodontics, Implantology. 
Louise Tupta-Veselicky, D.D.S., M.Ed. (WVU). Periodontics, Treatment therapy. 
Jack S. Yorty, D.D.S. (WVU). General dentistry. 



School of Dentistry 253 



Dental Hygiene 

Barbara K. Komives-Norris, Director, Division of Dental Hygiene 
Christina B. DeBiase, Coordinator of the Graduate Program 
1073 Health Sciences North 
Degree Offered: Master of Science 

The School of Dentistry and its Division of Dental Hygiene offer a program of ad- 
vanced study leading to the degree of Master of Science. This program requires a mini- 
mum of 36 semester hours through full-time or part-time enrollment in the School of 
Dentistry. It is designed to qualify dental hygienists for careers in teaching, administra- 
tion, research and management. 

Options for concurrent master's degrees in the area of community medicine or public 
administration are also available. 

Application Deadlines 

Inquiries concerning this program should be directed to the Office of the Associate 
Dean for Academic and Postdoctoral Affairs, School of Dentistry. Applications should be 
filed by July 1 for fall admission and by November 1 for spring enrollment. 

Admission Requirements 

• A baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene from an accredited dental hygiene pro- 
gram or a baccalaureate degree in another field of study from an approved institu- 
tion of higher education while holding a certificate or associate's degree in dental 
hygiene from a program fully accredited by the American Dental Association 
Commission on Dental Accreditation 

• Evidence of scholastic and clinical achievement to indicate the applicant's ability to 
progress in a program of this nature. Generally, a minimum grade-point average of 
2.5 or above is required 

• Completion of one of these standardized tests: the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) general aptitude test with a score of 1 ,000 or above, or the Miller Analogies 
Test with a score of 50 or above 

• Submission of all information requested in the graduate application to the Office of 
the Associate Dean for Academic and Postdoctoral Affairs. 

Degree Requirements 

• Completion of a minimum of 36 semester credit hours: 21 required credit hours and 1 5 
credit hours in an elective area(s) of dental hygiene specialization. Four elective areas 
of specialization are offered. These areas include office management, special patients, 
education/administration, and basic sciences. The student may choose one or two of 
these areas of study. Courses within these specializations are taught by a number of 
schools or colleges within the University. An individualized program will be devised for 
each student which includes a maximum of six hours in research leading to an accept- 
able thesis. Oral defense of the thesis is required. 

GPA 

• Achievement of a 3.0 GPA or an overall academic average of at least a B in all 
work attempted in the master's program. A grade of C or below in two courses will 
require a faculty review of the student's progress. A third C will result in suspension 
from the program. 

• Removal of all conditions, deficiencies and incomplete grades. Credit hours for 
courses with a grade lower than C do not count toward degree requirements. 

254 WVU Graduate Catalog 



M.S. Curriculum 

ED P 311 Statistics 3 HR. 

ED P330 Test and Measurement 3 HR. 

DTHY 380 Critical Issues in Health Care 3 HR. 

DTHY 381 Expanded Functions 3 HR. 

DENT 391 Computer Applications in Dentistry. 2 HR. 

DENT 391 Research Methods 1 HR. 

DTHY 397 Research (Thesis) 6 HR. 

Total 21 HR. 

Elective Area(s) of Dental Hygiene Specialization 15 HR. 

Dental Hygiene 391 and Dentistry 391 courses and 

Courses taught by the School/College of: 

Business and Economics 

Human Resources and Education 

Medicine 

Multidisciplinary Studies 

Total 36 HR. 

Dental Hygiene (DTHY) 

380. Dental Hygiene Seminar and Practice 1. I. 3 HR. PR: Graduate standing and consent. Ex- 
amination of the critical environmental issues affecting the future of health care; particular impact 
on oral health care trends will form major focus. Dental hygiene clinical practice is also included. 

381 . Dental Hygiene Seminar and Practice 2. II. 3 HR. PR: DTHY 380. Expanded services for the 
dental hygienist with emphasis on restorative and periodontal functions.. 

391. Advanced Topics. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regu- 
larly scheduled courses. 

397. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities leading to a thesis, problem 
report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

Dentistry (DENT) 

391. Advanced Topics. (Fourth year.) I and II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced 
topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of 
dentistry. 



Endodontics 

C. Russell Jackson, D.D.S., M.S., Director 
1067 Health Sciences North 
Degree Offered: Master of Science 

The School of Dentistry and its Division of Endodontics offer a program of advanced 
study and clinical training leading to the degree of Master of Science. The program re- 
quires a minimum of 24 months (two academic years and two summer sessions) of full- 
time residency in the School of Dentistry and is designed to qualify dentists for careers in 
endodontic clinical practice, teaching, and research. 

Inquiries concerning this program should be directed to the Office of the Associate 
Dean for Academic and Postdoctoral Affairs. Applicants will be processed in the School 
of Dentistry. Applicants approved for admission to the program will be notified soon after 
December 1. 



Endodontics 255 



Admission Requirements 

The program's admission requirements are as follows: 

• Graduation from an accredited school of dentistry. 

• Evidence of scholastic and clinical achievement that would indicate the applicant's 
ability to progress in a program of this nature. 

Each applicant must file with the Department of Endodontics all information requested 
in the departmental application form by September 15. 

Program Requirements 

For the Master of Science degree, the following requirements must be met: 

• Fulfillment of University requirements for graduate study. 

• Twenty-four months (two academic years and two summer sessions) of consecutive 
residency at the WVU School of Dentistry. 

• An approved master's thesis based on original research completed during the per- 
iod of residency in an area related to endodontics. 

• Successful completion of a final oral examination. 

• Completion of a minimum of 63 credit hours, including 32 hours of endodontic courses, 
a minimum of 24 hours of selected basic sciences subjects, and a thesis (seven 
hours). 

• Demonstration of satisfactory clinical competency in the student's field. 

• Maintenance of a grade level commensurate with graduate education. 

Dentistry (DENT) 

391. Advanced Topics. (Fourth year.) I and II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced 
topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities 
leading to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

399. Clinic Completion Practicum. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. Supervised patient care in selected clinical 
areas specified for each individual student according to their clinical competency requirements. 

400. Advanced Oral Surgery. I, II, S. 1-12 HR. PR: Consent. Advanced study of therapeutics, 
hospital protocol, and surgical aspects of oral surgery involving lectures, seminars, demonstra- 
tions, and clinical applications. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of 
dentistry. 

491. Advanced Study. 1-6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 



256 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Endodontics (ENDO) 

389. Endodontic Theory. I, II, S. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Provides seminar discussions in the topics 
of: basic endodontic techniques, advanced endodontic techniques, endodontic literature review, 
case presentation, and advanced endodontic theory. 

390. Clinical Endodontics. I, II, S. 1-5 HR. (May be repeated for credit.) PR: Graduate of an 
accredited dental school and admission to the Advanced Education Program in Endodontics or 
consent. Clinical endodontic practice in the areas of: ordinary endodontic cases, complex endo- 
dontic cases, hemisection, root amputation, replantation, transplantation, endodontic implanta- 
tion, vital pulp therapy, apexification, and bleaching. 

391. Advanced Topics. (Fourth year.) I and II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced 
topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities 
leading to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of 
dentistry. 

Microbiology (MBIM) 

317. Special Problems in Microbiology. I, II, S. 1-7 HR. per sem. with a total of 24 HR. available. 

Pathogenic microorganisms, including immunology and antimicrobial agents. 

Pathology (PATH) 

382. Oral Histopathology. I, II. 1-2 HR. PR: PATH 338, 353, consent. Microscopic study of head 
and neck lesions. 

401 . Special Studies in Oral Pathology. 1,11.1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Advanced seminar or indepen- 
dent study of local and/or systemic disease processes affecting oral and facial structures. 

Pharmacology and Toxicology (PCOL) 

360. Pharmacology. I. 4 HR. PR: Dental student standing or consent. Lecture and demonstrations 
on pharmacologic actions and therapeutic uses of drugs. 

Statistics (STAT) 

311. Statistical Methods 1. 1, II. S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 3. Statistical models, distributions, probability, 
random variables, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, regression, correlation, transforma- 
tions, F and Chi-square distributions, analysis of variance and multiple comparisons. (Equiv. to 
ED. P. 311 and PSYC311.) 



Endodontics 257 



Orthodontics 

Peter Ngan, D.M.D., Chairperson 
1077 Health Sciences North 
Degree Offered: Master of Science 

The School of Dentistry and its Department of Orthodontics offer a program of ad- 
vanced study and clinical training leading to the degree of Master of Science. The pro- 
gram requires a minimum of 34 months (three academic years and two summers) of full- 
time residency in the School of Dentistry and is designed to qualify dentists for careers in 
orthodontic clinical practice, teaching, and research. 

Inquiries concerning this program should be directed to the Office of the Associate 
Dean for Academic and Postdoctoral Affairs. Applications will be processed in the School 
of Dentistry. Those applicants approved for admission to the program will be notified 
soon after December 1 . 

Admission Requirements 

• Graduation from an accredited dental school. 

• Evidence of scholastic and clinical achievement that would indicate the applicant's 
ability to progress in a program of this nature. Generally, a minimum grade-point 
average of 3.0 is required for admission. 

• Each applicant must file with the department all information requested in the depart- 
ment application form by September 15. 

• Fulfillment of WVU general requirements for graduate study. 

• Thirty-four months (three academic years and two summers) of consecutive resi- 
dency at the School of Dentistry. 

• An approved master's thesis based on original research completed during the per- 
iod of residency in an area related to orthodontics. 

• Satisfactory performance in a final oral examination. 

• Completion of a minimum of 74 credit hours, including 46 hours of orthodontic courses, 
a minimum of 15 hours of selected basic sciences subjects, and a research/thesis 
(13 hours). 

• Satisfactory demonstration of clinical competence in the student's field. 

• Maintenance of a grade level commensurate with graduate education. 

Anatomy (ANAT) 

316. Craniofacial Growth and Maturation. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent of instructor. The current con- 
cepts of craniofacial growth and maturation are presented and integrated for application to clinical 
problems. 

Orthodontics (ORTH) 

391. Advanced Topics. (Fourth year.) I and II. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced 
topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities 
leading to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

416. Biomechanics. I, II, S. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Design and function of the teeth and their sur- 
rounding structures, and response of these tissues to orthodontic procedures. 

417. Orthodontic Technique. I. II, S. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Laboratory course in techniques related 
to fabrication and manipulation of orthodontic appliances. 

418. Orthodontic Materials. I. II, S. 1 HR. PR: Consent. Physical properties of materials used in 
orthodontic appliances. 



258 WVU Graduate Catalog 



419. Orthodontic Diagnosis. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Seminar-type class on technique of 
patient examination, acquiring diagnostic records, and analyzing and correlating this information 
to the treatment of clinical problems. 

420. Cephalometrics. S. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Use of radiographic cephalometry in studying 
growth of the human face, analysis of dentofacial malformations, and evaluation of orthodontic 
treatment. 

421. Orthodontic Mechanics. I, II, S. 1-4 HR. PR: DENT 41 6, 417. Seminar and laboratory course 
on basic orthodontic mechanical properties. 

422. Advanced Orthodontic Mechanics. I, II, S. 1 HR. PR: ORTH 421 . Continuation of DENT 421 
involving more difficult type cases and introducing more sophisticated appliance therapy. 

423. Growth and Development. II 1-5 HR. PR: Consent. Seminar-type course on normal and 
abnormal growth of the human head and its application to orthodontics. 

425. Orthodontic Seminar. I, II, S. 1-8 HR. PR: Consent. Discussions including all branches of 
dental science, with special emphasis on the orthodontic interest. Assigned topics and articles in 
the literature discussed. 

426. Orthodontic Clinic. I, II, S. 1-12 HR. PR: DENT 416, 417. Clinical treatment of selected 
patients. 

490. Teaching Practicum. I, II. 1-3 HR. PR: Consent. Supervised practice in college teaching of 
dentistry. 

491. Advanced Study. 1-6 HR. 

492. Directed Study. 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

494. Special Seminars. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 

Pathology (PATH) 

397. Pediatric Oral Pathology I. 2 HR. PR: Consent. Lecture and seminar course on inherited 
diseases and other pathologic situations of oral cavity and face specific for pediatric age group. 

Statistics (STAT) 

311. Statistical Methods 1. 1, II. S. 3 HR. PR: MATH 3. Statistical models, distributions, probability, 
random variables, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, regression, correlation, transforma- 
tions, F and Chi-square distributions, analysis of variance and multiple comparisons. (Equiv. to 
ED. P. 311 andPSYC311.) 



Orthodontics 259 



College of Engineering and Mineral Resources 

Allen C. Cogley, Ph.D., Dean. Interim Associate Dean for Research & Graduate Studies 
Afzel Noore, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
Hoyce J. Watts, M.S., Associate Dean for Administration 
e-mail: cemr-info@cemr.wvu.edu 
web: www.cemr.wvu.edu/ 

Graduate Degrees Offered: 

Aerospace Engineering M.S.A.E., Ph.D. 

Chemical Engineering M.S. Ch.E., Ph.D. 

Civil Engineering M.S.C.E., Ph.D. 

Computer Engineering Ph.D. 

Computer Science M.S.C.S., Ph.D. 

Electrical Engineering M.S.E.E., Ph.D. 

Engineering M.S.E. 

Engineering of Mines M.S.E.M., Ph.D. 

Industrial Engineering M.S. I.E., Ph.D. 

Mechanical Engineering M.S.M.E., Ph.D. 

Occupational Hygiene and Occupational Safety M.S. 

Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering M.S.P.N.G.E., Ph.D. 

Safety Management M.S. 

Software Engineering M.S.S.E. 

College of Engineering and Mineral Resources (CEMR) graduate programs are 
administered through the Departments of Chemical Engineering, Civil and Environ- 
mental Engineering, Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Industrial and 
Management Systems Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 
Mining Engineering, Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, and Safety and 
Environmental Management. 

The facilities are housed on the Evansdale Campus in three buildings: the Engineering 
Sciences Building, the Mineral Resources Building, and the Engineering Research Build- 
ing. These buildings house state-of-the-art research facilities, well-equipped teaching labo- 
ratories, classrooms, and offices for the faculty and administration of the graduate 
programs and Extension and Outreach. 

The College offers a doctor of philosophy in most disciplines. The Ph.D. program 
prepares graduates for leadership in industrial, governmental, or academic fields. The 
areas of specialization in engineering are aerospace, chemical, civil, computer, electri- 
cal, environmental, industrial, mechanical, mining, and petroleum and natural gas 
engineering. In addition, the College offers the Ph.D. in Computer Science. 

Designated master's degrees are offered in aerospace, chemical, civil, electrical, indus- 
trial, mining, mechanical, petroleum and natural gas, software engineering, and computer 
science. A master of science in engineering (M.S.E.) degree is offered to qualified students 
as determined at the departmental level. Master of science degrees are offered in occupa- 
tional hygiene and occupational safety and in safety management. 

Currently the College offers a certificate in bioengineering, manufacturing systems 
engineering, materials engineering, and software engineering. 

For specific information about a program, students should contact the graduate 
program coordinator in the area of interest or the Associate Dean for Research and 
Graduate Studies at (304) 293-4821. 



260 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Special Requirements 

A student desiring to take courses for graduate credit in the college must comply with 
the appropriate University regulations for graduate study. To become enrolled in a CEMR 
graduate program, a student must apply for admission through the Office of 
Admissions and Records to the major department of the student's choice. Acceptance 
by the major department will depend upon review of the student's academic back- 
ground and available facilities in that department. 

An applicant with a baccalaureate degree, or its equivalent, from a program accred- 
ited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), Computer 
Science Accreditation Board (CSAB), or an internationally recognized program in engi- 
neering or computer science will be admitted on the same basis as engineering or 
computer science graduates of WVU. Lacking these qualifications, an applicant must 
first fulfill any special requirements of the department in which the student is seeking an 
advanced degree. 

No credits which are reported with a grade lower than C are acceptable toward an 
advanced degree. To qualify for an advanced degree, the graduate student must have 
a grade-point average of at least 3.0 based on all courses acceptable for graduate 
credit for which the student has received a grade from WVU. Graduate students in the 
College must also comply with the regulations of their major department. 

Individual departments may establish more stringent requirements than those adopted 
for CEMR as a whole. These departmental requirements are contained in the individual 
program sections of the graduate catalog. 

Course Load 

A full-time graduate student must register for at least nine, but no more than 15, 
credit hours during each regular semester, or at least six, but no more than 12, credit 
hours in the two summer sessions combined. Permission to carry a heavier load must 
be obtained in writing from the dean. 

Master's Program 

For all master's degree students, an advisory and examining committee consisting of 
at least three faculty members will be appointed. A plan of study must be jointly pre- 
pared and approved by the student and all members of the student's advisory and 
examining committee, the department chair, and the dean or dean's designate, either 
at the end of the second semester of the student's attendance or at the completion of 
the twelfth course credit hour, whichever is later. The plan must contain a minimum of 
30 semester credit hours, not more than nine of which can be at the 200 level. If a 
thesis or a problem report is part of the candidate's program, not more than six semes- 
ter credit hours of research leading to an acceptable thesis or more than three semes- 
ter credit hours of work for an acceptable problem report may be applied toward the 
credit hour requirement. 

Application for Transfer of Graduate Credit A student wishing to apply graduate 
credit earned at another institution to a master's degree at WVU must complete an 
Application for Transfer of Graduate Credit to WVUiorm and have an official transcript 
submitted to the WVU Office of Admissions and Records from the external institution. A 
maximum of 12 semester hours from other institutions may be acceptable for credit at 
WVU in master's degree programs in CEMR. Departmental programs may choose to 
accept fewer transfer credit hours. 

Time to Completion All requirements for the master's degree must be completed within 
eight years preceding the student's graduation. 

College of Engineering and Mineral Resources 261 



Doctor of Philosophy 

The academic units within the College that are approved for participation in the doc- 
tor of philosophy degree program are the Departments of Chemical Engineering, Civil 
and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Indus- 
trial and Management Systems Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 
Mining Engineering, and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering. 

Admission as a graduate student is required of all applicants for admission to a pro- 
gram of study and research leading to the Ph.D. degree. Applicants for admission must 
hold or expect to receive a bachelor's degree in engineering or computer science from 
an accredited or an internationally recognized program in engineering or computer sci- 
ence. Although a bachelor's degree is the minimum requirement, a master's degree in 
engineering or computer science is recommended for applicants. An applicant who 
holds a B.S. or M.S. in one of the physical sciences or mathematics may be considered 
for admission. Admission to graduate study does not necessarily assure entrance into 
a CEMR doctoral program. 

Application for Transfer of Graduate Credit A student wishing to apply credit earned 
at another institution to a doctoral degree program at WVU must submit the Application 
For Transfer of Graduate Credit to WVU form and have an official transcript from the 
institution forwarded to the WVU Office of Admissions and Records. The approval of 
transfer credit is at the discretion of the student's advisory and examining committee. 

Advisory Committee The student, research advisor, academic advisor, and depart- 
ment chairperson appoint the student's advisory and examining committee. For the 
Ph.D. program, each committee must consist of at least five members — at least three, 
including the chairperson, from the student's major department and one from another 
discipline related to the student's area of interest. 

Plan of Study At the end of the second semester of a student's attendance, at the 
completion of the twelfth credit hour, or when master's degree requirements are com- 
pleted, whichever is later, the student, with the advice and consent of the student's 
academic advisor, graduate coordinator, and members of the student's advisory and 
examining committee, will submit a plan of study, initiated in the student's department, 
to the dean or dean's designee. Some departments may require that a preliminary 
dissertation research proposal be submitted along with the plan of study. 

Candidacy Examination After admission to the program and after the residence re- 
quirement is met, the applicant will take a candidacy examination in which the student 
must demonstrate: (a) a grasp of the important phases and problems of the field of 
study and an appreciation of their relation to other fields of human knowledge and 
accomplishments and (b) the ability to employ the instruments of research developed 
in the student's area of interest. When an applicant has passed the comprehensive 
examination, the student will be formally admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree. 
A student will have only one opportunity for reexamination. 

Credit Requirements The doctor of philosophy degree is not awarded solely on the 
basis of the accumulation of course credits and completion of a definite residence 
requirement. The amount and nature of the course work undertaken by a doctoral stu- 
dent will be established for each individual student with the objective of ensuring a 
reasonable and coherent progression of academic development beyond the baccalau- 
reate and/or master's degree. 



262 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Residency Two semesters of full-time attendance at the Morgantown campus is re- 
quired, consisting of a minimum of nine credit hours each. A summer schedule, consist- 
ing of registration in both sessions and completion of a minimum of nine hours, is con- 
sidered equivalent to a one-semester residence. 

Dissertation The candidate must submit a dissertation on a topic within the area of his/ 
her major interest. The doctoral dissertation must represent the results of independent 
research, must show a high degree of originality and creativity on the part of the stu- 
dent, and must constitute an original contribution to the field of computer science or 
engineering science and/or design. The dissertation must have good literary form and 
style and must present a thorough review and survey of prior study and work in the 
area of research, with acceptable standards of documentation. It is anticipated that the 
work leading to the completion of the dissertation will require a minimum of 24 hours of 
research credits or satisfactory evidence of equivalent time devoted to research and 
preparation of the dissertation. 

Time to Completion Requirements for this degree must be completed within five years 
after admission to candidacy. 

Oral Examination Upon completion and approval of the dissertation and fulfillment of 
all other requirements, the candidate must pass a final oral examination conducted by 
his/her advisory and examining committee. The examination will be primarily a defense 
of the dissertation, although other questions necessary to determine the candidate's 
knowledge, critical ability, and reasoning power in the general field of study related to 
the research may be asked in order to establish the qualifications of the candidate for 
the degree. 

Faculty 

f Indicates regular membership in the graduate faculty. 
Indicates associate membership in the graduate faculty. 

Chemical Engineering 
Professors 

f Richard C. Bailie, Ph.D. (Iowa St. U.). Emeritus. Biomass pyrolysis, Fluidization, Thermal 

process. 
*Eung H. Cho, Ph.D. (U. of Utah). Coal processing, Leaching and solvent extraction, Environ- 
mental science. 
f Eugene V. Cilento, Ph.D. (U. Cincinnati). Chairperson. Physiological transport phenomena, 

Biomedical engineering, Image analysis, Mathematical modeling. 
T Dady B. Dadyburjor, Ph.D. (U. Del.). Catalysis, Reaction engineering, Micellization, Coal 

liquefaction. 
Alfred F. Galli, M.S. (WVU). Emeritus. Coal conversion, Process engineering, Biomass 

production. 
f Rakesh K. Gupta, Ph.D. (U. Del.). Polymer processing, Rheology, Non-Newtonian fluid 

mechanics, Composite materials. 
f Hisashi O. Kono, Dr. Engr. (Kyushu U.). Fluidization, Powder technology, Powder material 

science. 
f Edwin L. Kugler, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins U.). Catalysis, Adsorption, Coal liquefaction. 
Alfred H. Stiller, Ph.D. (U. Cincinnati). Chemistry (physical inorganic chemistry), Solution 

chemistry, Coal liquefaction, Carbon science. 
f Richard Turton, Ph.D., P.E. (Ore. St. U.). Fluidization, Heat transfer, Reaction kinetics, 

Chemical process design. 
*Ray Y.K. Yang, Ph.D. (Princeton U.). Biochemical and chemical reaction engineering, Mem- 
brane reactors, Biomass conversion, Nonlinear dynamics. 

College of Engineering and Mineral Resources 263 



T John W. Zondlo, Ph.D. (Carnegie Mellon U.). Coal enhancement and utilization, Carbon 

science, Fluid-phase equilibria. 
Associate Professors 
^Joseph A. Shaeiwitz, Ph.D. (Carnegie Mellon U.). Mass transfer, Drug dissolution, Interfacial 

phenomena, Design. 
Charter D. Stinespring, Ph.D. (WVU). Wide band gap semiconductor growth and etching, 

Surface kinetics. 
Assistant Professors 

T Aubrey L. Miller, Ph.D. (III. Inst. Tech.). Fluidization, Multi-phase flow, Reaction engineering, 
^eter S. Stansberry, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Research. Coal and carbon science, Catalysis, 

High-temperature reactions, Properties of carbonaceous materials. 

Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Professors 

Samuel G. Bonasso, P.E., M.S.C.E. (WVU). Adjunct. Cable transportation, Street engineering, 

Communication and creativity in engineering. 
James G. Collin, Ph.D., P.E. (U. of Ca., Berkley). Adjunct, Geotechnical engineering, Geosynthetics, 

Earth retaining structures, Slope stabilization, Waste containment. 
f Echol E. Cook, Ph.D., P.E. (Okla. St. U.). George B. Berry Chair Professor, Environmental 

engineering, Biological treatment, Industrial waste treatment, Hazardous and solid waste 

management, Physical and chemical treatment process. 
Donald W. Eck, Ph.D., P.E. (Clemson U.). Transportation engineering, Traffic, Highways. 
James L. Green, P.E., M.S.C.E. (WVU). Adjunct. Environmental engineering, Water treatment, Water 

quality. 
William J. Harman, P.E., M.S.C.E. (WVU). Adjunct. Construction methods, Construction 

specifications. 
f W. Joseph Head, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Waste utilization, Highway and airfield pavements, Concrete. 
tGanga Rao V. S. Hota, Ph.D., P.E. (N.C. St. U.). Director, Constructed Facilities Center. 

Mathematical modeling of engineering systems, Bridge engineering, Prefabricated housing. 
Charles R. Jenkins, Ph.D. (Okla. St. U.). Emeritus. 
tLarry D. Luttrell, Ph.D., P.E. (Cornell U.). Analysis and design of structures: steel, composite slabs, 

metal buildings, Case studies of failures. 
Michael McCawley, Ph.D. (NYU). Adjunct. Environmental engineering, Air pollution, Air quality. 
'Lyle K. Moulton, Ph.D., P.E. (WVU). Emeritus. 

t William A. Sack, Ph.D., P.E. (Mich. St. U.). Emeritus. Environmental engineering, Biological treat- 
ment, Bioremediation of hazardous wastes, Nutrient removal, Industrial waste treatment and 

reclamation. 
f H. Jayalath Siriwardane, Ph.D. (VPI). Geotechnical engineering/geomechanics, Finite 

element method, Computer applications. 
tJohn P. Zaniewski, Ph.D. (Texas). Asphalt Technology Professor. Director, Harley O. Staggers 

National Transportation Center. Pavement materials, Design, Construction, Maintenance, 

Infrastructure management. 
Associate Professors 
Dennis C. Chambers, P.E., M.S.C.E. (WVU). Adjunct. Geotechnical engineering, Construction and 

materials. 
t H. L. Chen, Ph.D. (Northwestern U.). Structural dynamics, Structural experimentation, Dynamic 

soil-structure interaction, Damage in reinforced concrete structures. 
t Julio F. Davalos, Ph.D. (VPI). Finite element analysis and modelling of structures, Spatial stability 

investigation, Materials characterization of engineered timber products. 
f Darrell R. Dean, Jr., L.L.S., Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Land surveying, Mapping, Photo grammetry. 
Robert N. Eli, Ph.D., P.E. (U. Iowa). Hydrology, Hydraulics, Computer graphics. 
Donald D. Gray, Ph.D., P.E. (Purdue U.). Fluid flow, Computational fluid mechanics. 
f Udaya B. Halabe, Ph.D., P.E. (MIT). Nondestructive evaluation and in-situ condition Assessment 

of structures and materials, Wave propagation, Structural analysis and dynamics. 
f David R. Martinelli, Ph.D. (U. Md.). Chair. Transportation engineering, Traffic operations, Systems 

analysis, Infrastructure management. 
David A. Pask, P.E., M.S., Eviron. (Tech. U. of Nova Scotia). Adjunct. Environmental engineering, 



264 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Water treatment, Public health, Wastewater treatment. 

r Brian E. Reed, Ph.D. (SUNY-Buffalo). Environmental engineering, Hazardous waste treatment, 
Groundwater remediation. 

Robert W. Wheeler, M.S.C.E. (WVU). Adjunct. Environmental engineering, Public health, Water 
supply. 

William D. Wyant, M.S.C.E. (WVU). Adjunct. Transportation engineering, Construction methods. 

Assistant Professors 

Thippeswamy Hemanth, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Structural analysis, Advanced structural 
materials. 

Jie Huang, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Fluid mechanics, Elementary particle physics. 

Roberto Lopez-Anido, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Modeling and experimental characterization of 
composite and hybrid material components and systems for civil structures; Bridge 
engineering; timber bridges; Numerical methods of structural analysis; Applied mechanics. 

Kumanaswamy Sirakumaran, Ph.D. (Colorado). Adjunct. Sediment transport and hydraulic 
engineering. 

tRoger Viadero, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Physical chemical processes, Nuclear waste man- 
agement, Industrial and hazardous waste treatment. 

Computer Engineering 
Professors 

T Powsiri Klinkhachorn, Ph.D. (WVU). Microprocessor applications, Computer architecture, 

Binary and nonbinary logic. 
f Roy S. Nutter, Jr., Ph.D., RE. (WVU). Electric vehicles, Neural networks, Microprocessor 

systems, Computer architecture, Expert systems. 
Robert E. Swartwout, Ph.D. (U. III.). Emeritus. 

f Stuart K. Tewksbury, Ph.D. (U. Rochester). VLSI & ULSI digital electronics, Digital communica- 
tions, Microprocessor systems. 
Associate Professors 
f Hany H. Ammar, Ph.D. (U. Notre Dame). Modeling and evaluation of parallel and distributed 

systems, Performance and dependability. 
r Robert L. McConnell, Ph.D. (U. Ky.). Undergraduate coordinator, Electronic instrumentation, 

Power control, Microcomputer based applications, Engineering design. 
T Afzel Noore, Ph.D. (WVU). Associate Dean. Fault-tolerant computing, Design for testability, 

VLSI design and testing, Computer architecture, Distributed and parallel processing. 
Assistant Professors 
tBojan Cukic, Ph.D. (U. Houston). High-assurance systems, Software engineering, Parallel and 

distributed computing, Fault-tolerant systems, Medical imaging. 

Computer Science 
Professors 

r John M. Atkins Ph.D. (U. Pitt). Design of database management systems, Analysis of algo- 
rithms, Mathematics of computation. 

f D. Michael Henry, Ph.D. (Texas Christian U). Databases, Cryptography, Neural networks. 

*Franz X. Hiergeist, Ph.D. (U. Pitt.). Mathematics of computation. 

f Ali Mili, Ph.D. (U. Illinois). Software Engineering, Program specification and verification. 

Wayne A. Muth, Ph.D. (Iowa St. U.). Emeritus. 

f Y. V. Ramana Reddy, Ph.D. (WVU). Artificial intelligence, Knowledge-based simulation, 
Computer graphics. 

George E. Trapp, Ph.D. (Carnegie Mellon U). Numerical analysis, Mathematical programming, 
Network models. 

Associate Professors 

William H. Dodrill, M.S. (Columbia U.). Emeritus. 

f V. Jagannathan, Ph.D. (Vanderbilt U.). Distributed Intelligent Systems, Internet and security 
technologies. 

tSrinivas Kankanahalli, Ph.D. (N. Mex. St. U.). Artificial Intelligence, Connectionism/neural 
networks, Parallel processing. 



College of Engineering and Mineral Resources 265 



T James D. Mooney, Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Co-Interim chairperson. Operating systems, Computer 

architecture, Software portability. 

^umitra Reddy, Ph.D. (WVU). (Research). Healthcare informatics, Componentware, Intelligent 
systems. Information technology evaluation. 

T Murali Sitaraman, Ph.D. (Ohio. St. U.). Software engineering, Data structures, Software reuse. 

r Frances L. Van Scoy, Ph.D. (U. Va.). Programming languages and compilers, Software 
engineering, Parallel processing. 

Assistant Professors 

T John R. Callahan, Ph.D. (U. Md.). Development of programming languages. Tools for distrib- 
uted systems. Software engineering. 

T William F. Klostermeyer, Ph.D. (U. Fla.). Design and analysis of algorithms, Combinatorics, 
Graph theory. 

Electrical Engineering 
Professors 

Walton W. Cannon, Ph.D. (U. III.). Emeritus. 

Muhammad A. Choudhry, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). Power system control, DC transmission, Stability, 

Power electronics. 
r Wils L. Cooley, Ph.D., PE. (Carnegie-Mellon U.). Graduate Coordinator. Biomedical engineer- 
ing, Electronics, Design. 
r Ali Feliachi, Ph.D. (Ga. Tech.). Large-scale systems, Adaptive control, Power systems. 
r Ronald L. Klein, Ph.D. (U. Iowa). Automatic control, Estimation theory, System identification, 

Electric vehicles. 
t Craig S. Sims, Ph.D. (SMU). Signal processing, Control systems, Estimation theory. 
Nelson Smith, Jr., D.Sc. (U. Pitt). Emeritus. 
Associate Professors 

Everette C. Dubbe, B.S.E E (S. Dak. St. U.). Emeritus. 

f Parviz Famouri, Ph.D. (U. Ky.). Analysis and control of electrical machines, Motor drives, 
Power electronics, Electric vehicles. 
Lawrence Hornak, Ph.D. (Rutgers U.). Co-Interim Chair. Optics, VLSI, Integrated optics, 

Microstructures. 
r MarkA. Jerabek, Ph.D., P.E. (Purdue U.). Acoustics, Ultrasonic tomography, Electromagnetics. 
Assistant Professors 
+ Biswajit Das, Ph.D. (Purdue U.). High speed electronic and photonic devices, Nanoscale 

device fabrication and testing, Electro-optic and nonlinear optical materials and devices, 

Nano-optics. 
'Stephanie Caswell Schuckers, Ph.D. (U. Michigan). Signal processing, Cardiovascular 

engineering, Medical devices. 

Industrial and Management Systems Engineering 
Professors 

'Rashpal S. Ahluwalia, Ph.D., P.E. (Western Ontario U.). Computer integrated manufacturing, 

Flexible manufacturing, Robotics, Expert systems. Process control and modeling. 
"Jack Byrd, Jr., Ph.D., P.E. (WVU). Operations research, Production systems, Entrepreneurial 

studies. 
'Robert C. Creese, Ph.D., P.E. (Penn. St. U.). Manufacturing processes/systems, Foundry 

engineering, Cost engineering. 
*Wafik H. Iskander, Ph.D., P.E. (Tex. Tech U.). Operations research, Simulation, Applied 

statistics. 
f Majid Jaraiedi, Ph.D. (U. Mich.). Quality control and applied statistics, Information systems. 
T L. Ted Moore, Ph.D. (Rice U.). Emeritus. 
r Ralph W. Plummer, Ph.D., P.E. (WVU). Chairperson. Human factors, System safety, Industrial 

hygiene. 
T Terrence J. Stobbe. Ph.D. (U. Mich.). Ergonomics, System safety, Industrial hygiene. 
Associate Professors 
T Warren R. Myers, Ph.D. (WVU). Industrial hygiene, Ergonomics, Safety engineering. 



266 WVU Graduate Catalog 



"B. Gopalakrishnan. Ph.D. (VPI). Manufacturing engineering. Artificial intelligence. Concurrent 

engineering. 
Assistant Professors 
"Dianne McMullin. Ph.D. (Nebraska). Ergonomics. Safety engineering. Occupational safety. 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 
Professors 

'Richard A. Bajura. Ph.D.. P.E. (U. N. Dame). Director of NRCCE. Fluids engineering. 

'Reda Bata. Ph.D. (U. of Florida). Alternate fuels. Thermal sciences. Engine testing. 

Edward F. Byars. Ph.D.. P.E. (U. III.). Emeritus. 

'Ismail Celik. Ph.D. (U. Iowa). Fluids engineering. 

Ken-Minn Chang. Ph.D. (U. of Calif. Berkeley). Materials. Physical metallurgy. 

'Nigel Clark. Ph.D. (U. Natel. So. Africa). Multiphase flows. I.C. engines. 

'Allen C. Cogley. Ph.D. (Stanford U.) Dean. Aerodynamics. Fluid mechanics. Aerospace 
engineering. 

'Russell K. Dean. Ph.D. (WVU). Associate Provost for Curriculum and Instruction. Engineering 
mechanics. 

Hasan T. Gencsoy. M.S.M.E. (WVUV Emeritus. 

Russell R. Haynes. Ph.D.. P.E. (WVU). Adjunct. Engineering design. 

'Eric K. Johnson. Ph.D.. P.E. (U. Wise). Heat transfer. Combustion. Thermodynamics. Gas- 
solid flows. 

'John Kuhlman. Ph.D. (Case West. Res. U.). Fluid mechanics. 

'Steve Lewellen. Ph.D. (UCLA). Research. Fluid dynamics. 

Thomas R. Long. P.E.. Ed.D. (WVU). Engineering design. 

'John L. Loth. Ph.D.. P.E. (U. Toronto). Aerospace systems. Combustion. 

'Donald W. Lyons. Ph.D.. P.E. (Ga. Tech.). Chairperson. Manufacturing systems. Instrumenta- 
tion. Engines and emissions. 

'Kenneth H. Means. Ph.D.. P.E. (WVU). Kinematics. Dynamics and stability. Friction and wear. 

In-Meei Neou. Ph.D. (Stanford U.). Emeritus. 

Nathan Ness. Ph.D. (Poly. Inst. NY). Emeritus and Visiting. Aerodynamics. Thermodynamics. 

*G. Michael Palmer. Ph.D. (WVU). Instrumentation. Microprocessor applications. 

Augustine A. Pitrolo. B.S.M.E. (WVU). Adjunct. Fossil energy. 

Helen L. Plants. P.E.. M.S.C.E. (WVU). Emerita. 

Harold Schall. B.S. (C. W. Post Coll.). Adjunct. Quality function deployment. 

Samir Shoukry. Ph.D. (U. Aston in Birmingham). Research. Structural dynamics. Neural nets. 
Instrumentation. 

"Nithiam T. Sivaneri. Ph.D. (Stanford U.). Associate Chairperson. Structural mechanics. 
Composite materials. Finite-element analysis. 

Robert D. Slonneger. P.E.. M.S.M.E. (U. Tex.). Emeritus. 

"James E. Smith. Ph.D. (WVU). Mechanical design. 

"John E. Sneckenberger. Ph.D.. P.E. (WVU). Mechanical design and automation. 

William Squire. M.A. (U. Buffalo). Emeritus. 

'Charles Stanley. Ph.D. (WVU). Pulmonary bioengineering. Mechanical instrumentation. 

Charles E. Wales. Ed.D. (WVU). Emeritus. Engineering Education. 

"Richard E. Walters. Ph.D. (WVU). Emeritus. Aerospace engineering. 

Donald T Worrell. P.E.. M.S.E. (WVU). Emeritus. 

Associate Professors 

Rodney Anderson. Ph.D. (U. Mo.-Rolla). Adjunct. Aerosol and particle science. 

'Chris Atkinson. Sc.D. (MIT). Fluid Mechanics. Instrumentation. Engine emissions. 

'Larry Banta. Ph.D. (Ga. Tech.). Robotics. Automation. 

'Ever Barbero. Ph.D. (VPI). Structural Mechanics. Materials. Constructed facilities. 

'Mridul Gautam. Ph.D. (WVU). Fluid mechanics. 

"Bruce Kang. Ph.D. (U. Wash.). Experimental mechanics. Advanced materials. 

'Gary Morris. Ph.D. (WVU). Associate Chairperson and Graduate Program Director. Fluid 
mechanics. Combustion. 

'Victor Mucino. D.E. (U. Wise. -Mil.). Engineering design. 

'Marcello Napolitano. Ph.D. (Okla. St. U.). Aircraft stability and control. Feedback control. 
Dynamics. 

College of Engineering and Mineral Resources 267 



timothy Norman, Ph.D. (Purdue). Advanced composite materials, Fracture mechanics, 

Experimental mechanics, Biomechanics. 
John E. Notestein, M.S.M.E. (Purdue U.). Adjunct. Fossil energy. 
f Jacky Prucz, Ph.D. (Ga. Tech.). Structural dynamics, Composite materials. 
Jaiyoung Ruy, M.D. (Catholic Med. Coll. Korea). Adjunct. Bioengineering. 
Larry D. Strickland, Ph.D. (WVU). Adjunct. Fossil energy. 
Wallace S. Venable, P.E., Ed.D. (WVU). Emeritus. Engineering mechanics. 
Assistant Professors 

Emad Amin, Ph.D. (U. of Leeds, UK). Research. Computational fluid dynamics, Combustion. 
Robert Bond, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Aerodynamics, Thermoscience. 
Kristine Craven, Ph.D. (WVU). Visiting. 

Jaiji Du, Ph.D. (U. of Wash.). Fracture and experimental mechanics. 
John R. Etherton, M.S. (Geo. Wash. U.). Adjunct. Mechanical system safety. 
f David Lewellen, Ph.D. (Cornell). Research. Fluid Dynamic Turbulence. 
Hwei-Min Lu, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Thermodynamics, Machine design. 
Jason Smith, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Computational fluid dynamics. 
Greg Thompson, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Thermodynamics, Machine design. 
f Wenguang Wang, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Mechanical design, Engines and emissions. 
W. Scott Wayne, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Machine design. 

Mining Engineering 
Professors 

Jay H. Kelley, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Distinguished. Emeritus. 

f A. Wahab Khair, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Rock mechanics, Ground control. 

f Syd S. Peng, Ph.D. (Stanford U.). Charles T. Hollard Distinguished Professor of Mining 

Engineering and Chairman. Longwall mining, Ground control. 
f David C. Yang, Ph.D. (U.C. -Berkeley). Research. Coal/mineral processing. 
Associate Professors 

Donald M. Bondurant, M.S.E.M. (WVU). Emeritus. 
Joseph D. McClung, M.S.E.M. (U. Pitt.). Emeritus. 

r Felicia F. Peng, Ph.D. (WVU). Coal preparation, Coal utilization, Process control, Plant design. 
Assistant Professors. 
Yi Luo, Ph.D. (WVU). Research. Surface subsidence. 

Particle Analysis Center 

Thomas P. Meloy, Ph.D. (MIT). Benedum Professor. Powder science, Mineral liberation, Plant 
circuit analysis. 

Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering 
Professors 

Samuel Ameri, P.E., M.S. Pet. E. (WVU). Chairman. Formation evaluation, 
^hashayar Aminian, Ph.D. (U. Mich.). Natural gas engineering, Reservoir simulation. 
Robert W. Chase, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Adjunct. Natural gas engineering. 
H'homas P. Meloy, Ph.D. (MIT). Petroleum engineering simulation. 
*JamesA. Wasson, P.E., M.S.P.N.G. (Penn. St. U.). Emeritus. Reservoir engineering, En- 
hanced oil recovery. 
Larry Woodford, A.M. (Ind. U.). Adjunct. 
Associate Professors 

f H. Ilkin Bilgesu, Ph.D., P.E. (Penn. St. U.). Drilling engineering. 
r Shahab Mohaghegh, Ph.D. (Penn. St. U.). Reservoir engineering. 

Safety and Environmental Management 
Professors 

f Daniel E. Della-Giustina, Ph.D. (Mich. St. U.). Safety management services, Sport safety, 
Transportation safety. 



268 WVU Graduate Catalog 



WVarren Myers, Ph.D. (WVU). Interim Chairperson. Industrial hygiene, Human factors, Safety 

engineering. 
Associate Professors 

f Andrew Sorine, Ed.D. (WVU). Safety studies/management education. 
r Gary Winn, Ph.D. (Ohio St. U.). Safety studies, Transportation safety. 
Assistant Professors 

David L. Durham, M.S. (WVU). Research. Environmental management. 
*Linda Frederick, Ph.D. (U. of Mich.). Industrial health/Ergonomics. 
*Michael J. Klishis, Ph.D. (WVU). Miner training, Curriculum development. 
David Whaley, Ph.D. (St. U. of NY at Buffalo). Industrial hygiene/Environmental management. 

Extension and Outreach 

Extension and Outreach is a new unit within the College of Engineering and Mineral 
Resources that is composed of two programs: Mining Extension and Industrial Extension. 
Industrial Extension was transfered into CEMR on September 1, 1996. 
James M. Dean, M.S.E.M. (WVU). Director. Mine management, Mine safety and health, Initial 

miner training. 

Industrial Extension Service 

James M. Dean, M.S.E.M. (WVU). Interim Associate Director, Mine management, Mine safety 

and health, Initial miner training. 
Extension Engineers 
Thomas A. Bailey, P.E., B.I.E. (Ohio St. U.). Quality assurance, Systems, Environmental 

planning and waste reduction, New production technologies, Technology transfer. 
Thomas R. Bodnar, P.E., B.S.M.E. (U. Pitt). Modern manufacturing methods and technologies, 

Management philosophies and business management practices, Productivity improvement. 
Lawrence D. Dixon, P.E., M.S.C.S.E. (WV Graduate College) B.S.E.M. (WVU) B.S.E.E. 

(W.V.U.I.T.). Energy conversion, Energy conversion devices, Efficient energy usage, Digital 

control systems, Cellular manufacturing. 
Raymond D. Neupert, P.E., B.S.I.E. (WVU). Technology development, Quality management 

systems, Cellular manufacturing, Strategic planning, Cost control. 
Kathi A. Shrider, BS-Economics. (U. of Charleston). Information systems, Environmental 

planning and waste reduction, New production tchnologies and technology transfer, Product, 

Develoment process re-engineering. 
Merle Thomas, Jr., B.A., M. A. -Mathematics. (U. of Texas). Computerized production control and 

scheduling systems. Designing and installing process controlers, Programmable logic control 

lers, Device drivers. 

Mining Extension Service 
Professor 

Joseph C. Dorton, B.S. (Concord C). Mine foreman training, Electrical training, Mandatory 

miner training courses. 
Associate Professors 
Robrt L. Halstead, B.S. (Morris Harvey College). Emeritus. Mine foreman training, Electrical 

training, Production technology. 
Thomas L. Savage, B.S. (Cornell U.). Emeritus. Hydraulics. 
Assistant Professors 
'Cynthia M. Bindocci, Ed.D. (WVU). Director-COMER Museum, Small museums, Collection 

management, Environmental monitoring, Women and coal, History of technology. 
Luther B. Ferguson. Emeritus. 
James H. Kincaid, B.S. (WV Tech). Mine foreman training, Mandatory miner training courses, 

Mine management, CPR training. 
Mining Extension Agents 
James M. Dean, M.S.E.M. (WVU). Mine management, Mine safety and health, Initial miner 

training. 
Thomas W. Hall, B.S. (Fairmont St. C). Mine foreman training, Mandatory miner training, 

Mining methods. 

College of Engineering and Mineral Resources 269 



William E. Moser, B.S. (Robert Morris C). Director— Emergency Preparedness Center. Mine 

fires, Mine rescue, Mine health and safety. 
Joseph E. Spiker, M.S. (WVU). Interim Associate Director. Coal mining operations, Safety and 

health management, Education administration. 
Ireland Sutton, B.S. (WVU Inst, of Tech.). Surface mine blasting, Underground and surface 

power systems, Mandatory miner training. 

Mine Emergency Preparedness Center 

William E. Moser, B.S. (Robert Morris Coll.). Director. Mine rescue/safety. 
Joseph E. Spiker, M.S. (WVU). Mine rescue/safety. 

COMER Museum 

Cynthia M. Bindocci, Ed.D. (WVU). Director. 



Chemical Engineering 

Eugene V. Cilento, Ph.D., Chairperson 

403 Engineering Sciences Building 

e-mail: che-info@cemr.vwu.edu 

web: http://www.cemr.wvu.edu/~wwwche/ 

Degrees Offered: 
Master of Science in Chemical Engineering 

Master of Science in Engineering with a major in Chemical Engineering 
Doctor of Philosophy with a major in Chemical Engineering 

The Department of Chemical Engineering, with 13 faculty members, 120 undergradu- 
ates, and over 30 graduate students, has one of the oldest doctoral-granting programs 
in the University. From the initial doctoral degree in 1 932, the graduate course program 
has been based on advanced chemical engineering fundamentals, while the research 
program has reflected a balance of fundamental research areas and their application to 
relevant technological areas such as bioengineering, catalysis, coal conversion, mate- 
rials, and polymer processing. 

Faculty Research Areas 

Chemical engineering faculty are presently involved in the following research areas: 
biochemical engineering, biomedical engineering, carbon science, catalysis, fluid me- 
chanics, heat transfer, materials engineering, polymers and polymer rheology, reaction 
engineering, separation processes, solution chemistry, surface science, and thermody- 
namics. These fundamental areas are finding applications in biochemical technology, 
biotransport, coal gasification and liquefaction, materials handling and processing, in- 
situ combustion, non-fuel uses of coal, carbon products, and synthetic fuels. 

Faculty members possess a wide variety of industrial experience and are routinely in 
contact with their counterparts in industry. This contact with real engineering problems 
enables them to convey a practical experience to students while keeping in perspective 
many of the fundamental concepts involved in graduate study. During the last five years, 
the chemical engineering faculty have authored or coauthored 1 book, published over 
230 journal articles, have been issued 6 patents, made over 275 presentations at pro- 
fessional meetings, and supervised the completion of 37 master's and 15 doctoral de- 
grees and over 40 post-doctoral students and visiting scholars. In addition, faculty 
members have taught short courses throughout the United States and abroad. 



270 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Degree Programs 

The department is authorized to admit students to the following degree programs: 
master of science in chemical engineering (M.S. Ch.E.), master of science in engineer- 
ing (M.S.E.), and College of Engineering and Mineral Resources interdisciplinary doc- 
tor of philosophy (Ph.D.). Students in these programs must comply with the rules and 
regulations as presented in the general requirements for graduate work in the College 
of Engineering and Mineral Resources and in the Department of Chemical Engineer- 
ing. Students interested in pursuing work for a master's or doctoral degree in chemical 
engineering should contact the department for copies of the required guidelines and 
application information. 

Admission 

Admission to the M.S. Ch.E. program is restricted to those holding a baccalaureate 
degree in chemical engineering or its equivalent. The M.S.E. program is available to 
students holding baccalaureate degrees in other fields of engineering and the physical 
sciences who wish to pursue a broad interdisciplinary program relevant to the major 
graduate areas administered by the department. To be admitted as a regular graduate 
student, an applicant must have a B.S. degree and a sound record in previous college 
work with a minimum 3.0/4.0 cumulative grade-point average. Applicants who cannot 
meet these conditions may be considered for admission in a conditional category. Stu- 
dents admitted with deficiencies in their undergraduate programs are required to take 
some chemical engineering courses as prerequisites for graduate courses. These re- 
quirements are stated as a condition for admission. 

Planned Programs 

M.S. Ch.E. candidates should expect to obtain their degree in about 1 8 months. M.S.E. 
students typically require 1 to 1 1/2 years beyond completion of prerequisite courses. 
Typically, the prerequisite courses include as a minimum: Ch E 110, 111, 112, 142, 145, 
and 172. All M.S. degree candidates are required to perform research and will follow a 
planned program which conforms to either of the following outlines: 

• A minimum of 30 semester credit hours, excluding seminar, not more than six of 
which are in research leading to an acceptable thesis. 

• A minimum of 33 semester credit hours, excluding seminar, not more than three of 
which are in research leading to an acceptable problem report. 

The course work M.S. degree option is not offered by the Department of Chemical 
Engineering. 

Required Courses 

All students are required to take Ch E 301, 344, and 345, and all full-time students 
are required to take one credit of journal club/seminar (Ch E 400) for each semester 
enrolled. The research advisor, in conjunction with an advisory and examining commit- 
tee (AEC) to be designated by each student, will be responsible for following depart- 
mental guidelines to determine the plan of study appropriate to the student's program. 

A written research proposal and oral presentation of this proposal is required of all 
M.S. students. This oral defense is administered by the student's AEC and must be 
completed by the end of the second semester of the first year for M.S. Ch.E candidates, 
and as soon as possible but not later than the end of the second semester of the 
second year for M.S.E. candidates. 



Chemical Engineering 271 



Final Examination 

All students are required to pass a final oral examination, administered by their AEC, 
covering both the thesis or problem report (depending on the program selected) and 
related course material. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

A candidate for the degree of doctor of philosophy must comply with the rules and 
regulations as outlined in the general requirements for graduate work in engineering 
and the specific requirements stated in the departmental guidelines. Students who are 
interested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree in the Department of Chemical Engineering should 
contact the department for specific information. A program with a major in chemical 
engineering, designed to meet the needs and objectives of each student, will be devel- 
oped in consultation with the student's research advisor and advisory and examining 
committee (AEC). It should be emphasized that the Ph.D. degree is primarily a re- 
search degree, and therefore the research work for a doctoral dissertation should show 
a high order of originality on the part of the student and must offer an original contribu- 
tion to the field of engineering science. 

Admission Admission to the Ph.D. program is open to students who qualify as regular 
graduate students and who have obtained a B.S. or M.S. degree in science or engi- 
neering. Students admitted must have demonstrated an excellent academic record in 
previously completed college course work with a minimum cumulative grade-point av- 
erage of 3.0/4.0. Three letters of recommendation are required, and GRE scores are 
required by the department. Students in the Ph.D. program should complete the re- 
quirements in two to four years. 

Required Courses All B.S. students entering the Ph.D. program are required to take 
Ch E 301, 344, and 345, while M.S. students entering the program must demonstrate 
equivalent courses taken for graduate credit. In addition, all full-time students must 
take one credit of seminar/journal club (Ch E 400) each semester. For a student admit- 
ted directly after the B.S. degree, the Ph.D. program consists of a minimum of 36 course 
credit hours, excluding research (Ch E 497) and seminar/journal club (Ch E 400). If the 
student has an M.S. in chemical engineering from WVU, the program consists of a 
minimum of 12 course credit hours (excluding Ch E 497 and Ch E 400). If the student 
has an M.S. in chemical engineering from another institution, the program consists of a 
minimum of 18 course credit hours (excluding Ch E 497 and Ch E 400). Students must 
complete a minor, consisting of a minimum of nine semester hours of a coherent set of 
courses taken outside the department. These courses may be related to the major 
research area. Nontechnical courses are considered only under exceptional circum- 
stances. Courses at the 200 level may be acceptable. All courses must be approved by 
the AEC and the academic advisor. Students must complete graduate courses with an 
overall course work average of 3.0 or better (exclusive of research credits) and com- 
plete all Ch E courses with an overall grade-point average of 3.0 (exclusive of research 
credits). A minimum of 24 credit hours in dissertation research is required. Also, two 
semesters of full-time attendance at the Morgantown campus is required to complete 
the residency requirement. 

Examinations All students must pass the Ph.D. qualifying examination given in their 
first year at WVU. This examination is designed to assess the basic competency of 
students in the chemical engineering field to determine whether or not they have suffi- 
cient knowledge to undertake independent research. 



272 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Within twelve months of passing the qualifying examination or of entering the Ph.D. 
program, whichever is later, the student must successfully defend an original research 
proposition in an oral examination. The written proposition, developed by the student 
alone, remains the intellectual property of the student and must be on a topic unrelated 
to the student's own research work for the dissertation. 

Research Proposal A student must receive acceptance of a written dissertation re- 
search proposal and must also successfully defend this proposal to the student's AEC. 
This requirement must be completed within six months of passing the qualifying exami- 
nation or of entering the Ph.D. program, whichever is later. The research work for the 
doctoral dissertation should show a high order of originality on the part of the student 
and must offer an original contribution to the field of engineering science. 

A student who has successfully completed all course work, passed the qualifying 
examination, and successfully defended the original research proposition and research 
proposal is defined as one who is a candidate for the Ph.D. degree. 

In order to complete the Ph.D. requirements, a student must pass a final oral exami- 
nation on the results embodied in the dissertation. This examination is open to the 
public and, in order to evaluate critically the student's competency, may include testing 
on material in related fields, as deemed necessary by the AEC. In addition, since the 
Ph.D. degree is primarily a research degree that embodies the results of an original 
research proposal and represents a significant contribution to scientific literature, the 
student must submit a manuscript on this research to the AEC. 

Chemical Engineering (CH E) 

212. Biochemical Separations. 3 HR. PR: CHE 112 or consent. Modeling and design of separa- 
tion processes applicable to recovery of biological products. Topics include filtration, centrifuga- 
tion, extraction, adsorption, chromatography, electrophoresis, membranes, crystallization, examples 
from industry. 3 HR. lee. 

220. Particle Processing. 4 HR. PR: CHEM 141 or CHEM 246 or CHE 142 or MAE 101 or MAE 
141. Processes of particle processing such as size separation, size reduction, dewatering, and 
concentration; flotation of oxide and sulfide minerals. Plant practice for the processing of minerals 
will be covered by example. (3 HR. lee./ 1 HR. lab.) 

221. Extractive Processing. 4 HR. PR: CHEM 141 or CHEM 246 or CHE 142 or MAE 101 or MAE 
141. Topics include the basic mechanisms of unit processes of leaching, solvent extraction, and 
electrowinning; roasting, smelting, and refining. (3 HR. lee./ 1 HR. lab.) 

224. Coal Conversion Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 134; Coreq: CHE 112, 172. Coal conversion 
processes from the unit-operations approach; thermodynamics, kinetics, and evaluation of sys- 
tem requirements and performance. 3 HR. lee. 

255. Electronic Matls Processing. 3 HR. PR: Junior standing in Engineering and Mineral Re- 
sources. The design and application of thermal, plasma, and ion assisted processing methodolo- 
gies; solid state, gas phase, surface, and plasma chemistry underpinnings, thin film nucleation 
and growth and growth; the effect of processing methods and conditions on mechanical, electri- 
cal, and optical properties. (Date effective — spring, 1999). 

256. Polymer Processing. 3 HR. PR: Junior standing in Engineering and Mineral Resources. Flow 
behavior in idealized situations; Extrusion; Calendering; Coating; Injection molding; Fiber spinning; 
Film blowing; Mixing; Heat and mass transfer; Flow instabilities. (Date effective — fall, 1999). 

257. Polymer Composites Processing. 3 HR. PR: Junior standing in Engineering and Mineral 
Resources. Advantages and application of polymer composites; Chemistry and kinetics of the 
thermosetting polymers; Hand lay up and spray up: Compression molding; Resing transfer mold- 
ing; Reaction injection molding; Filament winding; Pultrusion. (Date effective— fall, 1998). 



Chemical Engineering 273 



258. Polymer Science and Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CHEM 134. Coreq: CHE 145. Polymer classi- 
fication, polymer synthesis, molecular weights and experimental techniques, thermodynamics, 
rubber elasticity, mechanical behavior, crystallization, diffusion, rheology, extrusion and injection 
molding. 3 HR. lee. 

260. Chemical Process Safety. 3 HR. PR: CHE 41 or consent. Introduction to safety, health and 
loss prevention in the chemical process industry; regulations, toxicology, hazard identification, 
system safety analysis and safety design techniques. 3 HR. lee. 

265. Interfacial Phenomena. 3 HR. PR: CHE 145, CHEM 246 or consent. Processes occurring at 
fluid/fluid and fluid/solid interfaces. Interfacial tension, contact angle, wetting, transport phenom- 
ena near interfaces, properties and stability of colloids, colloid transport phenomena, surfactants, 
micelles and emulsions. 3 HR. lee. 

272. Biochemical Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CHE 172 or consent. Kinetics of enzymatic and micro- 
bial reactions, interactions between biochemical reactions and transport phenomena, analysis 
and design of bioreactors, enzyme technology, cell cultures, bioprocess engineering. 3 HR. lee 

280. Chemical Engineering Problems. 0-6 HR. For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. For 
students desiring to take only a portion of a course, for individual projects, for subjects not cov- 
ered in other courses. 

301 . Transport Phenomena. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Introduction to equations of change (heat, mass and 
momentum transfer) with a differential balance approach. Use in Newtonian flow, turbulent flow, mass 
and energy transfer, radiation, convection. Estimation of transport coefficients. 3 HR. lee. 

330. Process Dynamics and Control. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Dynamic response of processes and 
control instruments. Use of Laplace transforms and frequency response methods in analysis of 
control systems. Application of control systems in chemical reactors, distillation, and heat transfer 
operations. Introduction to nonlinear systems. 3 HR. lee. 

331 . Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering. 3 HR. PR: MATH 18 and consent. Classifi- 
cation and solution of mathematical problems important in chemical engineering. Treatment and 
interpretation of engineering data. Analytical methods for ordinary and partial differential equa- 
tions, including orthogonal functions and integral transforms. Vector calculus. 3 HR. lee. 

338. Advanced Numerical Methods. 3 HR. PR: CHE 38 or consent. Methods for nonlinear alge- 
braic equations, methods for initial and boundary value ordinary differential equations, methods 
for parabolic, hyperbolic, and elliptical partial differential equations, numerical stability and meth- 
ods for stiff equations, optimization techniques. 3 HR. lee. 

344. Thermodynamics. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Logical development of thermodynamic principles. 
These are applied to selected topics including development and application of the phase rule, 
physical and chemical equilibria in complex systems, and nonideal solutions. Introduction to 
nonequalibrium thermodynamics. 3 HR. lee. 

345. Chemical Reaction Engineering. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Homogeneous and heterogeneous 
reaction systems, batch and flow ideal reactors, macro- and micro-mixing, non-ideal reactors, 
diffusion and reaction in porous catalysts, reactor stability analysis, special topics. 3 HR. lee. 

351. Fluidization Engineering. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Fundamentals of fluidization, two-phase flow 
theory and powder characteristics, structure and property of the emulsion phase and bubbles, 
mass- and heat-transfer in fluidized beds with and without chemical reaction. 3 HR. lee. 

352. Powder Technology. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Characterization of powders, structure of powders, 
powders in two-phase flow, measurement techniques, static and dynamic behavior of powders, 
grinding and agglomeration, chemistry of powders. 3 HR. lee. 

356. Polymer Rheology. 3 HR. Qualitative behavior of polymeric liquids; Rheometry; stress, strain 
and rate of strain tensors; Equations of motion; Hookean solids and Newtonian liquids, Liner 
viscoelasticity; constitutive equations for solutions and melts. 3 hr. lee. 

360. Corrosion Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CHE 142 or CHEM 141 or equivalent. Basic mechanisms 
of various types of corrosion such as galvanic corrosion, pitting corrosion and stress corrosion 
cracking; methods of corrosion prevention such as cathodic and anodic preventions, by using 
coatings and inhibitors and by selecting proper alloys. 3 HR. lee. 

274 WVU Graduate Catalog 



387. Materials Engineering. 3 HR. A study of materials engineering fundamentals emphasizing 
semiconductor, polymer, metal, and ceramic/cementitious material systems. Mechanical and physi- 
cal properties, theoretical aspects, testing, design criteria, manufacturing, and economics of ma- 
terial systems. Laboratory testing and evaluation. (Equivalent to CE 387, EE 387, EM 387, IMSE 
387, and MAE 387.) 3 HR. lee. 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly 
scheduled courses. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

400. Chemical Engineering Seminar. 1 -6 HR. Seminars on current research by visitors and graduate 
students. 

402. Advanced Fluid Dynamics. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Analysis of flow of fluids and transport of 
momentum and mechanical energy. Differential equations of fluid flow; potential flow, laminar 
boundary-layer theory, and non-Newtonian fluids. 3 HR. lee. 

404. Advanced Heat Transfer. 2-5 HR. PR: Consent. Theory of transport of thermal energy in 
solids and fluids as well as radiative transfer. Steady-state and transient conduction; heat transfer 
to flowing fluids; evaporation; boiling and condensation; packed-and fluid-bed heat transfer. 3 
HR. Lee. 

406. Advanced Mass Transfer. 2-5 HR. PR: Consent. Theory of diffusion, interphase mass-trans- 
fer theory, turbulent transport, simultaneous mass and heat transfer, mass transfer with chemical 
reaction, high mass-transfer rates, multicomponent macroscopic balances. 3 HR. lee. 

432. Optimization of Chemical Engineering Systems. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Optimization in engi- 
neering design, unconstrained optimization and differential calculus, equality-constraints optimi- 
zation, search technique, maximum principles, geometric and dynamic programming, linear and 
nonlinear programming, calculus of variations. 3 HR. lee. 

444. Applied Statistical and Molecular Thermodynamics. 3 HR. PR: CHE 344 and consent. The 
connection between microscopic phenomena (thermodynamics) and microscopic phenomena (sta- 
tistical and quantum mechanics). Thermodynamics modeling for process analysis. Equations of 
state, perturbation theories, mixing rules, computer simulation, group-contribution models, physi- 
cal-property prediction. 3 HR. lee. 

446. Catalysis. 3 HR. PR: CHE 345 or consent. Physical and chemical properties of catalytic 
solids, nature and theories of adsorption, thermodynamics of catalysis, theories of mass and 
energy transport, theoretical and experimental reaction rates, reactor design and optimization. 3 
HR. lee. 

447. Non-Catalytic Solid-Fluid Reactions. 3 HR. PR: CHE 345 or consent. Reaction models, pseudo- 
steady-state approximation, effectiveness factor, transport and chemical reaction properties, geo- 
metric, thermal and transitional instabilities, simultaneous multiple reactions, selectivities in fixed- 
, moving- and fluidized-bed reactor design. 3 HR. lee. 

480. Advanced Independent Study. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Designed to increase the depth of 
study in a specialized area of chemical engineering. 

491. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered in regu- 
larly scheduled courses. 

492. Directed Study 1-6 HR. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 



Chemical Engineering 275 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 

David Martinelli, Ph.D., Interim Chairperson 
623 Engineering Sciences Building 
e-mail: cee-info@cemr.wvu.edu 
web: http://www.cemr.wvu.edu/~wwwce/ 
Degrees Offered: 

Master of Science in Civil Engineering 

Master of Science in Engineering with a major in Civil Engineering 

Doctor of Philosophy with a major in Civil Engineering 

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers the master of science 
in civil engineering (M.S.C.E.). In conjunction with the College of Engineering and 
Mineral Resources, the master of science in engineering (M.S.E.), and the doctor of 
philosophy degrees are available with emphases in civil engineering. 

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering has a full-time faculty of 19, 
who are active in teaching, research, and professional commitments. 

Areas of Emphasis 

There are four major areas of interest of the faculty and graduate studies: 

• Environmental engineering and water resources, which include occupational health, 
solid-hazardous waste management and site remediation, water supply and pollu- 
tion, groundwater hydraulics, and hydrology. 

• Geotechnical, environmental geotechnology, and materials engineering, which cov- 
ers soil mechanics, foundations engineering, soil-structure interaction, groundwater 
and seepage, geosynthetics, contaminant transport, landfill design, and earthwork 
design, as well as construction materials and waste product utilization. 

• Transportation engineering, which includes transportation systems principles, 
design and planning, and expert systems. 

• Structural engineering, which involves work and study in advanced structural analy- 
sis, bridge engineering, building design, construction materials, and composite con- 
struction materials. 

Faculty 

With few exceptions, the members of the faculty are licensed professional engineers 
registered in one or more states and are involved in state, regional, and national profes- 
sional organizations, serving on numerous technical committees. They are successful 
researchers and have published extensively in technical journals. The civil engineering 
faculty produces graduates who can assume the problem solving, decision making, and 
technical leadership roles of a professional engineer and who have the sound educa- 
tional background for the continuing professional development the field requests. 

Students tailor their program of study to satisfy their own special interests, with guid- 
ance from a faculty advisor. Opportunities abound within the master's and doctoral 
tracks for a research experience which provides a chance for a student to tackle an 
engineering problem individually, with guidance from a faculty advisor. The graduate 
program in civil engineering was established with the aim of developing its students' 
abilities to use today's contemporary methods of engineering analysis and design to 
solve tomorrow's engineering problems. 

Application 

An application package can be obtained from the Graduate Program Director, Depart- 
ment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6103, 
Morgantown, WV 26506-6103. 

276 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Admission 

To be eligible for admission into the M.S.C.E. degree program, a candidate must hold 
or expect to receive a B.S.C.E. degree from either an accredited ABET curriculum or an 
internationally recognized program. Candidates with superior academic records and a 
baccalaureate degree in another engineering field, mathematics, or science may be eli- 
gible for admission into any of the masters programs offered by the department but will 
normally be required to attain a baccalaureate level of proficiency in certain engineering 
areas of the department. An engineering technology (non-calculus based) degree is 
not sufficient qualification for admission into any of the graduate programs of- 
fered by the department. 

To be eligible for admission into the Ph.D. degree program, a candidate must hold or 
expect to receive an M.S. degree in some discipline of engineering from an institution 
which has an ABET accredited undergraduate program in engineering or an internation- 
ally recognized program in engineering. 

The other requirements for admission into the graduate programs of the department 
are summarized as follows: 

• To be admitted as a regular graduate student, an applicant must have a grade-point 
average of 3.0 or better (out of a possible 4.0) in all previous college work and must 
meet all other requirements below. 

• The applicant must first submit, to the Office of Admissions and Records of West 
Virginia University, a completed application, application fee, and transcripts of all 
college work completed (directly from the institution). 

• Each applicant is required to have three reference letters (using standard forms 
available from the department) sent directly to the department; at least two of the 
three references should be from the institution the applicant last attended. 

• A minimum score of 550 on the TOEFL is required of all applicants from countries 
where the native language is not English. (Students who have completed a recent 
four year bachelor's degree in the USA need not submit these scores.) 

• All applicants who have not received their undergraduate degree in the United States 
are required to submit GRE General Test scores with the Engineering Subject Test 
score being optional. 

Provisional Admission An applicant who is not qualified for regular graduate student 
admission status, due either to insufficient grade-point average, incomplete credentials, 
or inadequate academic background, can be admitted as a provisional student. Require- 
ments for attaining regular student status must be stated in the letter of admission. Pro- 
visional students must sign a contract, which lists these requirements in detail, no later 
than their first registration. 

Program Outlines Students must comply with rules and regulations as outlined in the 
general requirements for graduate work. Each candidate will, with the approval and at 
the discretion of the graduate committee, follow a planned program which must conform 
to one of the following outlines: 

• A minimum of 30 semester credit hours, not more than six of which are in research 
leading to an acceptable thesis. 

• A minimum of 33 semester credit hours, not more than three of which are in re- 
search leading to an acceptable problem report. 

• A minimum of 36 semester credit hours, with no thesis or problem report required. 
No rigid curricula are prescribed for the degrees of master of science in civil engineering 

and master of science in engineering. Graduate-level work in mathematics, mechanics, or 
other appropriate areas of science is customary; however, at least 15 semester hours of 
credit should normally be selected from graduate civil engineering courses. 

Civil and Environmental Engineering 277 



Thesis A thesis or problem is normally required of all candidates. While required credit in 
research (C E 497) is devoted to the thesis or report preparation, the thesis or problem 
report is not automatically approved after the required number of semester hours of 
research work have been completed. The thesis or problem report must conform with the 
general WVU requirements for graduate study and with any additional requirements es- 
tablished by the department. 

Examinations A candidate shall be required to pass an examination which may be 
written or oral or both, to be administered by the student's advisory and examining 
committee. The examination shall cover course material and the thesis or problem 
report, depending upon the program followed. 

Approval for the M.S.C.E. degree is restricted to those holding a baccalaureate de- 
gree in civil engineering. 

Master of Science in Engineering 

The master of science in engineering program is available to students approved for 
the graduate program who possess a baccalaureate degree in a technical area other 
than civil engineering. Students entering this graduate program must complete appropri- 
ate undergraduate work as specified by departmental regulations. This degree program 
is administered by the College of Engineering and Mineral Resources; the program may 
emphasize civil engineering. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The doctor of philosophy degree is administered through the College's interdiscipli- 
nary program; civil engineering may be the major. A candidate for the degree of doctor of 
philosophy must comply with the rules and regulations outlined in the general require- 
ments of the College of Engineering and Mineral Resources. The research work for the 
doctoral dissertation must show a high degree of originality on the part of the student and 
must constitute an original contribution to the art and science of civil engineering. 

Civil Engineering (C E) 

201 . Principles of Boundary Surveying. 3 HR. PR: CE 105 or consent. A study of the retacement 
requirements for a metes and bounds survey system. The study will include the interpretation and 
writing of property descriptions, legal principles related to boundary establishment, and analytical 
approaches to boundary location. 3 HR. lee. 

212. Concrete and Aggregates. 3 HR. PR: CE 110 or consent. Considerations and methods for 
the design of concrete mixes. Properties of portland cement and aggregates and their influence 
on the design and performance of concrete mixtures. Testing of concrete and aggregate and the 
significance of these tests. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

213. Construction Methods. 3 HR. PR: Junior or senior standing in civil engineering. Study of 
construction methods, equipment, and administration with particular emphasis on the influence of 
new developments in technology. 3 HR. lee. 

220. Computational Fluid Mechanics. 3 HR. PR: CE 121 and ENGR 2 or consent. Use of the 
computer in elementary hydraulics, open channel flow, potential flow, and boundary layer flow, 
numerical techniques for solution of algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, and par- 
tial differential equations. 3 HR. lee. 

225. Engineering Hydrology. II. 3 HR. PR: CE 121 or consent. Scientific basis of the hydrologic 
cycle and its engineering implications; rainfall-runoff process, hydrographs, flood routing, and 
statistical methods. 3 HR. lee. 

227. Water Resources Engineering. II. 3 HR. PR: CE 225. Application of hydrologic and hydraulic 
principles in the design and analysis of water resource systems; probability concepts and eco- 
nomics in water resource planning, water law, reservoir operations, hydraulic structures, flood- 
damage mitigation, hydroelectric power, and drainage. 3 HR. lee. 

278 WVU Graduate Catalog 



231. Highway Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CE 132 and CE 181. Highway administration, economics 
and finance; planning and design; subgrade soils and drainage; construction and maintenance. 
Design of a highway. Center-line and grade-line projections, earthwork and cost estimate. 2 HR. 
lee, 3 HR. lab. 

233. Urban Transportation Planning and Design. 3 HR. PR: CE 132 or consent. Principles of 
planning and physical design of transportation systems for different parts of the urban area. Land 
use, social, economic, and environmental compatibilities are emphasized. Evaluation and impact 
assessment. 

235. Railway Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CE 105. Development and importance of the railroad indus- 
try. Location, construction, operation, and maintenance. 3 HR. lee. 

243. Environmental Science and Technology. I. 3 HR. PR: Engineering major. Issues of global 
atmospheric changes, minimization and control of hazardous wastes, groundwater contamina- 
tion, water pollution, air pollution, solid waste control, and management of water and energy 
resources. 3 HR. lee. 

245. Properties of Air Pollutants. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Physical, chemical, and biological behav- 
ioral properties of dusts, droplets, and gases in the atmosphere. Air pollutant sampling and analy- 
sis. Planning and operating air pollution surveys. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

247. Environmental Engineering Design. I. 3 HR. PR: CE 147. Process design of treatment/reme- 
diation systems; comparison of alternatives and preliminary cost evaluation. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

251. Public Health Engineering. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Engineering aspects involved in control of 
the environment for protection of health and promotion of comfort of humans. Communicable 
disease control, milk and food sanitation, air pollution, refuse disposal, industrial hygiene, and 
radiological health hazards. 3 HR. lee. 

261. Structural Analysis 2. I, II. 3 HR. PR: CE 161 or consent. Fundamental theory of statically 
indeterminate structures; analysis of indeterminate beams, frames, and trusses by stiffness and 
flexibility methods; study of influence lines for beams, frames, and trusses. 3 HR. lee. 

270. Reinforced Concrete Design. 3 HR. PR: CE 110 and CE 161 . Behavior and design of rein- 
forced concrete members. Material properties; design methods and safety consideration; flexure; 
shear; bond and anchorage; combined flexure and axial load; footings; introduction to torsion, 
slender columns, and prestressed concrete. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

271. Steel Design. 3 HR. PR: CE 110 and CE 161. Design of steel bridge and building systems 
with emphasis on connections, beams, columns, plastic design, and cost estimates. 3 HR. lee 

274. Timber Design. 3 HR. PR: CE 110 and CE 161. Fundamentals of modern timber design and 
analysis. Topics include wood properties, design of beams, columns, trusses, and pole structures 
using dimension lumber, glue-laminated products, and plywood. 3 HR. lee 

275. Transportation Systems Rehabilitation and Maintenance. 3 HR. Introduction to rehabilitation 
and maintenance of transportation infrastructure; definitions, issues and problems; environmen- 
tal impact, pavement and bridge maintenance and rehabilitation methods with special consider- 
ation of stability, scour, and subsidence. 3 HR. lee 

276. Conceptual Design of Structures. I. 3 HR. PR: CE 161 or consent. Classification, function, 
and conceptual analytical understanding of structural systems and components; design codes 
and modeling of loads; behavior of components and systems; design principles of structural sys- 
tems. 3 HR. lee 

281 . Foundation Engineering. I, II. 3 HR. PR: CE 181 . Subsurface investigations and synthesis of 
soil parameters for geotechnical design and analysis, concepts of shallow and deep foundation 
design, geotechnical design of conventional retaining walls, computerized analysis and design of 
soil/foundation interaction; case histories. 3 HR. lee 

283. Earthwork Design. 3 HR. PR: CE 181. Use of soil mechanics principles in the analysis, 
design and construction of earth structures. Principles of compaction and compaction control; an 
introduction to slope stability analysis and landslides; earth reinforcement systems, and ground 
improvement techniques. 3 HR. lee 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 279 



284. Geotechnical Engineering Field Methods. II. 3 HR. PR: CE 181 . Soil exploration and ground- 
water sampling; in-situ determination of properties using the split spoon, cone, dilatometer, 
pressuremeter, and vane equipment. Instrumentation for monitoring field performance and chal- 
lenges associated with exploration and monitoring in geotechnical/geoenvironmental engineer- 
ing. 3 HR. lee. 

290. Civil Engineering Problems. 1-6 HR. PR: Junior or senior standing. Special topics in various 
aspects of civil engineering analysis, design, and construction. 

311. Pavement Design. 3 HR. PR: CE 281 or consent. Effects of traffic, soil, environment, and 
loads on the design and behavior of pavement systems. Design of pavement systems. Consider- 
ation of drainage and climate. Pavement performance and performance surveys. 3 HR. rec. 

320. Groundwater Dynamics. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Introduction to groundwater, formulation of 
equations for saturated and unsaturated flow, analytical solutions for steady and transient cases, 
transport of pollutants and numerical techniques. 3 HR. rec. 

322. Free Surface Hydrodynamics. I. 3 HR. PR: CE 122 or consent. The dynamics of liquid flow 
with a free surface under the influence of gravity; open channel hydraulics, wave motion, and 
buoyancy effects. 3 HR. lee. 

328. Groundwater Contaminant Transport. I. 3 HR. PR: CE 320. Solute and particle transport; 
aqueous geochemistry; mathematics of mass transport; transformation; retardation, and attenua- 
tion of solutes; modeling contaminant transport and remediation. 3 HR. lee. (Every third year.) 

332. Airport Planning and Design. 3 HR. PR: CE 132 or consent. Financing, air travel demand 
modeling, aircraft trends, traffic control, site selection, ground access, noise control, geometric 
design, pavement design, terminal facilities. 3 HR. rec. 

333. Geometric Design of Highways. 3 HR. PR: Consent. The theory and practice of geometric 
design of modern highways. Horizontal and vertical alignment, cross-slope, design speed, slight 
distances, interchanges, and intersections. Critical analysis of design specifications. 2 HR. lee, 
3HR. lab. 

334. Introduction to Traffic Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CE 132 or consent. The purpose, scope, and 
methods of traffic engineering. Emphasis on the three basic elements of each element and inter- 
actions between the elements. Laboratory devoted to conducting simple traffic studies, solving 
practical problems, and designing traffic facilities. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

336. Highway Planning. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Theory and practice of highway investment decision- 
making with emphasis on quantitative techniques of traffic assignment and travel demand fore- 
casting, system evaluation, establishing priorities and programming. Both rural and urban 
highway systems are considered. 3 HR. rec. 

337. Public Transportation Engineering. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Design of rail and highway models 
for urban and rural areas. Consideration of vehicle technology, facility and route design, conven- 
tional and paratransit services, and related marketing, finance and coordination issues. 3 HR. 
rec. 

338. Highway Safety Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CE 231 or consent. Relationship between human, 
vehicular, and roadway factors which impact safety; functional requirements of highway safety 
features; legal aspects; accident analysis; evaluation of highway safety projects. 3 HR. rec. 

339. Traffic Engineering Operations. 3 HR. PR: CE 334. Theory and practice of application of 
traffic engineering regulations; traffic control concepts for urban street systems and freeways; 
freeway surveillance and incident management; driver information systems; traffic control system 
technology and management. 3 HR. rec. 

349. Solid Waste Disposal. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Patterns and problems of solid waste storage, 
transport, and disposal. Examinations of various engineering alternatives with appropriate con- 
sideration for air and water pollution control and land reclamation. Analytical approaches to re- 
covery and reuse of materials. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

350. Sanitary Chemistry and Biology. 3 HR. PR: CE 122 or consent. Study of physical and chemi- 
cal properties of water. Theory and methods of chemical analysis of water, sewage, and industrial 
wastes. Biological aspects of stream pollution problems. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

280 WVU Graduate Catalog 



356. Principles of Biological Waste Treatment. 3 HR. PR: CE 350 or consent. Examination of 
biological treatment systems related to microbiology and function. Models used to describe sys- 
tem behavior and kinetics are developed. Laboratory and field experiments are performed to 
understand the relation between operation and design. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

361 . Statically Indeterminate Structures. 3 HR. PR: CE 261 or consent. Force and displacement meth- 
ods of analysis; energy principles and their application to trusses, frames, and grids; effects of axial 
forces; influence lines for frames, arches, and trusses; secondary stress analysis. 3 HR. rec. 

363. Introduction to Structural Dynamics. 3 HR. PR: CE 361 or CE 460. General theory for dy- 
namic response of systems having one or several degrees of freedom. Emphasis on the applica- 
tion of dynamic response theory to structural design. 3 HR. rec. 

364. Nondestructive Material and Structural Evaluations. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Nondestructive 
evaluation (NDE) using techniques based on mechanical and electromagnetic wave propagation; 
theory and applications of various NDE techniques including infrared thermography, dynamic 
characterization, seismic reflection and refraction, ultrasonics, acoustic emission, and radar. 3 
HR. lee. 

366. Advanced Materials for Infrastructure. I. 3 HR. PR: CE 270 and CE 271. Introduction to 
principles of material science; material structure, characterization at coupon and component level, 
practical information on fiber reinforced shapes; establishment of failure analysis and standard- 
ization. 3 HR. lee. 

373. Prestressed Concrete. 3 HR. PR: CE 261 and CE 270 or consent. Behavior and design of 
prestressed concrete members. Materials, bending, shear, torsion, methods of prestressing, pre- 
stress losses, deflections, compression members, composite members, indeterminate structures. 
3 HR. rec. 

380. Soil Properties and Behavior. 3 HR. PR: CE 281 or consent. Soil mineralogy and the physi- 
cochemical properties of soils and their application to an understanding of permeability, consoli- 
dation, shear strength, and compaction. Prediction of engineering behavior of soils in light of 
physicochemical concepts. 3 HR. rec. 

381. So/7 Testing. 3 HR. PR: CE 181 or consent. Experimental evaluation of soil properties and 
behavior. Emphasis is placed on the proper interpretation of experimental results and application 
of such results to practical problems. 1 HR. lee, 6 HR. lab. 

382. The Finite Element Method. II. 3 HR. PR: Graduate standing in CE or MAE or consent. 
Introductory treatment of theoretical basis of finite element method, mathematical formulation, 
different types of elements, stress analysis in solids, applications, and computer implementation. 

385. Airphoto Interpretation. 3 HR. Study of techniques for obtaining qualitive information con- 
cerning type and engineering characteristics of surficial materials. Use of airphoto interpretation 
for evaluation of engineering problems encountered in design and location of engineering facili- 
ties. 3 HR. rec. 

387. Materials Engineering. 3 HR. A study of materials engineering fundamentals emphasizing 
semiconductor, polymer, metal, and ceramic/cementitious material systems. Mechanical and physi- 
cal properties, theoretical aspects, testing, design criteria, manufacturing, and economics of ma- 
terial systems. Laboratory testing and evaluation. (Equivalent to CHE 387, EE 387, EM 387, 
IMSE 387, and MAE 387.) 

391. Advanced Topics. 1-6 HR. 

393. Advanced Finite Element Methods. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Formulation procedures and appli- 
cations of finite element methods to two-and three-dimensional problems, techniques for nonlin- 
ear analysis computer implementation; applications in field problems, flow, and dynamics. 

397. Research. 1-15 HR. 

421. Environmental Fluid Mechanics. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Equations of motion including buoy- 
ancy and Coriolis force; mechanics of jets and plumes; diffusion, dispersion, and mixing in rivers, 
lakes, reservoirs, and estuaries. 3 HR. lee. (Every third year.) 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 281 



427. Wastewater System Conveyance. I. 3 HR. PR: CE 122 or equivalent, or consent. Water and 
wastewater flows and measurement, design of water transportation systems, design of gravity- 
flow sanitary sewers and stormwater drainage systems, pumps and pump systems, and design of 
pumping stations. 3 HR. lee. 

432. Transportation Systems Analysis. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Systematic examination of the inter- 
action between transport technology, activity systems, and traffic flows. Quantitative analysis of 
the relationship among vehicle cycles, networks, congestion, choice behavior, cost functions, and 
resulting travel-market equilibration. 3 HR. rec. 

440. Deterministic Hydrology. 3 HR. PR: Consent. An in-depth treatment of the dynamics of the 
accumulation of runoff, including the formulation of the unsteady surface flow equations and the 
unsteady saturated-unsaturated subsurface flow equations. Both analytical and numerical solu- 
tions are presented with applications. 3 HR. rec. 

441. Stochastic Hydrology. 3 HR. PR: Consent. The use of probabilistic and random processes 
techniques in the study of hydrologic problems, including multivariate time series and frequency- 
domain analyses of hydrologic data, and stochastic modeling of multidimensional hydrologic pro- 
cesses. 3 HR. rec. 

450. Environmental Systems Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CE 252 or consent. Mathematical and com- 
puter modeling of environmental systems with emphasis on decision-making; applications will be 
selected from some or all of the following areas: water quality, water resources planning, solid 
waste management, waste treatment. 3 HR. rec. 

452. Water Treatment Theory. 3 HR. PR: CE 350. Theory of various procedures and techniques 
utilized in treatment of water for municipal and industrial use. Review of water quality criteria. 
Design of water purification facilities. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

454. Industrial and Advanced Waste Treatment. 3 HR. PR or Cone: CE 350 or consent. Basis 
physical and chemical unit operations used in industrial and advanced waste treatment; applica- 
tions for waste water reclamation and reuse; study of industrial wastes from standpoint of pro- 
cess, source, and treatment. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

458. Design of Sanitary Works. 3 HR. PR: CE 121 . Water supply and waste water disposal prob- 
lems. Design of treatment facilities. 2 HR. lee, 3 HR. lab. 

460. Finite Element Methods in Structural Analysis. 3 HR. PR: CE 361 or consent. Relationships 
of elasticity theory; definitions and basic element operations; direct and variational methods of 
triangular and rectangular elements related to plane stress, plane strain, and flat plates in bend- 
ing; variational principles in global analysis. 3 HR. rec. 

461 . Bridge Engineering. 3 HR. PR: CE 361 or consent. Statically indeterminate trusses, continu- 
ous trusses; steel and concrete arches; long-span and suspension bridges; secondary stresses. 
3 HR. rec. 

462. Numerical Analysis of Engineering Systems. 3 HR. PR: CE 361 or consent. Numerical meth- 
ods for the solution of equilibrium, eigenvalue and propagation problems of discrete and continu- 
ous structural systems with special emphasis on weighted residual techniques. 3 HR. rec. 

470. Behavior of Steel Members. 3 HR. PR: CE 271 or consent. Elastic behavior of steel 
members subjected to axial load, bending, and torsion. Elastic and inelastic response of beams, 
columns, and beam-columns to load and the resulting design implications. Comparison with 
standard steel codes and specifications. 3 HR. rec. 

471 . Light Gage Metal Design. 3 HR. PR: CE 261 and CE 271 or consent. Analysis and design of 
light gage material systems; flexural and compression members design; investigations into post 
buckling strength and optimum weight systems. 3 HR. rec. 

473. Structural Design for Dynamic Loads. 3 HR. PR: CE 363 or consent. Nature of dynamic 
loading caused by earthquakes and nuclear weapons blasts; nature of dynamic resistance of 
structural elements and structural systems; criteria for design of blast-resistance and earthquake 
resistant structures; simplified and approximate design methods. 3 HR. rec. 



282 WVU Graduate Catalog 



475. Analysis and Design of Multistory Structures. 3 HR. (May be repeated once.) PR: CE 363 
and CE 270 or CE 271. Introduction; service, structural and construction systems; analysis and 
design for lateral and gravity forces; structural modeling; computer applications; approximate 
methods; connections; foundations; review of standard building codes; special topics. 3 HR. rec. 

476. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Members. 3 HR. PR: CE 270 or consent. Studies of actual 
member behavior; members in flexure, combined flexure, shear, and torsion; bond and anchor- 
age; combined axial load and flexure; slender columns; deep beams; derivation of current code 
provisions. 3 HR. rec. 

481. Advanced Mechanics of Soils. 3 HR. PR: CE 181 and CE 381 and MAE 318 or consent. 
Stress invariants, stress history and stress path, elastic and quasi-elastic models for soils; soil 
plasticity, failure theories for soils; critical state soil mechanics, and determination of construction 
parameters. 3 HR. lee. 

482. Advanced Foundation Analysis. 3 HR. PR: CE 281 or consent. Study of soil-structure inter- 
action. Applications of principles of soil mechanics and numerical methods for analysis and 
design of geotechnical structures: strip footings, axially and laterally loaded piles, braced excava- 
tions, sheet pile walls, tunnel lining, and buried pipes and culverts. 3 HR. rec. 

483. Advanced Earthwork Design. 3 HR. PR: CE 283 or consent. Application of the principles of 
theoretical soil mechanics to the design of embankments of earth and rock. In-depth study of 
compaction theory, stability of natural and man-made slopes by limit equilibrium and deformation 
considerations. 3 HR. rec. 

484. Groundwater and Seepage. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Flow of groundwater through soils and its 
application to the design of highways and dams and to construction operations. Emphasis is 
placed on both the analytical and classical flow net techniques for solving seepage problems. 3 
HR. rec. 

485. Geotechnical Risk Assessment. 3 HR. PR: CE 281 and CE 283 or consent. Application of 
problaistic and statistical principles to geotechnical analysis and design. Random spatial variabil- 
ity of soil properties; decision under uncertainty; reliability of geotechnical structures. 3 HR. rec. 

486. Soil Dynamics. 3 HR. PR: CE 380 and consent. Consideration of the simple damped oscilla- 
tor, wave propagation in elastic media, dynamic field and laboratory tests, dynamic soil proper- 
ties, and foundation vibrations. Introduction to geotechnical aspects of earthquake engineering. 3 
HR. rec. 

488. Geotechnical Case Histories. 3 HR. PR: CE 281 and CE 283 or consent. Application of the 
principles of geotechnical engineering to professional practice as taught through the case histo- 
ries approach. Study of actual problems in geotechnical engineering and their solutions. 3 HR. 
rec. 

491. Advanced Study. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigations in advanced subjects which are not 
covered in regularly scheduled courses. Study may be independent or through specially sched- 
uled lectures. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. PR: Consent. Each graduate student will present at least one 
seminar to the assembled faculty and graduate student body of the student's program. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

498. Thesis. 2-4 HR. PR: Consent. 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 283 



Computer Science and Electrical Engineering 

Lawrence A. Hornak, Ph.D., Co-Interim Chairperson 

James D. Mooney, Ph.D., Co-Interim Chairperson 

John M. Atkins, Ph.D., Computer Science Graduate Coordinator 

Wils L. Cooley, Ph.D., Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Coordinator 

823 Engineering Science Building 

e-mail: csee-info@cemr.wvu.edu 

web: http://www.csee.wvu.edu/ 

Degrees Offered: 
Master of Science in Computer Science 
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 

Master of Science in Engineering with a major in Computer Engineering 
Master of Science in Engineering with a major in Electrical Engineering 
Master of Science in Software Engineering 
Doctor of Philosophy with a major in Computer Engineering 
Doctor of Philosophy with a major in Electrical Engineering 
Doctor of Philosophy with emphasis in Computer and Information Sciences 

Faculty 

The Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, with 31 faculty 
members, 360 undergraduate students, and 162 graduate students, offers an excellent 
graduate program. Faculty members in the department have diverse and extensive 
expertise in industry, research, and graduate instruction, providing opportunities for 
students to pursue graduate study in either theory-oriented or application-oriented fields. 

Facilities and Centers 

The department has its primary office, instructional lab, and research lab space on 
four floors of the Engineering Sciences Building and one floor of the Engineering Re- 
search Building on the Evansdale Campus and one floor of both the Eiesland and 
Armstrong Halls on the Downtown Campus. The department also has research activi- 
ties and facilities at the NASA IV&V Center and the Alan B. Mollohan Innovation Center 
of the West Virginia High-Tech Consortium Foundation in Fairmont, WV. The research 
facilities of the department constitute a rich and diverse resource which spans the needs 
of research and graduate education in computer science, computer engineering, and 
electrical engineering. Laboratories and Centers include the Software Research Labo- 
ratory (SRL), the Reusable Software Research Group, the Institute of Combinatorial 
Computing and Discrete Mathematics (jointly with the Department of Mathematics), the 
Lab for Advanced Information and Computation Systems (LAICS), the Computer-Aided 
Lumber processing Lab, the ElectroMechanical Systems Lab (EMSL), and the Power 
Control Systems Lab. The Microelectronic Systems Research Center (MSRC) is part of 
the department and affiliated with the LAICS. MSRC facilities include a microsystem 
fabrication lab, photonic systems lab, systems prototyping lab with CAE/CAD tool suites 
and workstation cluster, electronic systems test (device through systems), surface mount 
multilayer PCB fab, and system testbed development facility. Department faculty serve 
as the primary leadership and technical staff for the Concurrent Engineering Research 
Center (CERC) and the Institute for Software Research (ISR), both of which are univer- 
sity research units. 

Computing Facilities 

All graduate students have access to a broad variety of computing platforms for both 
class work and research. The Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engi- 
neering operates and maintains a variety of dedicated computer systems, clusters, and 
networks supporting both the instructional and research activities of the department. 

284 WVU Graduate Catalog 



These systems include numerous SUN UNIX workstation clusters as well as PC and 
Macintosh workstations. The department also maintains a SGI Origin 2000 six node 
parallel computer and has access to the WVU CM-5 Parallel Computer. An additional 
laboratory by Hewlett-Packard supports large databases and medical informatics. Stu- 
dents have access to a rich set of software packages and tool suites available either on 
department systems or the College of Engineering and Mineral Resources. All depart- 
ment, college, and university computing resources are fully networked via ETHERNET 
and FDDI with a campus wide ATM backbone being implemented enabling interface to 
the statewide ATM network. All computing systems have INTERNET access enabling 
worldwide connectivity and access to several additional computing services via the 
Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. The University is also a member of INTERNET2, 
vBNS, and SURANET, of which faculty in the department are active participants. 

Areas of Research 

The department is enthusiastically and vigorously involved in research, technical publi- 
cation, and graduate instruction at the forefront of the field. The areas of emphasis are: 

• Theory of computation, including foundations, complexity, algorithm analysis, par- 
allelism, and graph theory. 

• Computer systems, including microprocessor applications, advanced computer ar- 
chitecture, neural networks, fuzzy logic, parallel processing, VLSI testing tech- 
niques, fault tolerant design, software metrics, and software engineering. 

• Control systems, including classical and modern control theory and applications. 

• Communications and signal processing, including computer networks and image 
processing systems. 

• Electric power systems and power electronics, including stability and control, tran- 
sients, and steady state analysis, real time control, protection, electric machines, 
drives, and advanced motion controllers, electric and hybrid electric vehicles. 

• Microelectronic and Photonic Systems, including integrated circuit devices, VLSI, 
optoelectronics, high performance packaging, and microfabrication. 

• Software Engineering, including reuse and portability, verification and validation, 
language issues, and user interface issues. 

Theory of Computation 

Research in the theory of computation covers a variety of areas ranging from founda- 
tional mathematics to analysis of the performance of algorithms. A core of faculty per- 
forms research in areas such as graph theory, topology, and discrete mathematics, 
partly in connection with the Institute of Combinatorial Computing and Discrete Math- 
ematics. Another key area of interest is the development and analysis of algorithms, 
especially those suited for parallel and distributed systems. 

Software Engineering 

Software engineering is concerned with applying sound engineering principles to the 
design, development and maintenance of computer software. There is a long tradition 
of software engineering education and research in the computer science program at 
WVU. Some of this work has been in partnership with the Software Engineering Insti- 
tute in Pittsburgh, NASA, DoD and other government agencies, and a variety of area 
industries. A more recent partnership has been formed with the Institute for Software 
Research at the West Virginia High-Tech Consortium. A major research program is 
located at the NASA Independent Verification and Validation facility in Fairmont, where 
faculty work on improving the reliability of mission-critical software systems such as 
those that control space missions. Extensive software engineering research is carried 
out by CSEE facility at the Concurrent Engineering Research Center in areas such as 
manufacturing and health care systems. Other faculty have worked with government 
agencies to develop software engineering capabilities and environments based on the 



Computer Science and Electrical Engineering 285 



Ada language, and to explore issues of software reuse and software portability. An- 
other key area is the development of effective user interface, including those intended 
for scientific visualization. Graduate courses in computer science address a wide vari- 
ety of software engineering topics, such as those outlined above, and a new graduate 
program in software engineering further develops our strength in this area. 

Computer Systems 

Computer systems is a very broad area, covering hardware, firmware, and software 
components of complex digital systems and system components. Software and hard- 
ware systems design are among the most technologically intensive components of the 
CSEE curricula. A large selection of hardware and software graduate courses are of- 
fered in this category. These cover topics such as switching theory, digital communica- 
tion systems, VLSI design and testing, fault-tolerant computing, computer architecture, 
neural networks, applied fuzzy logic, and real-time software design and development. 
Graduate students are encouraged to include courses in their programs of study from 
across the spectrum of disciplines in the department. A broad spectrum of research 
topics of both applied and theoretical nature are undertaken under this heading. Some 
examples are: software development environments for signal processing applications, 
parallel processing of fingerprint image comparison systems, fast adaptive routing al- 
gorithms for processor arrays, communication switching systems, information systems, 
computational accelerator using digital signal processing arrays, an automated lumber 
processing system, neural network medical and industrial applications, autonomous 
robotics, computer controlled electric and hybrid vehicle instrumentation, a distributed 
microprocessor monitoring system, knowledge-based decision support system, and 
microprocessor-based instrumentation. The department offers dedicated laboratories 
equipped with personal computers and workstations to support classroom instruction 
and research. A number of faculty have close cooperation with several interdisciplinary 
research centers at WVU such as the Concurrent Engineering Research Center, the 
Alternate Fuel Research Center, and the Constructed Facility Research Center. 

Control Systems 

The study of control systems is highly mathematical with a broad range of applica- 
tions. This subject area interests those who wish to apply technology to the control of 
dynamical systems, for which signals from sensors, usually processed by a computer, 
are necessary. Consequently, the student interested in control systems will also take 
course work in computer systems and digital signal processing. The graduate curricu- 
lum in control and systems engineering consists of courses in both classical and mod- 
ern control theory and applications, including modeling techniques in both the frequency 
and time domains for continuous and discrete time systems, optimal control, digital 
control, and estimation theory; classical techniques for control systems and design 
tools such as root locus, Nyquist, and Bode methods for linear time-variant systems 
are also included. Additional courses are available in adaptive control, large scale sys- 
tems, and stochastic control. Currently, the faculty in control systems are actively in- 
volved in a number of research areas, including both sponsored and unsponsored 
research activities, with some projects relating to specific applications and some being 
of a theoretical nature and having a wide range of applications. Research projects in 
control and systems engineering include: research in large scale systems, design of 
fast-estimation algorithms for distributed systems, reduced-order systems design, 
application of H-infinity methods, nonlinear systems control, deconvolution methods 
for seismic signal processing, and application of control theory to power systems and 
communications. 

Faculty research in the control area currently is sponsored by the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Energy, the National Science Foundation, the state of West Virginia, and 
private organizations. 



286 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Communications/Signal Processing 

Communications and signal processing, though distinct topics, are alike in many 
ways. Communications has evolved rapidly from the basic voice telephone service to a 
rich set of communications systems carrying voice, data, video, and other information. 
The integration of computers with communications systems has enabled powerful in- 
formation systems for a wide range of applications such as health care and the world 
wide web. Advances in signal processing theory, physical technologies, and powerful 
digital signal processors (DSPs) have combined to dramatically expand the applica- 
tions of signal processing. 

Research activities address the primary areas of theory, technology, and applica- 
tions. Research in communications theory explores new principles for higher perfor- 
mance or improved analysis of communications systems. Signal processing theory re- 
search explores new principles for the understanding and manipulation of analog and 
digital signals. These theoretical foundations drive a wide range of applied research. 
Projects include state space approaches to adaptive equalization and optimal and ro- 
bust receivers for CDMA. Research on technologies extends from basic devices through 
full testbed systems. Projects include photonics and high speed electronics for optical 
communications, advanced system packaging and interconnections for high perfor- 
mance systems, and parallel DSP arrays. Applications research includes information 
systems which integrate computing and communications for distance education, dis- 
tance collaborations, medical informatics and other information-age applications. Im- 
age processing applications in areas such as pattern matching, medical imaging, and 
inspection systems are also investigated. The department serves as the focal point for 
the NSF Medical Imaging and Image Processing Research Cluster at WVU. 

Electrical Power Systems 

Electrical power systems historically have been an area of emphasis in the electrical 
engineering curriculum, and the graduate program in power systems at WVU is ma- 
ture. Five graduate courses are offered on a regular basis. In addition, there are four 
senior elective/graduate courses: distribution, industrial power systems, power elec- 
tronics, and advanced power systems analysis. Recent and current research activities 
include: reliability, grounding, transmission, electric transportation, modeling, stability 
analysis, optimal design, design of modulation controllers for multiterminal ac/dc power 
systems, electric drives, electric machines, advanced motion control systems, and power 
electronics. Externally funded projects include: robust design of modulation controllers 
for flexible ac/dc transmission lines, optimal design of permanent magnet brushless 
machines, spacecraft power storage controllers, investigation of voltage/current char- 
acteristics of MOS-controlled thyristors with static and dynamic loads, and identifica- 
tion and decentralized control of critical modes. These projects provide excellent 
support for both graduate student and faculty research. Extensive interaction with 
industry provides ample opportunity for direct contact with practitioners in the field. 

Microelectronic and Photonic Systems 

Electronic and photonic systems are advancing at a dramatic rate, enabling a wide 
variety of new systems ranging from consumer applications through large scale sys- 
tems. Courses are offered in advanced circuit analysis, integrated circuits (both analog 
and digital), noise and grounding, power electronics, VLSI design, microsystem fabri- 
cation, and photonics. The research program is a "systems-integration" approach based 
on exploring advances in a wide range of topics contributing to advanced electronic 
and photonic systems. Research topics in devices and components include sensor, 
nano-scale structures and devices, MCTs micro-electromechanical and micro-machined 
components, advanced multichip module packaging, optical interconnections, optical 
waveguides and diffractive optics, integrated optics, and VLSI circuits. Research also 
draws on combinations of the above components to achieve novel system functions. 
Such research efforts include electronic instrumentation and control and capacitive robotic 
sensor systems. Systems research explores high performance system testbeds including 

Computer Science and Electrical Engineering 287 



parallel arrays of high performance digital signal processors for computational accelera- 
tors. Much of this research is supported by the facilities of the Microelectronic Systems 
Research Center (http://msrc.wvu.edu) and Lab for Advanced Information and Computa- 
tion Systems. Representative applications include communications, parallel computing, 
sensor-based systems, and signal/image processing. Several faculty are also engaged in 
cooperative interdisciplinary research projects, including projects with materials and device 
research in the departments of Physics and Chemical Engineering and in the Health 
Sciences Center. 

Programs 

The Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering offers programs 
leading to the master of science in computer science (M.S.C.S.), the master of science 
in electrical engineering (M.S.E.E.), and the master of science in software engineering 
(M.S.S.E.). It also offers the doctor of philosophy in computer and information sciences 
and participates in the College of Engineering and Mineral Resources interdisciplinary 
program offering the master of science in engineering (M.S.E.) and the doctor of phi- 
losophy (Ph.D.), both with specialization in electrical engineering or computer engi- 
neering. Master of science students must comply with the rules for master's degrees as 
set forth by both the college in the Guidelines for Masters Degree Programs Offered in 
the College of Engineering and Mineral Resources and by the department in the Mas- 
ter of Science Program Guidelines. Doctor of philosophy students must comply with 
the rules set forth by both the college in The College of Engineering and Mineral Re- 
sources Doctor of Philosophy Program Guidelines and the department in the Doctor of 
Philosophy Program Guidelines. 

Master of Science in Computer Science 

The master's degree is intended to qualify the student to assume a professional role 
in an educational, industrial, or governmental research project, teach in a junior or 
senior college, or undertake advanced training toward a doctorate in computer sci- 
ence. Because many students receive baccalaureate degrees from colleges which do 
not offer undergraduate programs in computer science, a student with an outstanding 
undergraduate record does not need a degree in computer science to enter the master's 
program. 

Admission Requirements 

Applications from students eligible for admission as regular graduate students and 
from foreign students are normally evaluated during January for admission to the sum- 
mer session. Graduate Record Examination general test scores are required for 
admission into the master's program. 

An applicant for admission to the master's degree program is expected to satisfy the 
following requirements for regular admission: 

• A bachelor's degree in computer science, equivalent to that offered by this depart- 
ment, from an accredited college or university. 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; 

• At least a 3.0 GPA on all computer science, statistics, and mathematics work; 

• A GRE score of at least the 50th percentile on the verbal, quantitative, and analyti- 
cal components. 

Applicants for admission to the master's degree program who do not satisfy the crite- 
ria for regular admission will be granted provisional admission if they meet the following 
conditions: 

• A minimum of 50th percentile on the quantitative and analytical components of the 
GRE; 

• A cumulative GPA between 2.5 and 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; 

• A cumulative GPA between 2.5 and 3.0 on all computer science, mathematics, and 
statistics course work undertaken. 

288 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Students admitted provisionally must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 on all course 
work attempted. 

Applicants who do not meet the minimum criteria for admission may enroll as non- 
degree students and then apply for provisional admission when the criteria for provi- 
sional admission have been met. 

Students admitted to the master's program who do not have an equivalent bachelor's 
degree in computer science may be required to enroll in one or more courses that 
represent deficiencies in their undergraduate curriculum. Students are minimally ex- 
pected to know the material contained in the following courses: 

• One year of calculus (MATH 15 and 16 or equivalent) and one semester of statis- 
tics (STAT 201 or equivalent). 

• Documented knowledge of a high-level programming language such as Ada, C, 
C++, Java, or Pascal (CS 15, 16, and 76, or equivalent). 

• Assembler language and computer organization (CS 56 or equivalent). 

• Discrete mathematics (CS 26 or equivalent). 

• Analysis of algorithms (CS 126 or equivalent). 

• Theory of programming languages (CS 136 or equivalent). 

• Software engineering (CS 176 or equivalent). 

• Theory of operating systems (CS 156 or equivalent). 

Program Requirements 

All students in the master's program must complete the following core courses: 
CS 326 Advanced Analysis of Algorithms 

CS 336 Formal Specification of Languages 

CS 356 Theory of Operating Systems 

Students may choose either the thesis option or the problem report option. The the- 
sis option requires 24 hours of coursework, two hours of graduate seminar, and six 
hours of research. At least six hours beyond the 12 hours of core courses must be 
taken at the 300-level or 400-level. The thesis option requires the writing of an accept- 
able thesis which represents research suitable for publication in a refereed journal. 
These are archived in the University library. 

The problem report option requires 33 hours of coursework, two hours of graduate 
seminar, and three hours of research. At least nine hours beyond the 12 hours of core 
courses must be taken at the 300-level or 400-level. Students must also submit an 
acceptable written report describing a research project carried out by the student. 

Each master's student must form a supervisory committee of at least three mem- 
bers. This is done when the student has made some progress on regular coursework 
and is ready to select a program option and define a research project. Normally this 
occurs during the second or third semester of a student's program. The committee 
must be formed by the end of the semester which precedes the student's graduation 
semester. 

The chair of the committee must have regular graduate faculty status. In addition, for 
a committee overseeing a thesis, the majority of the members must have regular graduate 
faculty status. The committee must approve the student's program of study (coursework), 
proposed research, and written report. A formal meeting is held with the student and 
the committee at the time of its inception. At this time, the program of study is submitted 
and approved by the committee. 

All masters students must defend their thesis or problem report at an oral exam, 
attended by all members of the committee. The exam typically consists of two parts: a 
presentation of the research (about one hour) and a question period (about one hour). 
The questions cover material from the research as well as from coursework. 

A student who fails the oral exam may re-take the oral exam at most once, no earlier 
than the semester following the failure. 



Computer Science and Electrical Engineering 289 



Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 
Admission 

Applications for admission to the graduate program are made through the Office of 
Admissions and Records, P.O. Box 6009, Morgantown, WV 26506-6009. Informational 
inquiries may be addressed to the Graduate Coordinator of Computer Science and 
Electrical Engineering, P.O. Box 6109, Morgantown, WV 26506-6109. 

Admission requirements for the M.S. program may be summarized as follows: 

• An applicant must have an excellent record in previous college work. A minimum 
cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 (of 4.0), or its equivalent, is required for 
admission as a graduate student in electrical and computer engineering. 

• All applicants must submit scores of the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE). A score of 80 percentile rank is required on the quantitative 
part of the test. 

• All students whose native language is not English must submit Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores. A minimum score of 550 is required for admis- 
sion. In addition, they must attend New Student Orientation and take the Michigan 
Test of English. The results of this test will determine if the student will be required 
to take English as a Foreign Language (EFL) course(s). 

• An applicant not qualified for the regular graduate student admission status, due to 
insufficient grade-point average, incomplete credentials, or inadequate academic 
background, may be admitted as a provisional student. Requirements for attaining 
regular student status must be stated in the letter of admission. Provisional stu- 
dents must sign a contract listing these requirements in detail no later than their 
first registration. 

Description 

There are three options available for students to gain a master's degree: Course 
work only (subject to the student's AEC approval), thesis, or problem report. 

Course Work/Thesis/Problem Report 

Students following the course work program must take a minimum of 33 credit hours 
of course work plus two hours of graduate seminar. Students following the problem 
report option must take a minimum of 30 hours of course work, two hours of graduate 
seminar, and a minimum of three credit hours of research or independent study leading 
to a problem report. Students following the thesis option must take a minimum of 24 
credit hours of course work, two hours of graduate seminar, and a minimum of six credit 
hours of thesis research. Those students who lack course prerequisites may require 
more than three semesters of full-time study to complete the degree. Students sup- 
ported by research assistantships may also require more than three semesters to com- 
plete the degree and are expected to pursue the thesis option. 

Students pursuing either the thesis or problem report option leading to the M.S. de- 
gree must have the thesis or problem report approved by the Advisory and Examining 
Committee before it be accepted. The student must also pass a final oral examination 
and defense of the thesis or problem report administered by the AEC. 

Master of Science in Engineering Program 

The master of science in engineering program is available to students who are inter- 
ested in graduate work in electrical or computer engineering but hold a baccalaureate 
degree from another field of engineering or from another discipline. Students with a 
baccalaureate degree from another field of engineering or from one of the sciences 
should contact the department for further information. In general, a student in the M.S.E. 
program will be expected either to complete certain undergraduate prerequisite courses 
or to attain equivalent competence but may not be required to complete all of the re- 
quirements equivalent to the B.S.E.E. or B.S.C.E. degree. However, all graduate stu- 
dents will be required to meet the prerequisites for each course taken for credit. 

290 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Certificate in Software Engineering 

The Department offers a Certificate in Software Engineering degree to provide fur- 
ther software engineering education to individuals who are currently working in the 
computer and information technology industry. This program is usually offered at evening 
times and off-campus locations convenient for the working professional. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants for the Certificate in Software Engineering must meet the following re- 
quirements: 

• A bachelor's degree in any field from an accredited University; 

• Submit a resume documenting at least three years of software-related experience, 
OR a statement from their employer attesting to the need for them to take the 
program; 

• Provide names and addresses of three references who are familiar with the 
applicant's work. 

Program Requirements 

The Certificate program consists of completing five approved courses. 

Students who achieve a B or higher in each of the first four courses of the Certificate 
program will qualify to enter the Master of Science in Software Engineering program, 
described below. Courses taken for the Certificate program earn credit towards the 
Master's degree. 

Master of Science in Software Engineering 

The Master of Science in Software Engineering degree is intended to provide graduate 
level software engineering expertise to individuals who are either currently working in the 
computer and information technology industry or have academic credentials that provide a 
foundation to begin graduate work in software engineering. The Masters of Science in 
Software Engineering program aspires to serve both adult learners from local computer 
and information technology industry and traditional, resident full-time graduate students. 
This program is usually offered at evening times and off-campus locations convenient for 
the working professional. It may also be available by learning methods. 

Admission Requirements 

Students who have recently completed a bachelor's degree with little or no experi- 
ence in the high tech industry may gain regular admission if they meet the following 
requirements: 

• Hold a bachelor's degree in software engineering, computer science, computer 
engineering or an equivalent major; 

• Have a minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for all undergraduate coursework; 

• Have a minimum GPA of 3.0 for a coursework in the major; 

• Have a score of at least the 80th percentile in the quantitative component of the 
GRE. 

Applicants who have at least three years of software-related work experience in the 
high-technology industry may be admitted if they meet the following requirements: 

• Hold a bachelors degree in any field from an accredited University; 

• Submit a resume documenting at least three years of software-related experience; 

• Provide names and addresses of three references who are familiar with the 
applicant's work. 

Applicants in this category will be initially admitted as non-degree students. These 
students may enroll in courses of the MSSE program, and must earn a grade of at least 
B in each of the first four courses in the program. Upon meeting this requirement, 
students will be transferred to regular status. 



Computer Science and Electrical Engineering 291 



Program Requirements 

Students pursuing a Masters of Science in Software Engineering may elect a 
coursework only option, a problem report option, or a thesis option. The coursework 
option and the problem report option require completion of a total of 33 graduate credit 
hours. The thesis option requires a total of 30 credit hours. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Engineering 
Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering 
Admission 

Admission to the doctor of philosophy program in Computer or Electrical Engineering 
is open to students who qualify unconditionally for graduate study (see above under 
M.S. admission) and who have obtained an M.S. degree in science or engineering. In 
addition to transcripts and test scores required for M.S. admission, Ph.D. applicants 
must submit three letters of recommendation and a statement of purpose. Ph.D. appli- 
cants without a master's degree will be admitted to a master's program as the first 
stage in attaining the Ph.D. 

All students beginning graduate study will be given an entrance interview by the 
graduate coordinator to assist them in choosing classes before the end of the first week 
of classes of the semester they arrive on campus. The interview determines if the stu- 
dent needs remedial course work in order to pursue a graduate degree. Subsequently, 
an advisory and examining committee (AEC) must be formed and a plan of study pre- 
pared before the student registers for the second semester of classes. The student 
must declare a primary emphasis area within the department on the plan of study, as 
well as the intended option (course work, report, thesis) and courses to be taken. 

Students with deficiencies in their undergraduate programs may be required to take 
some courses as prerequisites for graduate courses. These deficiencies are usually 
noted as a condition for admission. However, they may also be specified as a result of 
the entrance interview or by the AEC. 

Description 

The doctor of philosophy program should be considered by those with the superior 
academic achievement and desire to pursue a career of research or teaching. Stu- 
dents interested in the Ph.D. program in electrical engineering or computer engineer- 
ing should contact the department for information. 

Program Length A typical Ph.D. program will take between three to four years beyond 
the baccalaureate degree, although scholarly achievements are more important than 
the length of the program, which does not depend solely on the accumulation of credit 
hours. The courses chosen for a program are selected to develop expertise in the 
student's area of interest and to strengthen knowledge of other areas that will support 
research endeavors. 

Examinations Ph.D. students are required to pass a written qualifying examination, 
normally within one year of their first enrollment in the Ph.D. program. The student 
must complete course work requirements as specified by the AEC, at least 1 8 hours of 
which must be at the 300 and 400 level at WVU. The student is also required to pass a 
written and oral candidacy examination given by the AEC and to successfully defend in 
oral examination a written research proposal. When all required course work is com- 
pleted, the qualifying and candidacy examinations are passed, and the research pro- 
posal is successfully defended, the student is formally admitted to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. degree. For full-time students, admission to candidacy must occur within three 
years of entering the Ph.D. program. After the student completes the research (at least 
24 credit hours) and prepares a dissertation, the final examination consists of a public 
defense of the dissertation. All requirements for the degree must be completed within 
five years after the student has been admitted to candidacy. 

292 WVU Graduate Catalog 



Research Research work for the doctoral dissertation is expected to represent a sig- 
nificant contribution to engineering. It may entail a fundamental investigation into a 
specialized area or a broad and comprehensive system analysis or design. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Computer and Information Sciences 

The doctor of philosophy is a research degree rather than a coursework degree. 
Doctoral students are required to complete a number of advanced courses but more 
time is spent in original research in close association with an experienced researcher. 
The Ph. D. degree is intended to prepare a student for teaching and research in com- 
puter and information science for business, industry, and educational institutions. 

Admission Requirements 

An applicant for admission to the doctoral degree program is expected to satisfy the 
following requirements for regular admission: 

• A bachelor's degree in computer science, equivalent to that offered by this depart- 
ment, from an accredited college or university; 

• A minimum GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; 

• At least a 3.0 GPA on all computer science, statistics, and mathematics coursework; 

• A GRE score of at least the 50th percentile on the verbal, quantitative, and analyti- 
cal components. 

Applicants not satisfying these requirements should work on a master's degree in 
computer science before applying for admission to the Ph.D. program. 

Application deadlines for the Ph.D. program are as follows: 

Fall semester March 1 

Spring semester October 1 

Summer session January 1 

Applications are accepted at any time; however, no guarantee of admission can be 
made for a specific semester if the deadline has not been met. If applicants cannot 
enroll at the designated semester after a favorable admission decision, no guarantee is 
given that they will be permitted to enroll at a later time. 

Program Requirements 

A doctoral student is expected to complete a minimum of 42 hours of formal graduate- 
level (300-level and 400-level) coursework in computer science beyond the bachelor's de- 
gree in computer science, or its equivalent, including 18 hours of advanced (400-level) 
graduate coursework beyond that required for the departmental qualifying examination, 
with at most six of the 1 8 hours being in "directed reading" courses. Depending on a student's 
background, additional course work may be required. 

Within three years of admission to the doctoral degree program, applicants must 
receive a high pass on each of the departmental qualifying examinations, demonstrat- 
ing a breadth of knowledge in computer science. A student may receive one of three 
grades on each exam: high pass, pass, or fail. A master's student must receive at least 
a pass on all four exams. Students are permitted two sittings to pass all four exams, but 
need not re-take exams on which they previously received an acceptable grade. A 
student who fails twice may appeal to the graduate faculty of the department, who may 
grant a third attempt under exceptional circumstances. A Ph.D. student who does not 
receive a high pass on these examinations after two attempts may transfer all credits 
earned in the doctoral program toward acquiring a master's degree. 

All doctoral students must demonstrate reading competency in scientific literature 
written in a language other than the student's native tongue. The choice of a foreign 
language other than French, German, Russian, Japanese, or Spanish must be ap- 
proved by the computer science graduate faculty. 

After satisfactorily passing the departmental qualifying examination, a doctoral 
student will be permitted to stand for the comprehensive examinations. These exami- 
nations will be prepared, administered, and evaluated by the student's dissertation com- 
mittee. All examinations must take place within a span of two calendar weeks. 

Computer Science and Electrical Engineering 293 



Usually after completion of the comprehensive examinations, the doctoral student 
will present a research prospectus to the dissertation committee, outlining the original 
research which the student is to perform. The prospectus will consist of a statement of 
the research problem, a review of the pertinent scientific literature in the area, and a 
description of the methods which will be employed by the student in an attempt to solve 
the research problem. After the committee has questioned the student on the prospec- 
tus and approved it as the doctoral research topic, the student will be recognized as a 
doctoral candidate. 

After the doctoral candidate has completed the original research outlined in the pro- 
spectus, the dissertation will be presented to the dissertation committee, after which 
the candidate will formally defend the dissertation at a public meeting. Full degree 
requirements are met when the dissertation committee deems that the candidate has 
successfully completed the research outlined in the prospectus and has performed 
satisfactorily in defense of the work. 

Doctoral candidates must satisfy the University's one-year residency requirement. It 
is expected that this one year of residency will be spent performing research after 
completion of the comprehensive examinations by completing nine hours of research 
in two consecutive semesters. 

Computer Engineering (CP E) 

242. Introduction to Digital Computer Architecture. 3 HR. PR: MATH 215, CPE 110, 111. Control, 
data, and demand driven computer architecture; parallel processing, pipelining, and vector pro- 
cessing; structures and algorithms for array processors, systolic architectures, design of architec- 
tures. 

250. Intro Microelectronic Circuits. II. 3 HR. PR: EE 56. VLSI (Very Large Scale Integrated) circuit 
design, including layout, simulation and performance optimization of basic digital logic functions 
and combinations of such basic functions into more complex digital system functions. MAGIC 
CAD tcols are used for projects. 

254. Digital System Testing. II. 3 HR. PR: CPE 110 or consent. Conventional and emerging fault 
modeling concepts. Fault Simulation. Test generation algorithms. Design for testability. Compres- 
sion testing techniques. Built in self-test. Functional testing. Boundary scan design and testing 
approaches. 

260. Intro to Information Systems. II. 3 HR. PR: CPE 110. This course will provide the student with 
background in the principles and practice of digital communications, beginning with early digital 
voice systems and extending through current systems based on "information" communications, 
including voice, data and video. 

270. Digital Systems Design. 3 HR. PR: CPE 71 . Hierarchical design methods, from the machine 
architecture, through data flow concepts and control flow concepts, to implementation. Topics 
include: design methodology, design techniques, machine organization, control unit implementa- 
tion and interface design. 3 HR. lee. 

271. Switching and Automata Theory. 3 HR. PR: CPE 71, 110, and MATH 215. Reliable design 
and fault diagnosis; synchronous and asynchronous sequential machines; finite state machines 
with automata theory. 

284. Real-Time Systems Development. I. 3 HR. PR: CS 156 or working knowledge of C program- 
ming language and UNIX. Characteristics of real-time systems, system and software develop- 
ment standards, structured and object oriented development methods for real-time systems, 
using a computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tool in the development of a large engi- 
neering project. Emphasis is on real-time systems requirements analysis and design. This is a 
project based course. 

291. Special Topics in Computer Engineering. I, II, S. 1-3 HR. PR: Junior, senior or graduate 
standing or consent. Investigation of topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. 

320. Application of Neural Networks. II. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Theories, principles, techniques, and 
procedures used in design implementation of supervised and unsupervised Neural Networks. 
Algorithms and computer programming for software realization with engineering applications. 

294 WVU Graduate Catalog 



321. Applied Fuzzy Logic. I. 3 HR. PR: Consent. Theory and applications of Fuzzy Logic; Fuzzy 
fundamentals, Fuzzy rules, decision-making systems, control systems, pattern recognition sys- 
tems, and advanced topics. Algorithms and computer programming for software realization with 
engineering applications. 

343. Fault Tolerant Computing. II. (Altyrs.) 3 HR. PR: CPE 110 or consent. Introduction to reliabil- 
ity analysis and Markov modeling. Computer System reliability modeling. Fault tolerant design of 
computer systems. Reconfiguration strategies in VLSI and WSI arrays. 

351. VLSI System Design. I. 3 HR. Introduction to Hardware Modeling Languages. CAD tools for 
logic synthesis and simulation. Design methodologies. Rapid Prototyping using field program- 
mable gate arrays. IC chip design. 

370. Switching Circuit Theory 7. 3 HR. PR: CPE 71 or equivalent. Course presumes an understanding 
of the elements of Boolean or switching algebra. Study of both combinational and sequential switching 
circuits with emphasis on sequential networks. Advanced manual design and computer-aided design 
techniques for single and multiple output combinational circuits. Analysis and design of sequential 
circuits. Detection and prevention of undesired transient outputs. 3 HR. rec. 

372. Advanced Computer Architecture. 3 HR. PR: CPE 71 and 110, 111 or consent. Formal tools 
for designing large digital systems are introduced; formal descriptive algebras such as ISP, PMS, 
AHPL, CDL, and others. An in-depth study of computer systems designs including instruction 
design and data path design. 3 HR. rec. 

373. Design of Computer Arithmetic Circuits. 3 HR. PR: CPE 71 or equivalent. Study of logic 
networks usable in performing binary arithmetic. Emphasis is on design of high-speed, parallel 
arithmetic units using binary numbers. Consideration of systems for representation of negative 
numbers. Available arithmetic subsystems are studied. 3 HR. rec. 

390. Advanced Independent Study. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Individual investigation in ad- 
vanced computer engineering subjects not covered in formal course. 

391. Advanced Topics. I, II, S. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation of advanced topics not covered 
in regularly scheduled courses. 

397. Master's Degree Research or Thesis. I, II, S. 1-15 HR. PR: Consent. Research activities 
leading to a thesis, problem report, research paper, or equivalent scholarly project. 

471 . Switching Circuit Theory 2. 3 HR. PR: CPE 370, MATH 236, or equivalent. Switching circuit 
theory is used to model the operations of networks of logic gates and flip-flops. Networks of this 
type are one form of discrete parameter systems. Studies the use of linear sequential machine as 
a means of modeling the general class of discrete parameter information systems. Systems 
approach and the techniques of abstract algebra used throughout. 3 HR. rec. 

472. Digital Systems Design 2. 3 HR. PR: CPE 372 or consent. Students will design a specific 
digital system, i.e., CPU control, interrupt structure, memory, or input/output system. They will 
design and test a project oriented toward one specific objective. 

490. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 HR. 

491. Advanced Study. 1-6 HR. PR: Consent. Investigation in advanced subjects which are not 
covered in regularly scheduled courses. Study may be independent or through specially sched- 
uled lectures. 

493. Special Topics. 1-6 HR. 

495. Independent Study. 1-6 HR. 

496. Graduate Seminar. 1 HR. PR: Consent. Technical presentations by faculty members, out- 
side speakers, and graduate students. Each student will give an oral presentation describing the 
student's research before the student's final examination. This will typically be a 40-minute pre- 
sentation before the faculty and graduate students. 

497. Research. 1-15 HR. 

499. Graduate Colloquium. 1-6 HR. 

Computer Science and Electrical Engineering 295 



Computer Science (CS) 

210. C++ Programming. I, II. 3 HR. An introduction to the C++ Programming Language. C++ 
constructs, designing and implementing applications in C++, using Software Engineering meth- 
odologies. Object-oriented programming techniques in C++. (High level language experience 
required.) 

216. Numerical Concepts. 3 HR. PR: MATH 16. Computer arithmetic, number representation, and 
errors; locating roots of equations; interpolation; numerical integration and differentiation; numeri- 
cal solution of initial value problems for ordinary differential equations; solving systems of linear of 
equations; data smoothing. 

228. Discrete Mathematics 2. II. 3 HR. PR: CS 126 and MATH 16 or equiv. Applications of discrete 
mathematics to computer science. Methods of solving homogeneous and non-homogeneous re- 
currence relations using generati